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^Y?_?.??!L^?.~7.?^i??.. JANUARY 28-FEBRUARY 3,' 200O A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 




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By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Impact fees are going up for 
Antioch schools. 

Both Antioch Community 
Consolidated School District 34 and 
Antioch Community High School 
District 117 boards of education 
voted to increase developer donation 
impact fees. 

The next step in the process will 
be the adoption of the new fee sched- 



ule by the village boards in the affect- 
ed communities of Antioch, Lake 
Villa and lindenhurst . 

The approximate increase of 12 
percent is as follows: 

Apartments increase from $1,000 
to $1,120 for two bedrooms and 
$4,000 to $4,480 for three bedrooms, 

Townhouses increase from 
$1,000 to $1,120 for two bedrooms 
and $1,500 to $1,680 for three 
bedrooms. 

Single family homes increase 



from $3,700 to $4,144 for three 
bedrooms and $4,250 to $4,760 for, 
four bedrooms. 

This -Is. --the -first impact fee 
increase since February 1998. 

"It shows very effective coriimuni : 
cation between the two school districts 
and boards of education," said Dr. 
Daniel Burke, District 34 superinten- 
dent. "Both recognize the need for 
increased revenues in this environ- 
ment of ever increasing enrollments." 

Despite the adoption of the 



recommended increase by the two 
boards at the District 34 and District 
117 meetings Jan. 18 and Jan. 20, 
respectively, the actual Implementa- 
tion comes with. the adoption of a 
ordinance by the respective villages. 

Typically, they've been very 
supportive of the schools," said Dr.. 
Dennis Hockney, District 117 super- 
intendent 

Village boards are expected to 
address the request within the next 
30 days. 



Global 
learning 

Japanese intern shares her culture 
with students at Antioch school 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 




earning can be an interna- * 
tional experience. 

In the case of students at 
Antioch Upper Grade 
School CAUGS), being taught by an 
intern from Japan is expanding their 
horizons. 

Rieko Okabe, age 25, from 
Kashiwa City, Chiba Prefecture 
(similar to a state) has been teaching 
at AUGS since Oct 16. The first 
semester, Okabe taught two classes. 
This semester, Okabe has three 
classes. There are 11 students in her 
eighth grade class, with two seventh 
grade classes of nine and ten 
students. 

Communication, English in 
particular, has been the biggest 
challenge for Okabe, 

"it's a give and take with the 
.students," admits Okabe, noting it is 
as much a learning experience for 
her as it is for the students, "I have 
always been helped by that" 

The curriculum which Okabe 
uses within the classes is quite 
varied. Included is origami, paper 
folding into various shapes; calligra- 
phy, writing or using a brush with 
black ink; and how to use 



chopsticks. 

"The students use them very 
well," sidd Okabe. 

Making a samurai hat and crane 
are among the items made using 
origami. The students have ' 
displayed some of their work in die 
school office. 

Japanese cuisine with chop 
sticks, a tea ceremony, flower 
arrangements and how to wear a 
yukata (similar to a dress) are among 
topics Okabe is covering. 

Further Japanese culture is 
explored through art and songs. 
During the first semester, Okabe 
taught her classes a Christmas song 
in Japanese. All of the songs are 
taught without the use of any type of . 
instruments. 

In teaching the language, Okabe 
starts out with a simple greeting. 
After advancing to words, Okabe 
works with the students to be able to 
engage in "easy conversation." • 

To take part in Okabe's class, 
students select it as an elective. 

Okabe sees many differences 
between Japanese and U.S. schools. 

Junior high students in Japan . 
must wear a uniform. The school 
year begins in April and runs 
through the following March. There 
Is a summer break of sorts, lasting 




Antioch to 




Ryan Lucas, a seventh grader at Antioch Upper Grade School, 
works on his Japanese language skills with the help of student 
teacher Rieko Okabe during class Jan. 18. — Photo by Sandy I 
Bressner- 



about one and one-half months. 

The schools in Japan are set up 
with elementary school lasting six 
years. Junior high and high school 
each last three years. While in 
school^ students each have their own 
dictionary and textbooks which they 
purchase from a bookstore. 

"Depending upon the school, 
some students have lots of 
homework during the summer," 
Okabe said with a smile, 

While at school, students are 
responsible for cleaning up the 
classroom and toilet The schools do 
not have janitors. 

In contrast to U.S. schools, 
Japanese students remain in the 
same classroom with the same 



group of students for the entire 
school day, Teachers move from 
room-to-room to teach the different 
subjects.' 

While in junior high school, all 
students are required to learn 
English as a second language. 
They can choose to continue to . 
study English in high school and 
"college. 

Okabe admits she misses Japan- 
ese food. While in the United States, 
Okabe has tried several Japanese 
restaurants. "Some are different but 
some are good," Okabe said. "It is 
expensive here, much more than in 
Japan." 

Please see GLOBAL I A4 



teencourt 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor ' 

A teen court is being established 
to serve the Antioch/Iindenhurst 
area beginning June 1. 

Teen volunteers are being 
sought for the new teen court 

Administered' by the Northern 
Illinois Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse (NICASA) in 
conjunction with area police depart- 
ments, teen court was established as 
an alternative to the traditional 
criminal justice system. It is aimed at 
first-time, non-violent juvenile 
misdemeanor offenders. 

Communities with teen courts 
underway include Round Lake, TjVp 
Forest/Lake Bluff, Warren Township, 
WaucondaTownship and Waukegan. 

Expansion of the teen court in 
the Antioch/Iindenhurst area was 
made possible by funding from the 
Communities for Youth Grant from 
the Illinois Department of Human 
Services.* 

Youth ages 14-18 who live or 
attend high school in the 
Antioch/Iindenhurst area are invit- 
ed to apply to become jurors and 
attorneys. 

Applications, are due Feb. 15, 
and are available at the police 
departments in Antioch and Iinden- 
hurst, and in the Dean's Office at 
ACHS. . 

Teen court provides a wonderful 
opportunity for youth to be a part of 
the solution regarding juvenile 
crime," said Julie Pawl, director of 
NICASA's Early Intervention Services. 

Teens who volunteer are provid- 
ed insight into the judicial system 
and- civic responsibility, Pawl 
explained. 

"I think teen court is a dynamite 
program for the Antioch and Linden- 
hurst communities," Antioch Police 
Chief Charlie Watidns said. "We are 
very excited . and believe this 
program will be well received." 

Watidns added, "We look 
forward to getting teen court up and 
running because it compliments our 
community-policing program." 

For information about teen 
court contact Jennifer Carlson at 
546-6450. 



Candlelight Bowl raises 
$4,000 for Burn Camp 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Helping the community is a 
common part of a firefighter's job. 

More often than not it ends up 
being a scary, stressful event 

However, for a few hours on the, 
evening of Jan. 15, the Antioch 
Firefighters Association (AFA) came 
together with members of quadrant 
four departments to help the 
community in a different way. 

The 4th Annual Candlelight 
Bowl, held at Antioch Bowling Lanes, 
drew its highest turnout ever of 130 



bowlers. The result of the efforts of 
firefighters, other emergency person- 
nel and their spouses and friends was 
a fun event raising an estimated 
$4,000. 

The proceeds are to be donated 
to the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance 
Bum Camp. 

"It was the best turnout we've 
ever had," said Mike Gliniewicz, 
candlelight bowl chairman. "I'd like 
to thank Dave Torkilsen for his help 
and everybody who came." 

"It was a really good turnout of 

» P/eose see BOWL IA4 



Alternate revenue bond possible 
despite denied voter petitions 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Two strikes against the petition- 
ers came out of the Antioch electoral 
board's review of petitions and 
counter petitions. 

The board announced after 
about two hours of review on Jan. 21 
at the Lake County Courthouse, two 
sections of the petitions against the 
-village's move to sell industrial 
revenue bonds are invalid, 

A third part of the petition, 
dealing with opposing the village's 



desire to pursue alternate revenue 
bonds, was upheld. 

Village Attorney Ken dark 
explained the procedure had a 
second petition challenging the 
validity of the first 

The electoral board, consisting of 
Mayor Marilyn Shlneflug, Village 
Clerk Candi Rowe and Senior Trustee 
Ronald Cunningham, reviewed the 
51 pages totaling 441 signatures on 
the petition. 

Upon review and cross checking 
with lists of registered voters 
obtained from the Lake County 



Clerk's office, of the 67 signatures 
objected to, four were found to be 
valid and 63 invalid. That left 378 
valid signatures, less than the 431 
needed for the required 10 percent 

Of the signatures disallowed, 20 
were printed instead of written, 
which is riot allowed, and 43 were not 
registered voters, according to the 
Lake County Clerk's records. 

Technically, the objector's 
petition to the protesting petition was 
"sustained" with the petition found 

Please see REFERENDUM I A4 



x want ads, call (847) 223-81G1: For home 



847)245.7500 



A2 /Lakeland Newspapers 



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COMMUNITY 




Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 









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„ *ifi -■ , T ! 







Start your engines 

The Antioch Rre Department's second station, located on Deep Lake Road, south of North Avenue, 
has acquired a new ladder truck. This is the first truck of its kind to be based in the- village. 
— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Property owners upset 



I 

i over pro 

BYJOEVANZANDT 
Correspondent 

Two dozen property owners 
• with land neighboring the Thelen 
gravel pit on Rte. 173 attended a pub- 
lic hearing Jan. 12 with the Fox Lake 
Planning Commission and Zoning 
Board of Appeals. 

At the lengthy and occasionally 
confrontational public hearing at- 
tended' by representatives of the 
Thelen family and their attorney, 
, neighbors raised concerns as Thelen 
attorney Kenneth Clark proposed 
annexation of some of the Thelen 
land. 

Clark said the Thelens would like 
the remaining 355 acres of the prop- 
erty to be annexed. 

As part of an annexation agree- 
ment, the Thelens asked that most of 
the land be re-zoned from agricul- 




annexation 



tural to industrial (M-2J, which per- 
mits sand and gravel mining. 

The request brought strong ob- 
jections from residents of the neigh- 
boring Fox River Springs subdivi- 
sion, which is situated on the east 
end of the Thelen land and is in An- 
tioch Township. 

The property owners recited a 
litany of complaints. They said the 
gravel pit generates noise and dust as 
late as 3 aim. and the continual pa- 
rade of gravel trucks in and out of the 
pit results in gravel damage to their 
vehicles each year. 

The operation of rock crushers 
rattles their houses, causing damage 
to the walls, ceilings and founda- 
tions, property owners complained. 
They also expressed fear that the vol- 
ume of water used in the operation 
could cause their wells to go dry. 

Finally, they said when Thelen 



expanded the gravel mining opera- 
tion several years ago, it caused a de- 
crease in their property values. 

Clark responded that the The- 
lens do not plan to mine gravel right 
up to Converse RA They plan to cre- 
ate a landscape berm on the east end 
of the gravel pit to serve as a buffer to 
houses in the vicinity. 

After weighing all of the com- 
ments, Plan Commission Chairman 
Ron Stochl closed the hearing. The 
plan commissioners, formulated the 
following compromise proposal to 
recommend to the Village Board. If 
the Thelen property is annexed, a 60- 
acre strip running from, north to 
south along the east end would not 
be rezoned M-2. So, while the The- 
lens could expand their gravel pit to 
the east, neighboring residents 
would be protected by a much larg- 
er buffer than had been proposed. 





ital thefts 



ByTIMO'DONNELL 
Staff Reporter 

Three people have been arrested 
in connection, to a string of animal 
hospital burglaries around Lake 
County. 

Marissa ). Arteaga,. 19, of 
Mundelein, Glenn E Trauthwein, 19, 
of Waukegan and a 16-year-old male 
from Chicago were taken into cus- 
tody on Jan. 21. 

The arrests of these three have 
closed burglary investigations of the 
Antioch Animal Clinic, Mundelein 
Animal Hospital, Beach Park Animal 
Hospital, Grayslake Animal Hospital, 
Best Friends Animal Hospital in 
Grayslake, Round Lake Animal Hos- 
pital and Lake Zurich Animal Hospi- 
tal. 

The trio was also connected to 
the burglaries of Sandy and Gwen's 
Tavern in Mundelein and BInnie's 
Pizza in Round Lake. 

In addition to these Lake Coun- 
ty incidents, the three provided in- 
formation regarding their roles in 
burglaries of other veterinary clinics 
in Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana and 
Minnesota. If confirmed, these inci- 
dents would total in excess of 20 ad- 
ditional burglaries. 

The trio allegedly broke into the 
Mundelein Animal Hospital in unin- 
corporated Mundelein on Dec 19. 

After breaking down the door, 
they allegedly stole money and two 
animal anesthetics: ketamine and 
telazole. 

Ketamine hydrochloride, which 
is commonly known as M K" or "Spe- 
cial K" on the street, is reportedly used 
illegally as a hallucinogen. The drug is 
similar to PCP in make-up and can in- 
duce "near death" experiences. 

• The arrests of these three sub- 
jects were the result of a meeting ini- 
tiated by the Lake County Sheriffs 
Office with other county law en- 



forcement agencies experiencing 
similar.break-ihs. 

While comparing notes at the 
meeting,. information p'rovided^by 
the Mundelein Police, Department, 
the Lake County Sheriff's office and 
the Lake Zurich Police Department 
led to a list of potential suspects. 

A break in the cases came when 
Lake County investigators received 
additional information regardingthe 
three that were arrested from; the 
City of DeKalb Police Department. - 

Lake County Sheriff Gary Del Re 
said tiiat the DeKalb police were in- 
vestigating the same suspects for 
break-ins in their jurisdiction. Inves- 
tigators from Lake County and 
DeKalb worked closely together to 
discover that the suspects were plan- 
ning to burglarize a veterinary clinic 
in DeKalb. 

On Jan. 21, Trauthwein and the 
Chicago juvenile, who was reported 
as a runaway to the Chicago Police 
Department in October 1999, were 
arrested while burglarizing the 
DeKalb veterinary clinic. Arteaga was 
arrested later that day. 
. "This is a prime example of the 
results that can be achieved when 
law enforcement agencies work to- 
gether," commented Del Re. 

Trauthwein was held at the 
DeKalb County Jail on charges in 
that jurisdiction and will be served 
with arrest warrants for his role in six 
Lake County burglaries. 

Arteaga was turned over to the 
custody of the Lake County Jail 
charged with four counts of burglary^ 
She was released on a $50,000 recog- 
nizance bond. 

The Chicago youth was trans- 
ported to the Depke Juvenile Deten- 
tion Center where he is facing eight 
counts of burglary. 

The investigation into these bur- 
glaries continues, as more suspects 
are still being sought. 



Use caution, don't smoke when filling up your 




For those readers who fre- 
quent mini-marts or other 
types of gas stations, one of 
your fellow Citizens is upset 
with people who insist upon smok- 
ing in the pump areas. 

Antioch Police Chief Charlie 
Watkins said there is no state or lo- 
cal law regarding smoking in those 
buildings or In the area of the 
pumps. 

The only law on the books is re- 
garding public buildings, such as • 
the village hall, school grounds, and 
library, in which smoking is not al- 
lowed. 

As for the mini-marts, they are 




; 



OUR 
TOWN 

Michael H. Babicz 



privately owned buildings used for 
business. It is up to the particular 
business owner what standard 
which they want to uphold at the 
facility. 

Common sense would recom- 
mend persons not smoke while 



pumping gas. In addition, signs 
posted instruct customers not to 
leave the vehicle running while 
pumping gas. 

These recommendations are 
more of a liability issue for the busi- 
ness and its owner. Watkins says 
there actually is no law regarding 
the matter. 

Regardless, please take care 
when filling up your vehicle. 



For teenagers ages 12-19, PM&L 
Is having auditions at the Theatre, 
877 Main St., in Antioch at 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday, Jan. 30. 

This is for the Reader's Theatre 



presentation of "Voices 2000" by 
Peter Dee and adapted for Reader's 
Theatre by the director, Barbara 
Conkrite of Fox Lake, 

The play will be presented Sun- 
day, Feb. 27. 

Always envied those people 
who could write "fancy." 

People interested in learning 
calligraphy ("fancy lettering" for 
those of us who can't remember the 
official name) can take a class. 

Roger Shule, Antioch Upper 
Grade School (AUGS) art teacher, 
will offer a nine-week class appro- 
priate for both beginning and inter- 



mediate skill levels. 

A minimum of eight persons 
are needed for the class. Fee is S50 
for the entire course. The course 
will meet 7-9 p.m. Thursdays in 
Feb. 'and March, with the last class 
on April 6 at the AUGS Art Room 
215. 

To register or get more informa- 
tion, contact Shule at 838-8342 or 
AUGS Office 838-8300. 



If you have interesting infonna- 
(ion or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Mike 
Babicz at 223-8161, ext. 138 ore- - 
mail, edit @huicom. " 



Antioch News 

Vol. 115 No, 4 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



Mamt* ol ninort Pr»»i Auoc 

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A4 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January '28, 2000 





Pomp and circumstance 

Officer Sandy Davenport of the Antioch Police Department hands out diplomas to W.C. Petty School 
fifth graders during a DARE graduation ceremony Jan. 21.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 

St. Peter's observes Catholic Schools Week 



Spelling, lunch, science and 
skiing are all part of Catholic 
Schools Week 2000 at St. Peter's in 
Antioch. 

The week of activities starts with 
"Buddy up Day" on Monday, Jan. 31. 
Different grade levels will meet up 
for a special activity. 

Blue & White Panther Pride Day 
featuring a spelling bee will be Tues- 
day, Feb. 1, Students are encouraged 
to wear St. Peter's blue and white 



school colors, or school athletic 
shirts and sweatshirts. Spelling bees 
will be held at 1 p.m. with grades 1-2 
in the cafeteria and grades 3-8 in the 
gym. 

Lunch with Parents is the focus 
activity on Wednesday, Feb. 2. Par- 
ents are invited to join their children 
for the traditional "winter picnic" 
luncheon. 

A science fair and open house is 
planned for Thursday, Feb. 3. Class- 



rooms and science projects will be 
available for viewing from 1:30-2:45 
p.m. 

On Friday, Feb. 4, the week 
winds up with First Friday Mass at 
9:30 a.m. with the student council, 
and a family ski trip to Wilmot 
Mountain at 3 p.m. 

For information on any of the ac- 
tivities or on educational offerings at 
St. Peter's School, contact principal 
Pat Dieveney at 395-0037. 



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December 31st of a tax year. If you live apart from your spouse and meet 
certain tests, you may be considered unmarried for the entire year. If you are 
divorced under a final decree by the last day of the year, you are considered 
unmarried for the entire year. 

ANNULLED MARRIAGES 

If you obtain an annulment that declares your marriage never existed, you are 
considered unmarried for this and any previous tax year. You must amend your 
tax returns for all the tax years not affected by the statute of limitations for 
filing a return to show this change in marital status. 

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 

Single or separated taxpayers should check to see if they qualify for head of 
household filing status. This filing status allows a taxpayer to take a higher 
standard deduction, possibly be eligible for a lower tax bracket and perhaps 
qualify for the earned income credit. 



FROM PAGE Al 



REFERENDUM 



to be invalid, according to Clark. 

The electoral board disallowed a 
second section of the petition chal- 
lenging the wording of the ordi- 
nance. 

A minimum of 323 valid signa- 
tures was necessary for the petition- 
ers to have the request for the is- 
suance of alternative revenue bonds 
be placed before the voters in a refer- 
endum. 

The village board is expected to 
eventually make a decision on the al- 
ternate revenue bonds question be- 
ing brought forward in a referendum. 

Village Manager Tim Wells ex- 
plained a meeting with Harold War- 
ren of Warren & Associates, the vil- 
lage's bond consultant, regarding op- 
tions the village has available. 



Wells declined to set a time table 
for a village decision, saying since the 
developer is progressing with putting 
in the lines, action by the village is 
not required as quickly. 

In response to hearing about the 
decision, Norman C. Geary, one of 
the major petition circulators, ex- 
plained he had not received written 
notification from the electoral board. 

"It's my understanding the re- 
sults need to be put in writing and 
give the petitioners 10 days to ap- 
peal," Geary said. 

As of the afternoon of Jan. 24, 
Geary said he had not received any 
such notification. 

Geary said the petitioners would 
make their decision once official no- 
tification is received. 



GLOBAL 



In Arlington Heights, Okabe has 
found a "good" Japanese store 
which she has been to twice so far. 

The weather in the midwest is 
colder than where Okabe is from in 
Japan. There is some snow in the 
part of Japan where she lives, but 
not as much as around the Antioch 
area. In Japan, snow falls predomi- 
nantly in January and February. 

Despite some of the differences, 
Okabe says Japan goes through the 




Rieko Okabe gives a lesson on 
Japanese language characters 
to a class of seventh graders at 
Antioch Upper Grade School 
Jan. 18.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



four seasons similar to Antioch. 

One difference is Japan does 
not have any snow during the end 
of March and into April when cher- 
ry blossoms are prevalent. 

While teaching the students at 
AUGS, Okabe is working on her own 
education. She will return to Japan 
in July where anotheryear of exten- 
sive study awaits her. Upon comple- 
tion, Okabe will be able to teach the 
Japanese language to foreigners 
coming to her native country. 

"I will need qualification and 
have to pass a test," Okabe ex- 
plained the procedure of becoming 
a teacher in Japan. "You have to 
study hard. You can study yourself, 
go to school or take a correspon - 
dence course. I have to work to get 
the money to go to school." 

Okabe is living with four host 
families during her overall stay. At 
present, Okabe is staying with 
Laurel and Jim Hochstetler In 
Crystal Lake. Each stay is about 
three months. 

"I like my kids/' Okabe said re- 
garding her experience at AUGS. 
"They are curious about Japan. I'm 
glad they're very excited about my 
teaching." 

"I'm having a great experience 
here," Okabe concluded. 



BOWL 



raffle prizes from the community," 
Gliniewicz said, recognizing the sup- 
port of merchants. "It went over real 
well." 

In addition to Antioch, other de- 
partments represented include Fox 
Lake, Grayslake, Lake Villa and 
Round Lake. 

The Burn Camp is attended by 
children who have been involved in 
and injured in fires. These children, 
for the most part, would not be able 
to attend summer camp under any 
other circumstances, due to their 
special needs and the cost of a camp 
experience. 

Originally held as a summer 
camp in June at Camp Duncan in 
Fox Lake, a winter camp has been 



added as well. 

Burn Camp is equipped to offer 
these special burn victims support 
both medically and psychologically, 
and allow them to be just like all oth- 
er campers. 

This program is supported finan- 
cially throughout the state all year 
long by firefighters. 

The candlelight bowl is the AFA's 
special effort to involve area depart- 
ments In the support effort. 

A second fundraising effort will 
come this summer. The 10th Anniver- 
sary Firefighters Golf Outing will be 
Aug. 11-12 at the Antioch Golf Club. 

For information on the golf out- 
ing, contact Lee Shannon at 395- 
5511. 



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January 28, 2000 



POLICE & FIRE 




• 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A&, 



POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guihy in a court of law. 



ANT10CH 



No valid license 

Paul M. Barteli, 18, 37975 N. No- 
ra! PL, Spring Grove, was stopped by 
Antioch Police at North Ave. and Rte, 
83 at 3:11 a.m. Jan. 21. Barteli was re- 
portedly observed driving a blue Ply- 
mouth Sundance with no front li- 
cense plate, a cracked windshield 
and the rear registration light not il- 
luminated. BartelTs Identifiers were 
run through a computer check, com- 
ing back as a valid Illinois instruc- 
tional permit When asked if he had 
a instructional permit, Barteli al- 
legedly advised the officer he did not. 
Barteli was placed under arrest and 
transported to the Antioch Police 
station. Tickets were issued for fail- 
ure to display a front registration 
plate, no rear registration plate light, 
a defective windshield (cracked), in- 
structional permit violation/and not 
on person, and having; no valid li- 
cense. Barteli was released on a per- 
sonal recognizance bond with • a 
court date of 9 am Feb. 23 at Branch 
III Court in Grayslake. 

Cervantes V. Abel, 22, 124 N. 
Philippa, Waukegan, was stopped by 
Antioch Police at 10:10 a.m. Jan. 16 at 
Rte. 173 and McMillen Rd. Police re- 
portedly observed Abel driving a 
blue Dodge van westbound on Rte, 
173 being clocked at 53 mph in a 40 
mph zone. Abel was stopped on Rte. 
173 just before the railroad tracks. 
Abel admitted to not haying a dri- 
ver's license on him, but did produce 
insurance papers for the friend 
whose van it was and had some per- 
sonal paper work verifying his iden- 
tity. In checking Abel through the 
computer, he was allegedly found to 
not have a valid driver's license. Abel 
was transported to Antioch Police 
station where he received tickets for 
speeding and having no valid dri- 
ver's license. Abel was released on a 
personal recognizance bond with a 
court date of March 8 at Branch III 
Court in Grayslake, 

Warrant arrest 

Antioch Police received a re- 
quest from Crystal Lake Police to as- 
sist in checking on a suspect wanted 
on an outstanding warrant in Crystal 
Lake. Antioch police checked the ad- 
dress of Karrie L Johnson, 36, of 267 
W. Rte. 173, finding the suspect at the 
location at 3:43 p.m. Jan. 18. Johnson 
was placed under arrest and trans- 
ported to the Antioch Police station. 
Following several failed attempts to 
obtain bond through phone calls, 
Johnson was held on the deceptive 
practice warrant until Crystal Lake 
Police arrived at which time Johnson 
was turned over to their custody. 

Suspended license 

James Brian Hansen, 32, 311 
Thornwood Dr., Lindenhurst, was 
stopped by Antioch Police at 12:24 
p.m. Jan. 17. Hansen was allegedly 
observed driving a red Chevy pickup 
truck westbound on North Ave. at 
Dram, being clocked at 42 mph in a 
30 mph zone. After being stopped, 
Hansen informed the officer he did 
not have his driver's license on him. 
Following a computer check of his 
identifiers, Hansen was found to 
have a suspended driver license. 
Hansen was transported to Antioch 
Police station and received tickets for 
speeding and driving while on a sus- 
pended license. Hansen was re- 
leased on a $100 cash bond with a 
court date of Feb. 24 at Branch III 
Court in Grayslake. 

Charles H. Elderedge, 55, 10510 
Main St, Richmond, was stopped by 
Antioch Police eastbound on Rte. 173 
at Grim Rd. at 7:14 p.m. Jan. 15. El- 
deredge was reportedly observed dri- 
ving a black Cadillac clocked at 56 
mph in a 40 mph zone. Upon check- 
ing Elderedge's driver's license, it 
came back suspended. Elderedge was 
transported to Antioch Police station 



where he was ticketed for speeding, 
driving while on a suspended license 
and improper lighting/only one head 
lamp. Elderedge was released on a 
$1,000 recognizance bond pending a . 
court date at 9 am. Feb. 9 at Branch 
III Court in Grayslake. 

Petr.Chasak, 4416 W. Belmont 
Ave., Chicago, was stopped by Anti- 
och Police at Rte. 173 and Harden 
Ave at 4:04 p.m. Jan. 15l Chasak re- 
portedly was driving a black Oldsmo- 
bile Coupe westbound on Rte. 173, 
passing a stopped vehicle on the right 
shoulder of the roadway. When 
checking, Chasak' s driver's license 
came back suspended. Chasak was 
transported to the Antioch Police sta- 
tion where he was ticketed for im- 
proper passing on a shoulder and dri- 
ving while having a suspended li- 
cense. Chasak was released on a $100 
bond with a court date of 9 a.m„ Feb. 
9 at Branch III Court in Grayslake. 

DUI 

Joseph J. Palinsky, 59, 25470 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, was 
stopped by Antioch Police at Rte. 83 
just north of North Ave. and the Wis- 
consin/Illinois state line at 3:53 a.m. 
Jan. 18. Palinsky was reportedly ob- 
served by police driving a maroon 
Jeep Cherokee, northbound on Main 
St(Rte. 83), to the left of the center 
line.. The driver slowly returned to 
the northbound lane, slowing to ap- 
proximately 5 mph, weaving slowly 
while staying in his lane. Approach- 
ing the northbound Main St. stop- 
light, which according to the police 
report was green, Palinsky stopped 
his vehicle and waited several min- 
utes with the light still green. Palin- 
sky suddenly accelerated through 
the intersection with no hesitation. 
The officer activated his warning 
lights and spotlight with the driver 
stopping at the state line. Palinsky 
appeared confused when the officer 
requested his license, stating, "I'm 
just goln home." Palinsky was a court 
date on the DUI and an outstanding 
warrant at 9 a.m. Feb. 15 in Branch 
III Court In Grayslake. 

LAKE VILLA 

Suspended driver's license 

Thomas G. Ciura, 26, of 1219 
Woodridge in. Round Lake was ar- 
rested Jan. 20.at 9:34 p.m. for driving 
with a suspended driver's license. An 
officer dispatched to a possible car 
fire found Ciura at the Citgo Station 
on rte. 83 and rte. 132 where Ciura re- 
portedly confessed to not having a 
driver's license or insurance. Ciura 
was arrested, transported to the Lake 
Villa Police Department, processed 
and released after posting an I bond. 
His court date is scheduled for Feb, 9. 

Revoked driver's license 

Hilario Sanchez, 31 , of 1330 Sun- 
set in Round Lake Beach, was arrest- 
ed Jan. 18 at 10:15 a.m. for driving 
with a revoked driver's license. 
Sanchez was pulled over on Cedar 
Lake Rd;, cited for driving an unin- 
sured vehicle and transported to the 
Lake Villa Police Department for 
processing. His court date is sched- 
uled for Feb. 9. 

Possession of Marijuana 

Adam M. Schuster, 17, of 212 
McKinley Ave. in Lake Villa, was ar- 
rested Jan. 22 at 10:32 p.m. for pos- 
session of marijuana. McKinley was 
approached by officers in Painted 
Lakes subdivision when officers no- 
ticed a parked car. He was transport- 
ed to the Lake Villa Police Depart- 
ment, processed and released after 
posting a $100 bond. His court date 
is scheduled for Feb. 11. 

LINDENHURST 



Ave. in Twin Lakes WI, was arrested 
Jan. 21 at 12:09 am, for driving under 
the influence of alcohol. Pahl was 
pulled over and 'cited for Improper 
lane, usage at Grand Ave. and 
Hawthorn Dr., arrested, transported 
to the Lindenhurst Police Depart- 
ment, processed and released after 
posting a $300 cash bond. Pahl's 
court date has not been scheduled. 

• Mark J. Giuliano, 31, of 716 Wa- 
ters Edge in Lake Villa, was arrested 
Jan. 19 at 11:53 p.m. for driving un- 
der the influence of alcohol. Giuliano 
was pulled over at Grand Ave. and 
Prospect, cited for improper lane us- 
age, failing to signal, improper use of 
a registration, not having insurance, 
driving with a suspended license and 
driving under the influence of alco- 
hol. He was transported to the Lin- 



denhurst Police Department, 
processed and released after posting 
a $300 I bond. His court date is 
scheduled for Feb, 8. 

Jerald E Cardin, 68, of 42 Hawley 
in Grayslake, was arrested Jan. 18 at 
1:28 a.m, for driving under the influ- 
ence of alcohol. Pulled over on 
Grand Ave., Cardin was arrested, 
transported to the Lindenhurst Po- 
lice Department, processed and re- 
leased after posting a $100 cash 
bond. His court date is scheduled for 
Feb. 8. 

Suspended 
driver's license 

Dan R. Blanton, 3.8, of 37348 
Columbus Ave. in Lake Villa, was ar- 



rested Jan. 18 at 5:38 p.m. for driving 
with a suspended license. Blanton 
was pulled over arid cited for dis- 
obeying a traffic controlsignal at the 
comer of Sand Lake and'Grahd Ave. 
He was arrested,"4ransported to the 
Lindenhurst Police Department, 
processed and released after posting 
a$100 cash bond. His court date is 
scheduled for March 1. 

Norbert J. Prahger, 28, of 709 
Waters Edge Dr. In Lake Villa, was'ar- 
rested Jan. 20 at 11:47 a.m. for driving , 
with a suspended license. Pranger 
was pulled over and cited for speed- 
ing at Grand Ave. and Deerpath, ar- 
rested, transported to the Linden- 
hurst Police Department, processed 
and released after posting a $100 
cash bond. His court date has been 
scheduled for March 1. 



Lakeland Newspapers 






Karin Kovell 








Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 






Serving Antioch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst 
& Wisconsin 




Lai** <-'-■- 'J 


PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 28, 2000 



Woman's Club exceeds 
wetland financial goal 



By MICHAEL H. BABIC2 
Community Editor 



Success!! 

The Antioch Woman's Club has 
come up with enough funds to cover 
a portion of the William E. Brook 
Memorial Wetland project, and then 
some. 

Sue Allen, community improve- 
ment program chairperson, was 
asked to help with the winter recre- 
ational sledding/skating part of the 
Wetland project in 1998. Allen, on 
behalf of the club, "gladly" took on 
the project. 

This portion of the project' in- 
cludes a warming shed, protective 
fencing and padded poles for a sled- 
ding hill, lighting and labor. 

One of the ways the club raised 
funds was holding a raffle for a Wet- 
land's Quilt. The quilt was designed 
by Robin Kessell of Quitter's Dream, 
a local Antioch business, and the 
quilling work was done by members 
of the woman's club. 

Additionally, a Masquerade Din- 
ner/Dance was held Oct. 30. The 
evening was well attended by many 
club members, friends and several 
community dignitaries. A silent auc- 
tion, 50/50 raffle, Beanie Baby raffle 
and the highlight of the evening, the 
quilt raffle, helped raise additional 
funds. 

"These fundraising activities 
were very successful," said Allen. 
"We were able to present a check 
that evening to the Village to cover 
the cost of the project." 

Once the club tallied all of its 
funds and paid incurred expenses re- 
garding the evening, an additional 




Sue Allen, center, Antioch Woman's Club vice president and com- 
munity improvement project chairperson, surprises Claude 
LeMere and Dan Dugenske with a second check for the winter 
•recreation portion of the project. The woman's club raised funds 
in excess of what was needed for the William E. Brook Wetlands 
Project. — Submitted photo. 



surplus was discovered. 

"We found we made more mon- 
ey than expected," Allen said. The 
club voted at its last meeting to sub- 
mit an additional check to be used 



for whatever is needed regarding the 
wetland project. 

"The Antioch Woman's Club 
thanks the community for all of.their 
help and support," Allen added. 



Sequoit Pride offers unique raffle prizes 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 

Win the circle drive named in 
honor, or a preferred parking spot. 

Those are two raffle items to be 
offered soon at ACHS. 

The Sequoit Pride organization 
received approval from the board of 
education to have the two items 
available as prizes. 

The new circle drive in the front 



of the school main entrance off Main 
St. named after a lucky winner for 
one year. 

Plans arc to begin selling the raf- 
fle tickets for the honor at the start of 
the football .season in August. Sales 
would continue until just prior to the 
winter holiday break with the winner 
being announced prior to the vaca- 
tion. 

A second raffle will be underway 
soon with two parking spaces near 



the building being the main prizes. 
Those tickets will be available to both 
students and faculty members. 

The stipulation on the parking 
spaces is the student must already 
have qualified to have a school park- 
ing permit. 

Plans are to have the parking 
space raffle completed by the end of 
the school year so the winners are in 
place by the opening of school in the 
fall. 




Come Worship With Urf 

A Dii'eciory Of Antioch Area Chuvchcs 



Graceland Baptist Church. 25B Ida SI.. Antioch, IL 
Sunday School 1 1am , Morning Worship 1 lam , 
Sunday Evening 7pm. Robert Williams, Pastor. 

First Church ol Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm. file 173 and 
Harden, Antioch, Phone |W7) 395-1 196. Sunday School, Sunday 
Church Servipo 10 30am, Wednesday, 7:30pm. 

Beautiful Savior Evangelical Lutheran Church. 554 Parkway. 
Antioch. Phone (B47) 265-2450 Sunday Worship at 9am, Sunday 
School. High School & Adult BMu Classes 1030am. 

Heritage Lutheran Church. Lindcnhursl Civic Center, 1949 Ofd Elm 
Rd , Lindcnhursl. (847) 356-1756, Sunday service 1000 am. Sunday 
School & BiUo Class 9 00 am (summer sched Ju ■ 900 am Sunday) 
Rev. Mark W, Anderson, pastor. 

SL Ignatius Episcopal. 977 Main St Phone (847) 39506G2. Low Mass 
730am, Hgh Mass 9 30am SinrJay School & Nursery 930am. 

AnUoch Evangelical Fre« Church. 750 Hyhview Dr. Phono (B47) 395- 
4117. Saturday Evening Service 5 30 p.m. 5unday School 9.45am, 
Sunday Worship 8:30. 11:00, Children's Church 11am. Nursery both 
services Awana Club. Senior Pastor David M . Grolcau. > 

SI. Stephen Lutheran Church (ELCA). 1 1 55 HillsHo Ave. Phono (847) 
395-3359. Sunday Worship, B & 9.30nm. Rev Roberl Trendd, Interim 
Paslor. 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies ol God Church. 41625 Deep 
Lake Rd , Arrticch. Phono (847) 395-8572. Sunday School (all ages) 
9am. ( Sunday Morning Worship 10am. Chldrons Church 10am, 
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30pm, Wednesday Worship & Children's 
Program 7am, Tucs. Women's Fellowship & BHa Study 9-1 1:30am 
Jctt Drussaly, ftislor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main Si., Phone 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday Worship 3 & 10:30am., Sunday Scnoo? 
9:25am., Sal. 7pm., Rev. Gregory Meimanson, Paslor. Christian 
Day School (847) 395-1664. 

Mlllburn Congregational United Church ol Christ. GrassLake 
Rd. at Rte. 45. Phone (847) 350-5237. Sunday Service 10am 
Children's Program 10am. Rev. Paul R. Mellior, Pastor. 

United Methodist Church of Anlloch. 848 Main SI. Phone (847) 
395- 1 259. Worship 8 30 4 1 0am . Fellowship Time 930am; Sunday 
School 10am Rev. Kurl A Gamfin, Pastor. 

SI. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St., Antioch. Phone (847) 395- 
0274. Masses weekdays, 7:30am; Sunday 6:30, 8, 9:30. 1 1:30am 
& Saturday 5:30pm. Rev. Father Ronald H. Angifm, Paslor. 

Chain ol Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. Grass Lake 
Rd., Antioch. Phono (847) B38-0103. Sunday Worship B: 15 and 10.45. 
Sunday School 9 45 Children's Church 10 45. Youlh, Women's, Awana 
4 Small Group ministries, Paslor, Paul McMmirny. 

. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod)- 25100 W. 
Grand Ave. (Rio. 59 & 132). Lake Villa. (847) 356-51 58, Sunday 
Worship 8:15 & 10:45nm; Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible 
Sludy 9:30am. Christian Preschool. Rev. John Zeiimcr, Paslor. 

Lighthouse Church ol Anlloch 

554 Parkway Ave , Antioch, IL (B47) 838-0616, Saturday Evening 
Service 7:00 p m. Adventure Club lor Kids, Adult Bible Study 
Saturday Evening 6:00 p.m. Monday Evening Bible Study 7:00 
p.m. Thursday Evening PTSD Support Group 7:00 p m. Senior 
Pastor Tom Barlmer. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



^ 



SCHOOL DIGEST 



Book fair thanks 

Upper Grade students and staff 
extend a big thank you to the volun- 
teers who helped out with the 
Scholastic Book Fair. 

Volunteers included Library 
Learning Center volunteer coordina- 
tors Patrice Holm and Lori McKen- 
zie, as well as Kendra Farm, Sandra 
Hebron, Mary Napier, Helen Voit, 
Joann Giolek, Lisa Hilgenberg, Nan 
Mitchell, Kate Jefferson, Alice Finch; 
Diahna Passerelli, Diane Damiani, 
Susan Fisher and ReneeAlm. 

Winner of the drawing of $25 in 
free books and a restaurant gift cer- 
tificate was Justin DeGroot. 

Profits from the fair, totaling 
$2,000, went toward books and will 
assist in sponsoring a spring author 
visit. 

Author visit 

The next Upper Grade School 
author visit will be Tuesday, Feb. 29. 
Todd Strasser, writer of more than 
100 novels for middle grade arid 
teenage readers, will be visiting. 
Strasser's humorous books address 
serious concerns. Strasser's writing 
goal is "to showstudents reading can 
be fun." 



Magazines needed 

The Antioch Upper Grade 
School Library Learning Center is in 
need of any old magazines which 
people may have around their 
homes or offices. The magazines will 
be used for various class projects 
during the year. Especially needed 
are pictures of animals, people and 
places. 

Scholarship offered 

State Representative Timothy 
H. Osmond, 62nd Legislative Dis- 
trict announces that he is now ac- 
cepting applications for the Illinois 
Assembly Public Affairs Scholar- 
ship for students residing in the 
62nd Legislative District pursuing 
an education at one of the Illinois 
State Universities in the fall of 
2000. 

Qualifications are that the stu- 
dent be a resident of the 62nd Leg- 
islative District; have received ac- 
ceptance at a state university as 
•full-lime student; show evidence of 
activity in public and civic affairs; 
and have relative need. Any stu- 
dent wishing to apply should call 
Rep. Osmond's legislative office at 
838-6200 for an application. 




B-l-N-G-0 

Lorraine Gris of Antioch participates with friends in a game of 
bingo at the Antioch Senior Center Jan. 17. —Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



Free Adoption Seminar 

Anyone contemplating adoption should 
attend this informational seminar 

Wednesday, February 2, 2000 7:00 P.M. 

Family Counseling Clinic 
19300 West Highway 120 • Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 

Infants and toddlers available from: 
China. Poland, Vinlnam, Bulgaria. Russia, India and Guatemala 

Space is limited, please call 847-223-8107 lo register 
or for more information ask for Ginny Mann. 



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Lindenhurst Early Childhood Center 








•Not combined wilh daycare 
•Weekly ihcmc related lesson plans 
'Qualified Teachers 
1 Socialization 'Computers 
•Phonics «Math «Art 'Science 



it 1 School hi Community 
Involvement in Like County 
• Special Wish • o'ni'si Speakers • Special Needs Awareness (MI)A) 

Foundation • "(iifl oRiiviiifi" Program • A Pen Pal from Around die World 
Sponsor • liiUTReiienilioual Activities • Started LV, ''Adopt a Family" Program 






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January 28,-2000 



NEIGHBORS 









Lakeland Newspapers] ' A7 




BORS 




Name: Steve Porch 

Home: Antioch 

Occupation: Assistant service man- 
ager, BMW, Lake Bluff 

Community involvement: Director 
of music, Lakes Area Community Band 

I'm originally from: 

Bedford, England 

I graduated from: Kneller Hall 
School of Music, Twickenham, England 

My family consists of: My wife, Barbara, myson, Bradley, and 
my daughters, Tracy and Elaine. 

My pets are: Jazz (dog), Cujo and Smokey (cats). 

What I like best about my town: The close community 
atmosphere. 

What I like best about my job: Interaction with people frorn 
all aspects of society. 

The secret to my success is: Work hard ami stay focused?:* 

I relax by: Playing piano and enjoying golf. 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: A busy community day 
(July 4, etc.). 

Last book I read: "Lost Moon" by Jim Lovell. 

FavoriteTV show is: "Seinfeld" 

Favorite movie is: "The Sting" 

\ Favorite music: All styles from classical to jazz. ... , 

Favorite band or musician: Oscar Petersen Gazz pianist). 

Favorite restaurant: Twin Oaks, Wilrhot, Wis. 

My life's motto is: Treat others as r like to be treated. 

If I could be anyone in history, I would be: Neil Armstrong 

If I won the lottery, I would: Set up college funds, then vaca- 
tion with family and relatives. 

My greatest accomplishments are: My marriage and family. 

J want to be remembered as: A nice person who was fun to be 

.^around. 

People who knew me in high school would say: I achieved 
.my objectives by hard work. 

*My pet peeve Isr People with bad manners. 

Most interesting person I ever met was: Jim Lovell from 
Apollo 13 

'■ My dream job would be: I had my dream job when I was a mu- 
sician on cruise ships. 

If I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Barbados! 



If you hauea "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Neal Tucker at 223-8161. 



■•r-.. vt-*~-— "*.' 




Bank-issued, FDIC-insured to $100,000 
1-year 6.4% APY* Minimum deposit $5,000 
3-year 6.8% APY* Minimum deposit $5,000 
5-year 6.95% APY* Minimum deposit $5,000 

"Annual Percentage Yield (APY) • Interest cannot remain on deposit; periodic payout of 
Interest Is required. Effective 1-28-00. 



Call or stop by today. 

EdwardJoneS® 

Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 



Antioch 

395-5444 
Marc Lubkcmaii 



Gurnee 

244-2199 
Brad Jenks 



Lindenhurst 

356-6272 
Boh Wickenkamp 



www. cd ward j ones . com 

Member SIPC 



PM&L Theatre offers 'Picasso* 



* "Picasso" Is ajming to Antioch. 

Well, sort of.' 2 ';■ , 

In a coup for Palette, Masque 
and Lyre ;(PM&L), Antloch's long 
standing ever popular community 
theater group, the Steve Martin 
comedy "Picasso at the Lapin Agile" 
will open the 21st century for the 
downtown theater. 

The premier showing runs Fri- 
days, Saturdays and Sundays, Feb. 4-6, 
11-13 and 18-20. Friday and Saturday 
performan ces are 8 p.m. with Sundays 



featuring a matineeat ;230 [p.m. 

Ken Smouse'of Antioch directs 
the production. 

Smouse's cast includes both fa- 
miliar and new faces to the PM&L ; 
stage. The two main characters are 
Picasso played by Rob Findlay of An- 
tioch and Albert Einstein portrayed 
by John Franco of Mundelein. 

Reservations can be made by 
phoning 395-3055 or by coming to 
the box office. Ticket prices are $10 
for adults and $8 for students. 



Eagle 50 plans casino trip 



. Feel lucky? 

First National Bank's Eagle 50 
; Traveler's Glub is offering a trip to 
"'Grand Victoria Casino Boat in Elgin 
on Mpnday^Feb. 2 1 . 

The casino boat trip includes 
two hours of gaming, buffet lunch, 
deluxe motor coach transportation 
and a professional escort 

The Grand Victoria is an 80,000 
square foot casino with ceilings 16 
feet high, making it the most spa- 
cious river boat in Illinois. 

Games offered on board include 

: blackjack,' Caribbean stud poker;' 

roulette, video poker and slot ma- 



chines for lots of fast-paced action. 

The Eagle 50 Travelers will depart 
First National Bank-Employee 
Owned located at 485 Lake SL in An- 
tioch parking lot at 9:45 a.m., return- 
ing at 5*30 p.m.Cost is $18 per person. 

The Eagle SOTravelers Club pro- 
vides a combination of seasonal day 
trips and discounted vacation pack- 
ages to Eagle 50 and Eagle 50-plus 
checking account members and 
their guests. 

For further information on Eagle 
50 Travelers or Grand Victoria Casi- 
no Trip, contact Nancy Rentner 838- 
2265. 



The Law Firm of 

FAVIL DAVID BERNS & ASSOCIATES 

Takes pleasure in announcing the hiring of a new Attorney: 

GERALD T. DIETZ 

Jerry Is dedicated to serving ihe needs of the community. He is a Lieutenant on the 

Round Lake Fire Department and lias been a Firefighter/Paramedic for over ten ycais. 

He also serves as a Commissioner on the Lake County Community Development 

Commission. Jerry is a graduate of the University of llllnoLs and received his 

law degree from The John Marsltall Law School. 

The, Firm also lakes pleasure In announcing the opening of their 

Lake County office at: 

369 N Cedar Lake Road 

Round Lake, Illinois 60073-3832 

(800)992-5299 

... . ^ Concqntratedin General Practice 

• CRIMINAL DEFENSE 

Felonies & Misdemeanors 



• PERSONAL INJURY 

Auto Accidents 
Wrongful Death 
Workers Compensation 

• TRAFFIC RELATED OFFENSES/DUI 

Overweight Truck Violations - CDL 
Summary Suspension Hearings 
Revokeo - Suspended Licenses 

•REAL ESTATE 
Buy, Sell & Lease 



• WILLS & POWER OF ATTORNEY 

Health Care & Property 

• PRORATE & ESTATE MATTERS 

• BUSINESS PLANNING 

• INCOME TAX 

Individual, Business & 
Electronic Filing 

•BANKRUPTCY 



GiH us today for an appointment 
Favil D. Bems • Louis A. Berns • Baron D. Harmon • Gerald T. Dietz 



Riverboatin' Your Way Back In Time 

by JIM WARNKEN, President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

Speeding along nt.6 mph on a .'river that meanders, loops, and bends, it 
takes almost 30 hours to cover a distance that would be only 100 miles by. 
car. One thing for sure. You're not on. the Concorde! 

But that's part of the charm of riverboatin' your way back a century. 
You soon forget you arc in the supersonic age and become part of a time 
when people were more interested in having fun getting from one place to 
another, rather than how long it took. 

•A trip on the Delta Queen brings us the illusion of that time Mark Twain 
so often wrote about. With her crystal chandeliers, stained glass transoms, 
cap picture windows and wedding-cake superstructure, this stately stem- 
wheeler plays the Victorian lady well. 

The lazy Mississippi cannot help but relax the most uptight 
businessman. But is there a chance of becoming bored? 

Only if you want to. The day's activities can include kite-flying 
contests, Mardis Gras parties-complete with costumes, daily shore 
excursions to plantation mansions. Dixieland bands, calliope concerts and 
movies. Don't expect the movies to be first run. Remember, we're back in 
the 19th-century. You're likely to sec old favorites like "Life on the 
Mississippi." 

Starvation is also unlikely on the Delta Queen. If breakfast, lunch and a 
five-course dinner are not enough, there is a midnight buffet to tide you over 
until, morning! 

There is one other riverboat making the overnight runs. It is the 
Mississippi Queen." While the Mississippi Queen may offer a few mpre 
creature comforts, the Delta Queen, built in 1929 and listed in the national 
register of historic places, more authentically recreates the atmosphere of the 
19th-century rivcrboats. 



<<*AV$g 



NORTH 




STAR 



CRUISES 

Lindenhurst 

www.northstartravel.com 



(847) 356-2000 




-r'3> 



Friday, Jan. 28 

7:30-8:30 a.m., Trie Business 
Networking Group meets at Copper f. 
Creek Grill, 950 Lake View Park- 
way (behind Hawthorne Mall) In 
Vemon Hiils, for Info., call pan at 
803-9904 during business hours 

Saturday, Jan. 29 

7 a.m.-ll p.m., Operation Snow- 
ball, a daylong event for teens by 
teens, held at Carmel High School. 
Cost is $18, for more info., call 
Mamie Holton at 327-6364 

Sunday, Jan. 30 

7-9 p.m., Open Gym at ACHS, 
cost $2 (adu!ts,only) $ ,. - 

'■ '"'• ' "■■ » 

7:30 p.m.',, PM&L Theatre holds 
auditions for teens ages 12-19 for 
the ReadeVsfTheatre presentation 
of "Voices 2000." For info., call 
395-3433 

Monday, Jan. 31 

12:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

6:45 p.m., Bingo at Antioch 
Moose Lodge, Rte. 173, 2 miles 
west of Antioch, info, at 395-9780 

7:30 p.m., Antioch Jaycees meet 
at Regency Inn, call 395-8035 

7:30 p.m., Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

Tuesday, Feb. 1 

6:45 p.m., Antioch VFW Bingo, 
doors open at 4:30 p.m., call 
395-5393 

7:30 p.m., St. Peter Council of 
Catholic Women meet at parish 
hall, call 395-0274 

U.S. National Snow Sculpting 
CharjpplpjTShip.heldjn.Lake^_ .„ „..i 
Geneva; Wis. as part of Wffiterf&t !f> 
2000 with music, ice carving, food ;• 
and more. For info, on the snow 
sculpting contest or any other part 
of the Winterfest, call 800-345- 
1020 or 262-248-4416 

7-8 p.m., Weigh to Win program 
held at Calvary Christian Center, 
Monavilie Rd„ west of Rte. 83 in 
Lake Villa. Call 356-6181 

Wednesday, Feb. 2 

A Safe Place/Lake.County Crisis 
Center, free support group for .1 
women victims of abuse meets in 
"Round Lake, call 249-4450 

VV* tt, *"T" UM V'*'*"'"'V- , " , "'""*"" r, *'"" , "'* # "'*''*' 

Sequoit Board of Directors meets 

6:30 p.m., TOPS Weight Loss 
weigh-in, 7 p.rn. meeting at Anti- 
och Senior Center, 817 Holbeck, 
info, at 395-6437 or 395-8143 

7-9 p.m., Northern Lake County 
Quitter's Guild meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in Lindenhurst, for 
info, call Valerie at 838-2126 

Thursday, Feb. 3 

First Kick Program, a 6-week non- . 
competitive Introduction to soccer 
for children and their parents 
taught by professional trainers 
held at Avon Center, N. Route 83 
in Lake Villa, $75/for 6 weeks. For 
details, call Mary at 587-7108 or 
visit www.furyacademy.com 

7 p.m., American Sewing Guild 
group "Running in Stitches meets 5 
at State Bank of the Lakes,. Lin- 
denhurst, call Janet at 265-7932 
or Chris at 548-8223 

8-9 a.m., Network Lake County, a 
business networking group, meets 
at In-Laws restaurant in Gumee, 
guests invited, call 548-5305 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed , , 
for all calendar requests. . 
Call223-8161 andaskfbr 
calendar assistance. Or e-mail 
calendar@lpnews. com 



*i 



'J ! U_...^jr.' ; .. 



A8/ Lakeland-Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



January 28, 2000 _ 



Just another day at the office 



The most dreaded piece of 
paper arrived at our house 
. the other day. It wasn't 
from the IRS or any other 
federal government agency. No, I 
am talking about the notice that 
comes home, via a child's backpack, 
on school stationary from the cafe- 
teria lady. 

Ah yes, it is the most feared, 
spine-chilling "lunchroom duty" 
notice. Most grown adults would 
rather serve on jury duty than 
attempt to present themselves in a 
reasonable fashion in the school 
cafeteria. At least in the courtroom 
you are among your peers — lunch- 
room duty leaves you at the total 
mercy of your children. It's a given 
that if you mess up setting the lunch 
tables or passing out the dessert of 
the day, you might as well join the 
Witness Protection Plan because 
your children will disown you quick- 
er than Jack the Ripper's mother. 

When my loving offspring, 
which I spent 12 hours in hard, back 
labor to deliver, found out which . 
day I was on for duty, the second- 
grader switched to cold lunch and 
the older one handed me an actual 
list of lunchroom do's and don'ts. 

Number 1: 1 was not to have 
direct eye contact with her. Number 
2: In no way was 1 to address her by 
anything other than her given 
name, if so felt the need to even 
speak- No "dearie, honey or sweet- 
ie" had belter pass over my lips 
while in her presence. Number 3: 
There was lo be no thumb licking 
and cheek wiping going on. The 
pressure was on. 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



On my chosen day I arrived 
extra early and my first job was to 
wash down the tables. I scrubbed 
them until they gleamed in the over- 
head florescent lights. My next task 
was to set each place setting. Even 
Martha Stewart would have been 
proud of my feeble attempt to fold 
.each napkin into the school mascot 
and line it up exactly as her "how to" 
book described. Next came the per- 
fectly laid out fork and spoon, and 
as I was pondering what to do for 
center pieces, I noticed time was 
running short. 

Would my children be ridiculed 
if their mother incorrectly set the 
table? Oh, maybe I should have fold- 
ed the napkins into origami swans? 
The stress of it all left my deodorant 
working overtime. 

As I held the last item to be 
placed at each setting in my hand, I 
knew that no matter how perfectly 
dressed the tables were I was in 
major trouble for I was clueless as to 
whether to place that little paper- 
wrapped straw on the left or the 
right side of the place setting. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

t 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



ENGAGEMENT 



Jonites/Stuart m 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter Jonites, Jr., Antioch announce 
the engagement of their daughter; Tracy Ellen Jonites, 
Chicago to Arthur Stuart 111, Oak Park, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur J. Stuart of Oak Park. 

The ceremony will be performed by Father Al 
Kirk of Ascension Church in Oak Park on May 6, 2000 

The bride-to-be is a 1909 graduate of Antioch 
Community High School and a 1993 graduate of 
University of Wisconsin and has a B/A Bachelor of 
arts degree in Human Behavior. She is employed as a 
Anaiyst-Human Resource for ADP in Elk Grove 
Village. 

The groom-to-be is a 1987-graduate of St. Joseph 
School and a 1992 graduate of Loyola University and 
has a B/S Biology degree in teaching. He is employed 
as a teacher at Driscoll Catholic High School in 
Addison. 

The couple plans to settle in Chicago. 




Arthur Stuart & Tracy Jonites 



Schubert/Champine 

Norm Schubert of Fox Lake announces the engage- 
ment of his daughter, Renee Schubert, Mundelein to 
Brad Champine of Gurnee, son of JoAnn Champine of 
Antioch and Jerry Champine of Chenoa. 

The ceremony will be performed by Rev. Dr. Craig 
Baldacci of Long Grove Community Church, Long 
Grove on May 6, 2000. 

The reception will be at Brae Loch Country Club in 
Grayslake. 

The maid-of-honor is Jarvis Barr of Smyrna, Term. 
Matron-of-honor will be Lisa Brandt of Kenosha, Wis. 

The best man will be Tom Brown of Wonder Lake. 

The bride-to-be is a 1988 graduate of Grant High 
School, Fox Lake and is attending Corcordia University. 
She is employed as a Administrative Sales representa- 
tive for Allegiance Healthcare in McGaw Park. 

The groom-to-be is a 1986 graduate of Warren 
Township High School and is attending the College of 
Lake County, Grayslake. He is employed as a truck dri- 
ver for Allegiance Healthcare in Waukegan. 

The couple plans to settle in Gurnee. 




Renee Schubert & Brad Champine 



Antioch library offers Saturday course to certify baby sitters 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



AiUiuch Public Library is offering 
a opportunity for young people to 
become "certified" baby-sitters. 

Michelle Cunningham, chil- 
dren's paraprofessionai at the 



library, is a certified instructor for 
baby-sitting. 

Plans are to offer this course on 
two consccuu've Saturday mornings 
once a minimum of 10 students are 
signed up. Red Cross requires stu- 
dents be at least age 1 1. 

Students do not have to reside 



within the library district to take the 
course. 

Cunningham admits sometimes 
parents automatically think a child 
knows how to baby-sit just because 
they have been around a baby. Tin's 
is certainly not always the case. 

The course has some flexibility, 



C/. 



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depending upon the age, back- 
ground and experience of die stu- 
dents going through the class. 

Fach chapter in the book con- 
tains both basic and extended 
lessons. This gives Cunningham an 
option of deciding how in depth to 
go with a particular class based 



2% UNDER PRIME FIXED 

JIM- MOUSE OR REFINANCE 



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Over a quarter century of experience 



somewhat by the needs exhibited 
along with the learning ability. 

The areas to be covered are con- 
tained within a book which the baby- 
sitter gets to keep following the class. 

Included in the safety area is 
bandaging wounds, when to call 911 
and rescue breathing are among the 
topics covered. 

Red Cross points out the rescue 
breathing portion of die course, 
although it uses some of the same 
techniques, does not result in the 
baby-sitters being CPR certified. 

Diapering and bottle feeding for 
younger babies is gone over, 

"My giving certification at the 
end of the course can be considered , 
my 'recommendation for this per- 
son," Cunningham said. "Basically it 
is saying I believe this person is 
responsible enough to take care of 
children." 

There is a 525 charge per person 
for die course. This covers the costs 
of the book and other materials dur- 
ing die course. 

For further information, or to 
register, stop by the library or call 
Cunningham at 395-0874.' 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

Steve Peterson 




easy in January 



T 



he friendly sports boss is 
still thawing out from the 
below-zero nights, so he 
asked the top two Cubs 
fans, a.Ica. sportswriters, to pinch 
hit for this week's Clipboard, 

So myself and our sports staffer, 
Rob Backus, trudged down to mingle 
with others who bleed Cubbie blue. 

The Cubs Convention is in its 
15th year, an event which is sold out 
months in advance at its Hilton Inn 
Towers location. A group from Wis- 
consin is 15-15 in attendance. 

"It's great for trie kids who are 
here. My husband's family has been 
Cub fans since the 1920s. His kids and 
now his great great grandkids are 
Cubs fans," Karen DeSruing said. 

A sports memorabilia dealer 
said he has attended most Cub 
Conventions, mosdy for publicity 
reasons. He attended one White Sox 
convention, but said, "you could 
put the number of fans there in a 
phone booth." 

"Because this is a family atmos- 
phere. This Is like a class reunion. 
There are friendships which start 
here and are resumed at Spring 
Training and opening day," said 
Wayne Messmer, known to fans as 
the best National Anthem singer. 

Messmer took the opportunity 
to sell his book, "Voice of Victory." 
He said initial response was "over- 
whelmingly positive. This is the de- 
but for the book," said Messmer. 

Messmer was the Opening Day 
anthem singer for a few years with 
the White Sox before coming over 
to Clark and Addison; ' 

Gary Pressy is another Wrigley 
tradition, He Is the one behind the 
Lowrey organ. The organ at the ball- 
park was the Orst when Wrigley Field 
started the now staple. He is ready for 
newsongsforthenew Cubs. 

"With Eric Young, you can play, 
"Feel Young" or for Bill Greene, 
"Eyes and Apples of Greene." Ricky 
Guietterez may be tougher, 
though," said Pressy. 

"For Mark Grace, it is not so 
much 'Amazing Grace," but 'Taking 
Care of Business' from his movie. 
When I play that last year, he would 
wave to me," Pressy said. 

Today's organ music just is not 
the same as day's gone by. 'Tech- 
nology has taken over. The rhythm 
is not there In today's music All the 
ballparks play the same," he said. 

He told the story of how "Hey 
Hey, Holy Macrol", the 1969 theme 
song, was founded. "It was June 
and we were riding high. It was part 
from Jack Brickhouse's 'hey hey* 
and Vince Lloyd's Holy Macorol," 
Pressy said. 

Ferguson Jenkins, Hall of Famer 
and owner of six 20-win seasons at 
Wrigley, has a thought of two of the 
convention's success. 
■ "It is because of WGN. Fans 
want to get up close to the players," 
Jenkins said. 

Cub fan Joe Pratt grew up 
watching the likes of Andy Pafko, 
Bob Rusch, CliffStine, Cal McClish, 
HankSauer, and Dutch Leonard in 
the 1940s and 1950s. 

Even after a 67-win season, 
there was still a feeling of optimism 
from the current Cubs. 

"I'm looking for consistency.lt 
will be great to play for Don Baylor. 
He always has his team ready to 
play. I'm also looking forward to 
working with Acosta (pitching • 
coach)," starter Jon Lieber said. 

And with Baylor at the helm 
and a good mix of veterans and new 
faces, maybe we should be excited 
as well. 

Steve Peterson can be reached at 
(847)223-8161, ext. 155; fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at 
edit@lnd.com. 



SPORTS 




*-. - ■■>, .'-' -- 



January 28, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 



Sequoit bowlers finding their groove on the alley-ways 



By JOHN PHELPS 

Sports Editor 

Things have a way of coming 
around. 

Such is the case for the Antioch 
girls varsity bowling team, which has 
been on a hot streak as of late. 

"We came outa little flat after the 
winter break and didn't bowl well at 
Prospect or Fenton," said head 
coach Steve Haenchen. "But we've 

• knuckled down and practiced hard. 
The team has really done a nice job 
of focusing." 

A nice drive indeed, which in- 
cludes a current three-game winning 
streak that sees the Sequoits current- 
ly in a virtual tie for second place in 
the North Suburban with 34 points. 

And it all began last Tuesday 
with a 2,585-1,762 victory over North 
Chicago at Antioch Lanes. 

Junior Melissa Hansen paced the 
winners with a 540 series (five 
games), including a high game of 
190. Amanda Cowgill, another ju- 
nior, rolled a 530 series with a 203 
high game and sophomore Susan 
Carlson, competing in her first varsi- 
ty match, rolled a 513 series that in- 

• eluded a 189 high game. 

Team leader and captain, senior 
Robin Walczak, added a 505 series 
with a 190 high game and sopho- 
more Sarah Schroeder fired a 497 se- 
ries with a 179 high game. 

"It's always nice when a 497 se- 
ries is the low for your team," added 
Haenchen. "I like those kind of days- 
we were pretty solid." 

The following day, Antioch kept 




Antioch's Sarah Schroeder gets ready to fire one down the alley 
as the Sequoits warmup for a match against North Chicago. 
—Photo by Steve Young. 



up the winning ways in downing vis- 
iting Grayslake, 2,404-2,109. Consis- 
tency was again the key for the Se- 
quoits as Schroeder rolled a 523 se- 
ries with a 182 high game and 
Hansen was right behind with a 52L 
series and 187 high game. Walczak 
tallied a 476 series with a 182 high 
game, sophomore Jackie Feldman 
(447 series, 166 high game), and 
Cowgill struggled to a 436 series, 
which included a 181 high game. 

Antioch then completed the 
week's sweep by downing Stevenson 
at. Hawthorn Lanes, 2,559-2,329, a 



match wiiich saw the Sequoits toss a 
team-best high game of 902 (in the 
second game). 

In that game, Cowgill and Wal- 
czak were on fire as each fired a 213 
and Abbigail Thomas came In right 
behind with a 201, all high games for 
each bowler In the match. Mean- 
while, Hansen posted a 141 and 
Schroeder a 134. 

"We always feel comfortable at 
Hawthorn," added Haenchen. "It's 
kind of like our home away from 
home. The girls really settled in dur- 
ing the first game. Amanda, Robin 



and Abbigail each had tremendous 
scores (in the second game)." 

Haenchen said that Cowgill and 
Walczak each strung several strikes 
together after starting off with splits. 

And speaking of strikes, Walczak 
currently holds the highest average 
on the team at 170. 

"She probably throws more 
strikes than anyone on the team," 
said Haenchen of his three-year var- 
sity bowler. 

"She has a tendency to carry her- 
self well. The thing is, when she gets 
hot, she stays hot!" 

Walczak's high series this year 
was a 622 earlier in the campaign. 
She later followed with a 610, mark- 
ing her second 600-or-higher series 
of the season. 

Haenchen said that Hansen is 
good at picking up spares and is very 
consistent 

Hansen's series-best this year 
was a 491 with a high game of 197 
while Thomas' high series was a 581 
with a 202 high game. CowguTs high 
series was 529 with a 213 high game 
(last week) and Schroeder*s best in- 
cludes a 414 high series to go along 
with a 157 high game. 

"We're just trying to put togeth- 
er a nice drive towards the end," said 
Haenchen. 

With numbers like that, look for 
good things come this Friday's North 
Suburban Conference Meet, which 
will commence at Hawthorn Lanes 
in Vernon Hills at 9 a.m. 

The sectionals will also be held at 
Hawthorn Saturday, February 5 at 9 
a.m. 



Balance the name of the game for Lady Sequoit team 



By JOHN PHELPS 
Sports Editor 



Whatever the endeavor, having 
balance is always a good thing. 

In the case of the Antioch girls 
varsity basketball team, balance has 
been hard to come by this season on 
the hardwood. 

However, If last week was any in- 
dication, balance is in the foresee- 
able future if not already prevalent. 

That's because the Sequoits im- 
proved to 6-14 overall and 3-6 in the 
NSC after posting two victories. 

It all started last Tuesday when 
Antioch posted a 48-35 victory over 
North Chicago. A tight game 
throughout, Antioch held a 29-23 ad- 
vantage after three quarters before 
pulling away In the final frame. 

"Once we got the lead, they 



(North Chicago) really started com- 
ing after us," said head coach Dave 
Woods. "In the past, we haven't re- 
sponded to well to the pressure de- 
fense. Tonight however, we played a 
solid second half. We limited our 
turnovers and made free-throws 
down the stretch." 

Shelley Wolfgram, who account- 
ed for 6-6f-6 free- throws down' the 
stretch to preserve the lead, poured 
in a game-high 18 points while Erica 
Brown added nine. 

Antioch then took care of Zlon- 
Benton Saturday to the time of 50-42. 

"Undoubtedly our best effort of 
the year," noted Woods. "We didn't 
get off to a very good start but from 
the second quarter on, we showed 
what we're capable of doing." 

Antioch had trailed 26-14 in the 
second quarter before the hosts put 



on a 10-0 run to close out the half 
down by only two, 26-24. 

"That run ignited us," said 
Woods. "We carried it over into the 
second half. We played with a lot of 
excitement and enthusiasm." 

Woods also attributed the sec- 
ond-half surge to switching defens- 
es, which helped shut down two of 
the Zee-Bees best scorers, which re- 
sulted in Antioch outscoring Zion 15- 
8 in the third quarter and thus es- 
sentially taking control of the game. 

Wolfgram and Brown led the 
way with 16 and 11 points, respec- 
tively. Amy Mueller also stepped up 
her game by chipping in with 10 
points and Meredith Nelson added 
seven. Both are just sophomores. 

"Shelley is starting to play with a 
lot of confidence," said Woods. "Alot 
of the girls are really starting to assert 



themselves and that's what we need. 
Everyone feeds off of that. AU, of the 
girls are starting to understand what 
their roles are on the team." 

Free-throw shooting was also on 
the upside as the Sequoits converted 
on 21-of-32 attempts. 

"We're just looking to take it to 
the next level," added Woods. "We'd 
just like to be competitive with some 
of the better teams in the area. I don't 
really look at our record as a barom- 
eter as to how we're doing-as long as 
go out and play a good game and 
protect the ball-the other will take 
care of itself. We are definitely im- 
proving and headed in the right di- 
rection." 

Antioch will try and take anoth- 
er step in the right direction when it 
hosts Mundelein Saturday in a 2;30 
p.m. NSC matchup. 



ACHS grapplers gearing up for stretch run, regionals 



The regionals are nearing and 
that means fine-tuning time in 
the world of high school 
wrestling. 

The Antioch varsity wrestlers are 
definitely getting some good tests as 
of late as the push for getting as 



many qualifiers to state has begun 
taking shape. 

On Friday, the Sequoits lost a 
grueling heartbreaker to conference 
rival Stevenson 34-33. 

The Sequoits held a 33-28 
advantage before having to for- 



ATHLETE OF THE WEEK 




Lackey 



Nome: Don - 
Lackey 
School: Anti- 
och 

Sport: Basket- 
ball 

Yean Senior 
tost week's 
stats: The 6'5 



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Nome: Shelley 
Wolfgram 
School: Anti- 
och 

Sport: Basket- 
ball 

YearsSopho- 
more 
Last week's 



forward broke out of a scoring 
slump by pouring in 21 points as 
Antioch halted a three-game skid 
after downing Grant Tuesday . 



stats: Scored 40 over three games 
three games last week as the Se- 
quoits went 2-1. 



felt the heavyweight division, 
leading to the final margin of de- 
feat. 

Non-forfeit winners included; 
Ryan Schuster at 103 pounds; Tom- 
my Hart (112); Bill Damron (125); 
Ryan Hlinak (140); Thor Svvanson 
(152); Steve Oliver (160); Robbie 
Zerbst (171); and, Tom Chilcote 
(189). 

The following day, Antioch com- 
peted in the Round Lake quad. The 
Sequoits posted a 45-25 victory over 
the host Panthers but then fell to 
Grant 37-30. 

Against Round Lake, two' forfeit 
wins in the first two divisions got the 
Sequoits off to a 12-0 start 

Dan Gibson (119 pounds) then 
pinned Mike Parker at 5:27 as the Se- 
quoits were well on their way to the, 
non-conference victory. 

Jack Lorang (135) earned a victo- 
ry after pinning his opponent at 2:19 
followed by a Hlinak's 6-2 decision 
two matches later. 



Swanson (152) and Chilcote 
(189) took forfeit wins before Jeff 
Giemoth (215) put the Sequoits up 
45-25 after pinning Ivan Avakian at 
the two minute mark. 

After falling behind 28-9 against 
Grant, the Sequoits staged a furious 
rally, winning six of the final seven 
matches. 

Tommy Hart posted an 8-7 deci- 
sion at 1 1 2 pounds, followed by a for- 
feit win by Gibson at 1 19. 

Hlinak then improved to 23-1 on 
the year after downing Robert Reyes, 
11-4. 

Swanson followed with a 9-8 
decision; Steve Oliver (160 
pounds) then pinned his oppo- 
nent at 2:30; Robbie Zerbst also 
collected a 9-8 decision; and, to 
cap off the comeback was Gier- 
noth (215), who won by fall just 
1:11 into his match. 

Antioch will compete in the 
North Suburban meet this Saturday 
at Stevenson beginning at 9 a.m . 



A 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



January 28, 2000 







(Stats, news and such from the world oj colleges, high schools, youths, etc...,) 



Basketball 

Saturday's results 
North Suburban 

North Chicago 50, Antioch 49 
Lake Forest 49, Zion-Benton A'\ 
Warren 45, Stevenson 39 
Libertyville 50, Mundelein 49 
Non-conference 
Grant 55, Highland Park 52 
Rolling Meadows 69, Round Lake 33 

Girls basketball 

Monday's results 
Non-conference 

Carniel 50. Grant 42 

Saturday's results 

ESCC 

Marian Catholic 30, Carmel 33 

Fox Valley 

Grayslake 69, C.L South 47 

Caty-Grove43, C.L Central 27 

Dundee-Crown 57, Woo'dstock 29 

Lake Zurich 20, Prairie Ridge 24 

McHenry 50, Jacobs 43 

North Suburban 

Libertyville 55, Warren 34 

Antioch 50, Zion-Benton 42 

Non-conference 

Wauconda 55, Harvard 29 

BOYS AREA 
BASKETBALL STANDINGS 
Overall 
Johnsburg 9-2 

Warren 12-5 

Grayslake 12-6 

Lake Zurich 11-6 

Mundelein 10-9 

Antioch 8-10 

Carmel 7-12 

Libertyville 6-12 
Independents 

Grant 9-6 

Round Lake 4-13 

Wauconda 3-11 

GIRLS AREA 
BASKETBALL STANDINGS 
Overall 
Grayslake 18-4 

Libertyville 15-5 

Lake Zurich 9-4 

Johnsburg 9-6 

Carmel 13-10 

Mundelein 9-9 

Warren 10-12 

Antioch 6-15 

Independents 
Round Lake 15-6 

Wauconda 9-8 

Grant 8-13 

Note; Records through Monday's 
games. 

Girls basketball 
Regional p airings 
Stevenson sectional 
Mon., Feb. 14 



Game 1 — (17) North Chicago at (16) 
Antioch 

Game 2 — (15) Wheeling at (I) Steven- 
son 

Game 3 — (9) Round Lake at (8) Warren 
Game 4 — (13) Grant at (4) Lake Zurich 
Game 5 — (12) Zion-Benton at (5) 
Waukegan 
f ue., Feb. IS 

Game 6 — Winner Game 1 at (2) Buffalo • 
Grove 

Game 7 — ( 10) Lake Forest (H.S.) at (7) 
Carmel 

Game 8 — (14) Wauconda at (3) Liber- 
tyville 

Game 9 — (1 1} Mundelein (H.S.) at (6) 
Grayslake 
Thu.,Fcb.l7 

Game 10 — Winner Game 2 vs. Winner 
Game 3 

Game 1 1 — Winner Game 4 vs. Winner 
Game 5 

Game 1 2 — Winner Game 6 vs. Winner 
Game 7 

Game 13 — Winner Game 8 vs. Winner 
Game 9 

Mon., Feb. 21 

Game 14 — Winner Game 10 vs. Winner 
Game 11 

Game 15 — WinnerGame 12 vs. Winner 
Game 13 
Thu., Feb.24 

Game 16 — WinnerGame 14 vs. Winner 
Game 15 

Youth Beat 

College of Lake County 

Grade School Cheer-off 

results 

Final results/points 
(8th grade div.) 

Viking School, Gurnee-295; North- 
wood Junior High, Highland Park-287; 
Woodland Middle School, Gurnee-271; 
Shepard Junior High, Deerfield-261 .5; St. 
Gilbert School, Grayslake-256.5; Carl 
Sandburg Middle School, Mundclein- 
254; Daniel Wright Junior High, Lin- 
colnshire-251.5; Central Junior High, 
Zion-230.5; St. Bede School, Ingleside- 
226.5. 

Final results/points 
(7 Ui grade div.) 

Woodland Middle School, Gurnee- 
299.5; St. Gilbert School, Grayslake-269; 
St. Bede School, Ingiesidc-264; Immacu- 
late Conception, Waukegan-240. 

Blaze capture first 

The Lindenhurst boys ll-io 
travel team won first place in indoor 
soccer at KITS in lake Zurich with a 5-1- 
1 record. The Blaze narrowly beat out sec- 
ond-place Warren United by three points 
in the standings, which also included 
teams from Lake Zurich and Buffalo 
Grove. 

For the season, the Blaze scored 25 



goals while allowing only 15. Kurt 
Houghton and Colin O'Malley led the 
Blaze in scoring with 10 and sue goals, re- 
spectively, while Kyle Sytsma dished out 
nine assists. The defense was led by Brian 
Hook, Andrew Stein and Brian Mooney 
witii midfielders Ronnie Herout, Connor 
p'Keefe and Ethan Halin controlling the 
ball in the middle, 

Goalies Tommy Sevvart, Matt Laine 
and Stein stopped their opponents with 
. numerous brilliant saves with an excel- 
lent goal against average of 2.1 . 

Basketball 

it was a great season on the hard- 
wood forThe Antioch Upper Grade 
School eighth-grade girls basket- 
ball team. 

Season highlights for the Apaches 
included \vinning the Northwest Grade 
School Conference title, the regional 
championships, and the Grass Lake 
Tournament. 

Individual highlights included Jen- 
nie Devvar, who was awarded die Best 
All-around Player Award. Dewar was the 
team's high scorer for the season with o 
14 points per game average and was also 
named to the All-Tournament Team at 
The Grass Lake Tourney for the second 
consecutive year. 

Other players honored included 
Can dace Pierce, who was a good re- 
bounder and ran the fast break; Bonnie 
Henntng for being a team leader and 
good rebounder; CassieTurzy for being 
a smart defensive player; Brynn Schvva- 
ba, who ran the offense and was named 
the Best Defensive Player at The Grass 
Lake Tourney; and, Katie Hofeldt, a sev- 
enth-grader who was moved up for 
tournament. Hofeldt was recognized for 
her good rebounding and play in the 
low- post. 

Other key players for the Apaches 
included the likes of Katie Boird, 
Meghan Bartz, Kristy Burgess, Julia Cer- 
mak, Rachel DeBoer, Katy Fries, Jessi 
Gordon, Danielle O'Young, and Becky 
Tucker. 

The head coach of the Apaches is 
Cher'ee Molitor, who passes along her 
best to (he girls. Antioch High School 
will be looking forward to seeing this all- 
star team in the not-to-distant future. 

Meanwhile, the seventh-grade 
girls team also turned in an exceptional 
season, which included an undefeated 
(14-0) conference championship. 

Katie Hofeldt was the teams scor- 
ing leader and Amanda Steiskal was the 
teams defensive star. Loren Scarbor- 
ough ran the point to perfection. 

Other team members included 
Ashley Siwula, Katie Eaton, Rachel Ke- 
mer, Melissa Mullan, Kelly Inman, Holly 
Roberts, Kristen Baiocchi, Jody Crivello, 
Leslie Collins, Stephanie Lcafblad, 




Chili Open 
Golf Tournament 

Saturday, February 12, 2000 
Brae Loch Golf Course, Grayslake 

•Challenge Old Man Winter To Nine Holes 
•Enjoy An All-You-Can-Eat Chili Lunch. 
•Take Home Door Prizes & Awards 

Only $25 per person. 
Pre-paid registration required. 

Call (847) 223-5542 
to reserve your foursome. 

Special Prizes for Rest Dressed Dapper & Daffy Duffers 



^% LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES 
^ Preservation, Restoration, Education and Recreation 




Blazing the Competition 

The Lindenhurst Blaze boys U-10 travel soccer team claimed first 
place in the KITS held in Lake Zurich. The Blaze consists of, bot- 
tom row (left to right) Matt Laine, Brian Mooney, Connor O'Keefe, 
Colin O'Malley, and Kyle Sytsma. Middle row (l-r) is Andrew Stein, 
Kurt Houghton, Brian Hook, Ethan Hahn, Ronnie Herout, and Tom- 
my Sewart. Back row (l-r) are coaches Tom Mooney, John Sytsma 
and Bill Houghton. Not pictured-Alex Kelley— -Submitted photo. 



Amanda Statu, Megan Placko, Rachel 
Finkelberg, Alyssa Casey, Rachel Theil, 
and Gin a Florian. 

Congratulations to both teams and 
here's to continued future success! 

College Sports Beat 

Junior outside midfielder Jill De- 
no m a of Lake Villa (Carmel II.S.) was 

the winner of the Illinois Wesleyan Uni- 
versity women's soccer team "Outstand- . 
ing Leadership Award," it was an- 
nounced. Denoma tallied three goals and 
three assists last fall for the Lady Titans, 
who finished the 1999 campaign with a 
12-6 record. 

Meanwhile, teamate Liz Dowries 
of Harrington (Carmel II.S.) and also 
a junior, was one of the offensive 
weapons this post season, accounting for 
15 points. Both were letterwinners for 
1WU tliis season. 

Augustana College freshman Bran- 
don Vahl of Lindenhurst (Waukegan H.S.) 
placed first in the 800 run with a time of 
2:0235 as the Vikings won five events at 
the UW-Platteville Open Indoor Track 
Meet last weekend. 

Aja Brown of The College of 
Lake County poured in 15 points and 
grabbed 8 rebounds in the Lady 
Lancers 6B-38 loss to McHenry last 
week. Head coach Bill Braman said the 
team's field goal shooting was the dif- 
ference. Corrie Svendson then netted 
21 points and Brown 18 to go along with 
9 rebounds as the Lady Lancers Im- 
proved to 6-13 (2-3) In the Skyway Con- 
ference following their 63-<l9 victory 



over vLake Forest JV. 

Svendson then netted 1 9 points and 
snared eight rebounds in a 79-60 loss to 
Kishwaukee over the vveeknd.Tied 34-34 
at haJftime, Kishwaukee opened the sec- 
ond half with a ] 0-0 run and never looked 
back. CLC fell to 6-14 overall. " X 

Jim NUlcs pumped In 34 points, in- 
cluding 8 three-pointers, as the CLC 
mens basketball team fell to McHenry 88- 
R0. Aaron Coleman added 25 points and 
8 rebounds for Lake County, which had 
fought back from a 2 1 -point deficit to cut 
the lead to two with four minutes re- 
maining. The Lancers currently stand at 
1-19, 0-5 in the Skyway. 

For his efforts, Aaron Coleman was 
named The College of Lake County Ath- 
lete of The Week. Coleman averaged 24 
poi nts and 10 rebounds; including 1 1-of- 
12 free-throws against McHenry. For the 
season. Coleman is averaging 15 points 
and seven rebounds. 

Local Sports Digest 

The Lindenhurst Faslpltch 

Softball team is still looking for 14- 
and-under players for the upcoming 
season. Note: Players are still eligible 
if their 15th birthday falls after Janu- 
ary 1. 

Contact directors Steve Haenchen 
(265-0749) or Mitch Kotlarz (356-9547) or 
manager Jim Kulakowski (265-02"22) far 
further details. 

Team practices are presently held 
every Saturdayfrom 10 o.m.-3 p.m. at B.J. 
Hooper School off Sand lake Rd. in lin- 
denhurst. 



To give us 

HOT NEWS TIPS 

call Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number 

or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check it out! 




What are you doing 
Saturday Night? 

o<tt LIGHTHOUSE 

P t5 Church of Antioch 



Relevant Messages . Uplifting Music 
Family Friendly Atmosphere w/Nursery provided 



Services begin at 7pm on SATURDAYS. 

We are located at 554 Parkway in Antioch, IL 

(1 block W. of Rt. 83 off of North Ave.) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: (847) 838-0616 

Pastor Tom Bartmer 

'pUfclttg the Zsifkncjs tollh the, light cfc /}e*us ChtUl! 






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\ January 28, 2000 



- 



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A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 

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Games and riddles 
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Section 




Lakeland Newspapers January 28-Febmary 3, 2000 




in a million 



Man's desire to 'help leads to service as a 
bone marrow donor for unknown recipient 



ByMICHAELRBABICZ 

Community Editor 




, one million. These are the odds of a per- 
1 lational bone marrow donor registry to 
-relative. 

-old father of two from Antioch, has re- 
mtch. 

i recipient is 51 -years-old, a male and lives 
fqrrua^Cotill said. 
Since sighing up for the bone marrow donor program in 
1996, Coull has received two calls telling him he is a match. 
The first came last spring. "The first match was between 



What ifsoniethhigrhda Ijtlfflwii? 
Is it going to tm\mU\fu\T 

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lionvnitimwrtloiivr 



myself and another person," Coull explained. "The other per- 
son was the closer match, so they kept me as a stand by." 

"This time when I received the call, 1 was told I am THE 
match," Coull recalled. "It usually takes two-three months to 
get everything done. They're speeding up the process and it's 
only taking about a month." 

Coull's scheduled to have the procedure done as an out- 
patient on Feb. 15 by Dr. Leonard M. Klein, M.D. at Lutheran 
General Hospital in Park Ridge. 

"The recipient is in dire need," Coull said, admitting his 
knowledge of the man is purposely kept limited. The same is 
true regarding Coull's information passed on to the recipient's 
family. 

At the one year anniversary of the procedure, if both par- 
ties agree and sign off granting permission, the donor and re- 
cipient are able to exchange information. Direct contact be- 
tween the two is allowed at that time. 

"We can get a card and send it through UfeSource," Coull 
said. "I'm hoping it works." 




Prior to the procedure, Coull has given two pints of blood. 
This will be given to him following the procedure, which will 
allow him to recuperate quickly. 

The former president of the Antioch Vikings Junior Foot- 
ball program, Coull works as a screw machine specialist at J.B. 
Jensen & Son machinery in Fox Lake. 

"Jim Jensen, the father and founder of the company, 
passed away around a year ago 
from cancer," Coull explained. Please see ONE / B2 



■ _-: 




;:" 




racing interest 



Neal Coull, who will undergo a procedure to donate 
bone marrow Feb. 15, plays a game with his daugh- 
ters Dana, 15, and Taylor, 8, not pictured, and his wife 
Tina, also not pictured, at their Antioch home. —Pho- 
to by Sandy Bressner 

The procedure takes about two hours. Coull will be under 
general anesthesia. Two doctors willinsert needles Into the 
hip areas. 

"The nurse told me they may have to insert the needles as 
many as 75- 100 times to get enough of the blood which holds 
the stem cells," Coull said with a. chuckle, admitting he is "not 
a needles person." 

"I'll be under anesthetic, so it won't matter," Coull added. 



■ 
I 



i. 



It began with an interest in auto racing. 

Neal Coull heard about National Association of Stock 
Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) team owner Rick Hendrick 
was battling leukemia, 

Coull and his family took a trip to IrTdianapoils Mo- 
tor Speedway ibr the NASCAR race. VVhiie there, they 
were walking through the souvenir trailers and came 
upon a tent set up for people to register to be bone mar- 
row donors. 

"I've always like racing," Coull explained. "I heard 
about Hendnck's problem arid being mvblved with pro-." 
■ motirig bone marrow donations. We decided that ivas 
the least 'we could do/* 

Both Coulland His wife, Kristine, signed .up and gave . 
some blood needed forthe registration. 
: ; That was the summer of 1997, ; 

That started the ball rolling for Coull to be called 
when he was twice found to be adonormatch 

Persons interested in registering to be a.doriorcart 
contact LifeSource Blood Services, 1205K Milwaukee 
jAve., Gleriviev^ : 803r7950.< Eileen M.Bfalas is the bone 
marrow coordinator. 



1 



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Celebrating 50 years of service to the community. 
Our Golden Anniversary brings you Golden Opportunities. ' 

"Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure" 
MEMBER FDIC • EQUAL HOUSING LENDER 




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Now, we're proud to say that our internal 
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In accordance with the guidelines set forth by 
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Year 2000 date change. 



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• ■ . i i I • I t t 



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»' » t l' t « ■ " ■ ' ' ' ' > " ' ' I ■ 








/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 28, 2000 



FROM PAGE Bl 

ONE— 2 - 



"That's been kind of an incentive for 
me. I would've done anything to 
help Jim," 

"Now I've got an opportunity to 
do something to help someone, 
even if it is a stranger," Coull said. 

"I don't know anything about 
his background, but maybe he 
might live a longer life with my cells 
producing blood in him," Coull said. 
"I can't think of not being around to 
see my daughters marry or baby-sit 
my grandchildren." 

Coull has received support from 
his family to have the procedure 
done. Coull's wife, Kristine, and two 
daughters, Dana, 15, and Taylor, 8, 
have both been supportive. 

"The kids don't get the whole 
picture, but they're still proud," 
Coull said. "For Taylor, our 
youngest, she's a little scared and 
nervous because we're talking about 
dad having an operation." 

"I have lots of fears," Coull ad- 
mits. "I'm nervous, too. What if 
something does happen? Is it going 
to be painful?" 

If Coull desires, he will receive 
pain medication to help him be 
more comfortable following the pro- 
cedure. Missing work Wednesday 
through Friday, with the weekend, 
Coull expects to be back to work the 
following Monday. 

"They tell me I'll be a little stiff 
and sore for four to six weeks," Coull 
said. "That's nothing compared to 
what he and his family have already 
gone through regarding chemother- 
apy, then having to essentially live in 
a bubble for four to six months to 
cut down on the risk of infection 
with the family praying at his side 
that it works." 

"I just want to make sure it 
goes well, with no complications," 



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Neal Coull has some apprehen- 
sion about donating bone mar- 
row , though he says he feels 
driven to help. —Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



Coull explained. 

Coull's mother, Bea Coull from 
Fox Lake, and grandmother, Ruby 
Hylton from Chicago, are "excited 
and proud." Each has had their 
share of questions, mainly because 
not a lot is known about the proce- 
dure. 

"It's my family's way of repay- 
ing," Coull revealed. "My uncle had 
a liver transplant. Somebody had to 



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die for him to live. I don't have to die 
to help someone." 

"Like they say, what goes - 
around, comes around," Coull 
said. "Eventually, it'll come back 
again. 

Some people Coull has talked 
with say there is no way they could 
go through something like this. 

"It's amazing there are not 
more people who match and more 
people willing to be donors," Coull 
said. "Why should someone have to 
die if someone can be a match for 
them." ' 

Likening it to his motivation for 
coaching football, Coull sees his 
willingness to be a donor as "just 
something you do." 

"My biggest fear is to go through 
all of this and it won't work," Coull 
admits. "That's one of the reasons . 
they won't let you contact the recip- 
ient They say there is an emotional 
bond which develops." 

"It can be a large emotional let- 
down if it doesn't work," Coull said. 
"For what we do as donors is noth- 
ing compared to what they do as re- 
cipients." 

Should the procedure not work, 
or partially work, Coull may get 
called back to give marrow through 
a different procedure called PBSC 
collection. This procedure uses a 
machine which takes the blood 
from one arm, passes it through a . 
collector which collects white cells 
containing stem cells, then returns 
the red cells and plasma to the 
donor's other arm. 

The possibility of going through 
the second donation does not both- 
er Coull. 

"If a fellow person needs help 
and I can help, it's part of my hu- 
man responsibility," Coull said. . 
"You do what you can. That was 
part of my upbringing.' Our family 
is close. We're all there for each 
other. No matter what, I can turn 
around and a support system will 
be there." 

"He (the recipient) needs my 
help," Coull emphasized. "It's the 
least I can do to give to him some 
marrow. Maybe someday it'll be me, 
my daughters, my wife or some oth- 
er family member who needs help." 

"There's always somebody, 
somewhere, who's helping some- 
one," Coull said. 



Think I'm funny? I really 
kill 'em when I'm 




g! 



Okay, readers, it's time for a 
little pop quiz: which Of 
the following quotations 
is taken from a real story 
that made hews headlines recently: 

1. "Cartoon aliens abducted me, im- 
planted an electrode in my brain, 
and then ordered me to be like Jer- 
ry/" said the man, explaining why 
he chose to become part-owner and 
head of basketball operations for the 
second-to-worst team in basket- 
ball. . .the Washington Wizards. 

2. "He told me to sing with him or he 
would throw me off a bridge," said 
the politician, explaining why he hu- 
miliated himself by attempting to 
show his "fun side" and singing an 
Irish song with Ted Kennedy in front 
of a group of people who were not 
tone deaf. 

3. "There's no way I could do that, 
not intentionally. I loved her." the 
man testified, as part of his defense 
claiming he must have been sleep- 
walking (for about 45 minutes), and 
while asleep he stabbed his wife 44 
times, dragged her body to the pool 
and held her under, cleaned up, 
changed clothes and stashed the 
dirty clothes and murder weapon in 
the wheel well of his car. - 

While I personally think that if 
quotations No. 1 and No. 2,were 
true, they would explain a lot, I must 
admit I made them up. The answer 
is No. 3, and it is yet another 
demonstration of how reality is 
stranger than fiction. 

That quote came during the tes- 
timony of a 43-year-old Phoenix 
man, Scott Falater, who was recently 
convicted of the first-degree murder 
of his wife. Thanks In no small part 
to a neighbor who witnessed the 
murder, the jury was not able to 
swallow this man's story, despite his 
emotional testimony. 

As an ex-sleepwalker myself, I, 
too, find his story very hard to be- 
lieve. From my own childhood expe- 
riences with sleepwalking, which 
went on infrequently over a few 
years, I remember in several in- 
stances dreaming I was awake. . .and 
then physically acting it out. 

For example, I loved TV as a kid, 
and apparently didn't get enough 
while I was awake, so I started 
watching it while I was asleep, too. 
My mother had a television in her 
bedroom, and I would sleepwalk 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

i- j 

Donna Abear 



into her room and sit myself down 
on the floor in front of her TV. . 
Though these nighttime visits from 
"Zombie Donna" may have given 
my mother the occasional "heart at- 
tack," she somehow survived. 

After a while, she even found my 
sleep antics entertaining, especially 
the time she found me in the 
kitchen, making what I must have 
thought was a tuna sandwich, ex- 
cept that I was using canned cat 
food, instead. She said she watched 
me make the sandwich, and found \ 
the whole thing so funny she almost 
let me eat it. 

Now I'm wondering If Mom 
even found the incident funny 
enough to report it to sleep re- 
searchers, The reason I say this is 
because after hearing about the 
sleepwalking murder case, I did 
some further reading about sleep- 
walking, and in one of the articles I 
came across, they actually stated 
that "one sleepwalker was even 
known to make cat food sandwich- 
es." This tells me one of two things: 
cat food sandwich-making is either 
a popular sleepwalking pastime; or 
Mom has a big mouth. 

However, what's got me even 
more worried than Mom's possible 
inability to "keep the cat in the bag- 
gie" is this: what if that man really 
WAS sleepwalking when he mur- . 
dered his wife? While it does not 
seem very likely, no one can really 
say for sure. The possibility exists, 
however remote, that normally non- 
violent people may commit violent 
acts while sleepwalking. 

I discussed this idea with my 
husband, who then wondered jf he 
should maybe be just a little ner- 
vous, considering my past history of 
sleepwalking. But I assured him that 
in all likelihood, he's perfectly safe. 

Our cat, on the other hand, 
might do well to hide the Meow Mix. 

Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, Antioch, II 60002, 



PM&L presents 'Picasso at the Lapin Agile 1 



PM&L opens the 21st century at 
the PM&L Theatre, 877 Main St., An- 
tioch with Steve Martin's comedy 
'Picasso at the Lapin Agile' on Feb- 
ruary 4 at 8 p.m. Remaining dates 
are Feb. 5, 11, 12, 18, and 19 at 8 
p.m. and Feb. 6, 13, and 20 at 2:30 
p.m. 



Reservations can be made by 
calling 395-3055 or by coming to the 
box office. Box office hours are Mon. 
5:30-7:30 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m. -2 p.m., 
and 1 1/2 hrs. before curtain on per- 
formance dates. Tickets are $10 for 
adults and $8 for students. 

This long running off-Broadway 




\\&J/ Presents \^_V 

f^ Steve Martin 's ^^ 

Picasso at the 
Lapin Agile 

Begins February 4 



Frl. & Sat. 8 p.m.; Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10; Students & Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 



Box Otlico Hours: Mon, Ihru Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Sal 1 1 -2 OHTN 
t 1/2 hrs. boloro showtimo. Bosorvod Scaling. VIS/VMC (Be? 



comedy places Albert Einstein and 
Pablo Picasso In a Parisian bar in 
1904 just before the renowned sci- 
entist transformed physics with his 
theory of relativity, and the celebrat- 
ed painter set the art world afire 
with cubism. In his first comedy 
written for the stage, Steve Martin, 
the popular actor and screen writer 
plays fast and loose with fact, fame 
and fortune as these two (Rob Find- 
lay from Antioch as Picasso and 
John Franco from Mundelein as 
Einstein) geniuses muse on the cen- 
tury's achievements and prospects 
as well as other fanciful topics with 
infectious dizziness. 

Bystanders including Picasso's 
agent, Sagot, (KenelmScheske from 
Salem, Wl), the bartender, Freddie, 
(Fran Jansta from Antioch) and his 
mistress, Germaine, (Mary Camp- 
bell from Ingleside), Picasso's date, 
Suzanne, (Courtney Podraza from 
Crystal lake), an elderly philoso- 
pher with weak kidneys, (Tom 
Hausman from Antioch), Charles 
DabemowSchmendimmen.anid- , 
iot inventor, (Terry O'Brien from 
Lake Villa), as well as two beauties 
(Jackie Bigalke and Reggie Reynolds 
from Antioch) introduce additional 
flourishes of humor; 

The final surprise patron to join 
the merriment at the Lapin Agile Is 
another giant of the 20th century • 
played by Darren Walsh from 
Woodstock. 



, 



i 









! 



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)0 






I 



January 28, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 



CROSSWORD 



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ACROSS 


49. Imaginary place 


I.Bet 


50. Friend 


5. Polish city 


51 . Like twine 


10. North-central Indian city 


54. Examining 


14. Sugar or, Orange 


59. Honeymoon port 


15. Good Gosh! 


62. Linear unit ' 


16. Comedown 


63. Managed 


17. Couples 


64. Talk * 


20. Signing on 


65. Russian weight unit 


21. Present 


66. Solaces. 


22. Type of nucleic acid, abbr. 


67. Formers . 


23. Lonesome. 




25. Discharge 




29. Insurance 


DOWN 


33. Riding horses 


1 . French abbot 


34. Macaws 


2. Norse goddess of fate 


35; Pin 


3.Branch 


36. Kindness 


4. Spanish city 


38. Plastic 


5. Organic compounds 


41. Compass point 


6. Capital of Guam 


42. Type genus of the Otididae 
44. Disfigures 


7. Damn 


8. Left over 


45. Breathes 


9. Flavoring 


48„Ypung swan 


10, Admirer, .-.>,;- 




JAN 



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FEB, 1-13 UNITED CENTER 



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11. Rum cut with water .. 

12. Tall N. Zealand timber tree 

13. Domed or vaulted recess 

18. Emersion 

19. Abnormal breathing 

23. Infections 

24. Elliptical 

25. Official who carries a mace of 
office 

26. Take off 

27. Nostrils 

28. South by east 

29. Women s underwear 

30. About bee 

31. Kind of literary or artistic work 

32. Discharge 

37. Open skin infection 

39. Mental hospital 

,40. Weight unit 

43. Cardinal 

46. Looked 

47: Romantic interlude 

48. Weight units 

50. George ., English actor 

I558 

51 . Canadian law enforcers 

52. Tributary of the Mississippi Riv- 
er 

53; Alto, California city 

54. Monetary units 

55. Take 

56. Hollies 

57. World's longest river 

58. Neatens 

60. Lyric poem 

61. Potable 



Answers 


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THEATRE REVIEW 

'How to Succeed' reliable 
but no show-stopper 

If nothing succeeds like suc- 
cess, the '60s comedy classic 
"How to Succeed in Business 
Without Really Trying" should be 
a winner by its name alone. 

, Even though it's 2000, and 
dot.com Internet startups and 
global mega-mergers have trans- 
formed the business landscape, 
this reliable old theatrical stan- 
dard can still muster a few laughs. 

But in the production at Drury 
Lane Oak Brook, burdened with a 
lackluster set, uninspired.costum- 
ihg and a cast that, with few ex- 
ceptions, gives a by-the-numbers 
performance, the climb to the top 
of the corporate food chain seems 
mildly amusing instead of thigh- 
slapping funny. . 

Score two points, however, for 
Rod Thomas, as Bud Frump, the 
whining, hapless nephew of the 
World Wide Widgets Co. president 
(played with zest by Joel Hatch). 
Neither actor missed a beat during Heidi Kettenring and Guy Adkfns 
opening night when, 10 minutes star in "How to Succeed in Busi- 
before intermission, an overhead ness Without Really Trying." 
spotlight exploded unexpectedly 

in a shower of glass on stage. "I didn't do it," Thomas quipped as the curtain 
made a hurried, but brief descent 

Alene Robertson, as the hard-as-nails executive secretary to head hon- 
cho Mr. Biggley, also does a fine job in a minor role. 

But Guy Adkins and Heidi Kettenring are more competent than involv- 
ing in their characterizations of the erstwhile window washer J. Pierpoint 
Finch, a young exec on a meteoric rise from mailroom to boardroom and 
Rosemary, his No. 1 fan. 

Angela Berra lays it on thick without going over the top as Hedy LaRue, 
a stereotypical blonde bimbo. 

See "How to Succeed in Business," directed by Gary Griffin, through- 
March 5. Ticket information is available at 630-530-011 1. —By Tom Witom 




HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
When it comes to an important deci- 
sion this week, Aries, don't just think 
about yourself. There are several 
others who will be affected by your 
choice. Consider what will happen to 
them, too. A loved one needs your 
help with a family matter. Do what • 
you can for him or her. 

Taurus - April 21 /May 21 
An old friend whom you haven't 
seen in a long time calls you out of 
the blue. Spend time catching up 
with this person, but don't tell him or 
her too much about yourself. He or 
she has an ulterior motive. Try to 
find out what it is. Capricorn plays 
an important role on Thursday. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
A business associate makes a mis- 
take and pins the blame on you. Be 
careful how you handle this situa- 
tion, because it could make you look 
like the bad guy. An old flame wants 
to rekindle your relationship. While 
you're flattered, say no. He or she 
wasn't right for you then, and he or 
she isn't right for you now. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 

Don't make a hasty decision when it 

comes to your career this week, 



Cancer. Is this job offer really as lu- 
crative as it claims to be? Look at 
all of the facts, and then decide. 
That special someone has a roman- 
tic evening planned for the two of 
you late in the week. Enjoy! 

Leo - July 23/August 23. 
Don't hold a grudge against a close 
friend who makes an honest mis- 
take. He or she doesn't mean to 
hurt you. Try to remember that. You 
meet someone interesting late in 
the week while out with a friend. 
Get to know this person better, be- 
cause he or she has a lot to offer 
you. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 
Don't be late for an important meet- 
ing during the middle of the week, 
Virgo. If you are, you could miss out 
on a potentially lucrative opportuni- 
ty. A family member needs your ad- 
vice about a personal problem. 
While you don't want to get in- 
volved, you have to. Just be honest 
with this person, and tell him or her 
how you really feel. > 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 
Everyone seems to want something 
from you this week. While you don't 
like to be rude, you're going to have 



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to be if you want to get anything 
done. Don't worry. Your actions won't 
offend those closest to you, and 
they're the people about whom you 
care the most. Leo plays a key role. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 
A business associate gets into trou- 
ble and asks you to tie for him or 
her. While you want to help this per- 
son, lying certainly isn't the way to 
do it. Talk to those involved, and try 
to make them understand what 
happened. Your efforts will be ap- 
preciated. Pisces plays an impor- 
tant role. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Don't back down from a challenge 
early in the week, Sagittarius. You 
know that you are more than capa- 
ble of handling this situation. Go for 
it. Those closest to you will be im- 
pressed with your effort. That spe- 
cial someone needs a shoulder to 
cry on. Be there for him or her. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Loved ones try to draw you Into the 
middle of an argument that they're 
having. Don't let them do it. Stay out 
of this mess, because it's something 
that they need to get through on their 
own. An interesting person asks you 
out this weekend. Say yes, because 
it's sure to be a good time. 

Aquarius -Jan 21 /Feb 18 
Don't get upset with a loved one 
when he or she asks for your ad- 
vice, but doesn't take it, This person 
has to do what he or she thinks is 
best. This doesn't mean that your 
opinion isn't appreciated. Don't take 
it personally. That special someone 
has an important question to ask. 
you. Be honest with him or her. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Don't lose your sense of humor this 
week, Pisces, because you're going 
to need it. There is a lot going on, 
and you're getting pulled in many 
different directions. Instead of get- 
ting upset, try. to see the humor in 
the situation. Leo plays a key role 
late in the week. 



B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



January 28, 2000 



SPECIAL EVENTS 




Seated from right to left are Cathy Rogich with sister Deb- 
by from Arlington Heights. Standing from left, are Kelli 
McGuire, Helen Leadley and Dolce Bernard from Arlington 
Heights. 

Lights, camera, 
compassion in action! 

On Saturday, Feb. 12 in the grand ballroom of Northbrook's 
Allgauer Hilton the 11th annual Hearts for Homeless Fami- 
lies benefit for Catholic Charities' North/Northwest Subur- 
ban Services Family Shelter Program will begin. Amidst daz- 
zling glitz, gaiety and autograph-seeking fans, guests of the gala will 
promptly gather at 6 p.m. to accomplish their compassionate goal to 
raise funds for homeless families with children. 

With Honored Guest Rev. Michael M. Boland, Administrator of 
Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Chicago; Honorary Chair- 
man Robert A. Clifford (Inverness), a prominent Chicago attorney; 
Emcee John Williams, WGN Radio personality; and loyal Catholic 
Charities' volunteer Gala Chairwomen Cathy Rogich, Arlington 
Heights, and Patty O'Brien, Mt. Prospect, this Hollywood hurrah 
promises to be the sensation of the new millennium. 

Founded in 1989, the annual Hearts for Homeless Families party 
to benefit the Families in Transition Program continues to be the ma- 
jor.fundraising event for The Catholic Charities' North /Northwest 
Suburban Shelters based in the Northwest Suburbs. Since its incep- ■ 
tion in 1989, over 130 families have been helped. In 1999 alone, 
12,647 nights of shelter were given to men, women and children. In- 
tensive case management for budgeting, parenting and life skills are 
weekly provided to each family. This service is just one of the Catholic 
Charities' North/Northwest Suburban Programs which help people 
in a compassionate, professional manner regardless of religious, 
racial, nationality and economic backgrounds. 

The social hour will spotlight the extravagant Parade of Prizes and 
silent auction items. A four-course dinner will be followed by a live 
auction headlined by Bill Milne from Elgin. Guests are invited to ex- 
tend the evening and listen or dance to glorious and romantic music 
from Hollywood movie and show tunes. 

Catholic Charities North /Northwest Suburban Services is located 
at 1911 Rohlwing Rd., Ste. E, Rolling Meadows, 60008. For overnight 
discount packages by request call 480-7500 and mention that you are 
a guest of the "Hurray for Hollywood" benefit. 

For more information on The Catholic Charities Northwest Sub- 
urban Services and how they may help you or someone who needs 
help, please phone 870-0560. 



ART 



All the Pretty Houses 

Highland Park artist Carol Pearl- 
man will exhibit her water color series 
on fantasy houses at the Northbrook 
Public Library now through February 12 
on the third floor. 

Pearlman's series "All the Pretty 
Houses" expresses the artist's response 
to life experiences, plain and ordinary, 
in the form of fantasy villages, row hous- 
es, and other dwellings. 

Gallery hours are Monday-through 
Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. For more infor- 
mation call (847) 432-1888. 



THEATRE 



Bowen Park Theatre, 
'Broken Glass' 

Bowen Park Theatre begins 2000 
with Arthur Miller's Broken Glass. Cen- 
tering around a Brookland housewife 
who is mysteriously paralyzed from the 
waist down and obsessed by a newspa- 
per photo of two elderly Jews forced by 
Nazi's to scrub a street with a tooth- 
brush. Set In the 1030's, Miller's spiritual 
detective story probes the troubled lives 
and marriage and sexual awakening of 
the Geliburg family. 

Performances are Friday, Feb. 4-5, 
11-12 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 6 and 13 at 2 
p.m. Broken Glass is not recommended 
for young audiences. Performances will 
be in Goodfellow Hall In the Jack Benny 
Center for the Arts, Bowen Park, 39 Jack 
Benny Dr., Waukegan. For reservations 
call the Jack Benny Center for the Arts at 
360-4741, or online at 
www.ticketweb.co m 

'Joseph' at Marriott 

Kary M. Walker, Executive Producer 
of the award-winning Marriott Theatre 
in Lincolnshire, is proud to present 
Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoat. Preview performances run 
through March 26. 

Performance Schedule is Wednes- 
days at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Thursdays at 8 
p.m.; Fridays at 8 p.m.; Saturdays at 5 
p.m. & 8:30 p.m.; and Sundays at 2:30 
p.m. and 7 p.m. Reservations with a ma- 
jor credit card can be made by calling 
the Marriott Theatre box office at 847- 
634-0200. 



SINGLES 



Christian Singles meets 
January 29 

Tills singles organization of Calvary 
Temple, 450 Keller Ave., Waukegan will 
meet at 12:30 p.m. in the Activities 
Building of the temple for a potluck 
lunch and a presentation by Penny 
Groleau on "The Wise men." 

For information call 244-1632 or 
244-4304. 

St. Peter's Singles 
Club, Catholics over 45 

All singles or widowed over 45 invit- 
ed to these dances, Friday Feb. 4, Gold- 
en Flame, 6417 Hlgguis Chicago, and 
Saturday, Feb. 5 Berwyn VFW, 16th and 



Harlem, Berwyn. 

Both dances start at 8:45 p.m., and 
the cost is $7. This Is a live band, coat 
and tie required. 

Solo Singles Group at 
Gale Street Inn 

Solo Singles Group (40+-) meets 
every Friday evening at 8 p.m. at the 
Gale Street Inn on Diamond Lake Rd. in * 
Mundclein for dancing and socializing. 
For more information please call the hot 
line at 746-6818. 

FTJ^j^SER 

Public Events at 
Marytown 

On Jan. 29, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., 
The Life of Padre Pio, the most recent 
stlgmatist In Churcli history, will be il- 
lustrated during this day of recollection. 
Director Fr. Anthony Jefinek includes 
slides and video from the recent beatifi- 
cation ceremonies. A $25 fee Includes a 
continental breakfast and lunch. 

Oh Feb. 4 and 5, a healing weekend 
retreat, 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. The Twelve 
Steps: A Journey from Broken ess to 
Healing. Director Fr. Patrick Stoffcr, 
OFM CONV,, explores the healing spiri- 
tuality of the twelve-step recovery pro- 
gram. Idea] for recovering alcoholics, 
addicts and those with codependency 
issues, the weekend retreat is $95 for a 
double occupancy, $125 for single occu- 
pancy, and $50 for commuters. 

For more information please call 
367-7800. 

Benefit for 
MargaretAnn's Place 

April 16 spend the day with (lie 
Chenille Sisters. Back by popular de- 
mand, the Chenille's will be preforming 
a two-concert series to benefit Margare- 
tAnn's Place, a center for grieving chil- 
dren, teens and families. 

Tickets for the 1 p.m. children's 
concert are $10. The adult concert is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. Tickets for this 
concert are $15. All tickets are for gener- 
al seating. The concerts will be per- 
formed at Trempcr High School, 
Kenosha, WI, 

For further information please call 
262-656-9656. 

KIDSSTTJEF : :: : 

Orphans in the Attic 
Doll-Toy-Bear show 

On Sunday, Jan.,30, from 10 a.m. -3 
p.m., Orphans in the Attic will hold their 
year 2000 Doll-Toy-Bear Show & Sale. 

Admission Is $3.50 for adults and 
$1.50 children 6-12 years old. The show 
will be held at Serb Hall, 5101 W. Okla- 
homa Ave., Milwaukee, WI. 

For more information contact 
Marge Hansen N96W20235 County Line 
Rd. Menomonee Falls, WI. 53051. Marge 
Hansen can be reached via phone at 
262-255-4465, via fax 262-255-5884 or 
via web site doUbear@execpc.com. 

Anderson Art Center 
offers classes 

The Andrerson Arts Center's Kid's 
Space, 124 66th St. Kenosha, WI., will be 
the site for a scries of art classes for chil- 



dren this winter. Classes will be held on 
Sat.,Feb,12-Aprill5. . 

, Children may sign up for any or all 
of the classes offered. Class sizes are. 
very limited. An Informational flyer, list- 
ing all classes, their descriptions, class 
fees, registration deadlines and other 
general information, is available now by 
calling the Anderson Arts Center at (262) 
653-0481. 

WORKSHOP 

Poetry Workshop 

Sign up now for a Sunday Poetry 
Workshop led by Helen Degan cohen, 
who teaches at Roosevelt University of - 
Chicago and co-edits RHINO monthly 
poetry magazine. 

Th is worksho p will cxpl o re the p o - 
et's relationship to both the real physical 
world and the one which a the poem 
creates. The workshop takes place at the 
the Suburban Fine Arts Center, 1913 
Sheridan Rd„ Highland Park, for four 
Sundays beginning Jan. 30 from 2-4p.m. 

For more information about this ' 
workshop call 432-1888. 



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Original Scripts sought 

Bowen ParkThcatre is currently 
seeking original scripts for their theatre 
for Young Audiences series. 

Scripts should be non-musical, 
original scripts targeted for young audi- 
ences (K-4) using an adult cast no larger 
than 6. Running time of script should at 
50- words- per-rninute. 

Send all material to Bowen Park 
Theatre, Jack Benny Center for the Arts, 
TVA Script Search, 39 Jack 
Benny Dr., Waukegan 60087. Please In- 
clude a self-addressed stamped enve- 
lope If you would like the material back. 

For more Information, please con- 
tact Rick Covallnskl, Performance Su- 
pervisor at 360-4741. 

Grafters wanted 

Craft ers wanted for an art & craft 
fair to be held Feb. 12- 13 at Porter 
County Expo in Valparaiso, In., and on 
March 25-26 at College of DuPage In 
Glen Ellyn, 1L For more Information, 
please contact Karen Yackley at 17957 
2900 E. St., Princeton, 61356 or call 
(815)643-2723.- ' ■ . 



HISTORY 



Genealogy Society to 
host discussion 

The Lake County Genealogy Society 
will host a round table discussion on 
Thursday, Jan. 27 at 9 30 a.m. Members 
and visitors arc invited to attend and 
bring along questions or problems one 
may have with their genealogy research. 
The Society will offer help and the neces- 
sary steps to take to either solve problems 
or advance In research. 

This open meeting will take place at 
The Reading Room, 91 Division St., 
Mundelcln. For more information, call < 
816-8074 or 526-5107. 

Continued on pageB8 



Snowshoe, cross 
country ski at 
Sportsman's 

Two exciting and invigorating 
winter activities ore available to 
Northbrook residents at Sportsman- 
's Country Club. As soon as there is a 
six-eight inch snowbase, cross coun- 
try skiing and snowshoeing will be 
available on the course, The rolling 
hills and beautiful scenery will con- 
tribute to an exceptional physical 
workout when you stop by the Club 
to ski or snowshoe. If you don't own 
the proper equipment, Sportsman's 
will rent skis for $5-$7 per day or 
snowshoes for $2-$3 per day. Addi- 
tionally, Sportsman's offers orga- 
nized cross country ski instruction 
this season for groups or individuals 
who want to feel more comfortable 
on skis. Dally winter hours are 10 
a.m.-3:00 p.m. For additional infor- 
mation on lessons or open hours, 
please call 291-2351, ext 3. 



i.il r T* r.-i :/'.[t t.^i'Uff.i.'tift.'tiitt 



Togtveus 

HOT NEWS TIPS 

call Lakeland Newapapera at 

223-8073 

You can leave your name and number 

or remain anonymous. 
Leave a meuagc & we'll check It oull 






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January 28, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ 




Illinois film offices 
team-up for this years' 
screenwriting competition 




Illinois residents are invited to 
submit their original screenplays 
during this year's edition of the Illi- 
nois/Chicago Screenwriting Com- 
petition, sponsored by the Illinois 
and the Chicago Film Offices. 

The competition is open exclu- 
sively to Illinois residents age 18 
and older. The scripts must be fea- 
ture length and set in Illinois. There 
is a $25 entry fee. Entries will be 
judged by a jury system comprised 
of local film industry representa- 
tives and current or former 
Chicagoans who have written, di- 
rected or produced feature films. 
Three winners will receive a cash 
prize and will also be honored dur- 
ing an award ceremony to be held 
in Oct 

"Chicago is becoming a 'blue 
chip' location for motion picture- ■ 
filming," said Mayor Richard M; 
Daley. "There is some excellent tal- 
ent in the area and this competition 
will create opportunities for local 



writers to get the attention of major 
film studios. 

"Illinois has made a significant 
name for itself in the movie indus- 
try. Over 25 feature films and sever- 
al drama series are shot every year 
on location in Illinois and most of- 
ten in Chicago," said Governor 
Ryan. "I wish all of the screenwrit- 
ers good luck in the contest, and I' 
look forward to making more great 
movies in Illinois." 

Winning scripts will be sent to a 
select group of producers and Hol- 
lywood studio representatives. 

The deadline to submit entries 
for the competition is April 3. A. 
writers' seminar will be offered to 
entrants on Feb. 5. 

For a complete list of rules, reg- 
ulations and an official entry form, 
call IC2000 hotline at 312-814-8711. 
Please note, only the official entry 
form will be accepted. Reproduc- 
tions or facsimiles of the official en- 
try form will not be accepted. 



Terra Museum of American Art sets 
'American Friday Nights' schedule 



Terra Museum of American Art 
has announced the schedule of its 
"American Friday Nights" series for 
the first half of the year 2000 as fol- 
lows: 

Jan. 28, Steel Express, 
Caribbean steel drum music 

Feb. 25, Ku Pono, Hawaiian 
slack key guitar 

Mar. 31, Jose Valdez Duo, Afro- 
Cuban jazz 

Apr. 28, Jimmy Tomasello Trio, 
Rhythm & Blues " 

May 26, Sean Cleland Band, 
Irish folk tunes 

June 30, Eric Lugosch, Finger- 
picking good guitar 

Guests at "American Friday " 



Nights" are able to view current ex- 
hibitions at the museum while en- 
joying live music furnished by the 
Old Town School of Folk Music in 
partnership with Terra Museum. 

Held on the final Friday of every 
month from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Ter- 
ra Museum, 664 N. Michigan Ave., 
in Chicago, the events feature live 
music, priceless art and gourmet 
refreshments. 

Admission to "American Friday 
Nights" is $5 for members and $10 
for non-members (which maybe 
applied to membership at the 
event). Cash bar. 

For further information, call 
312-664-3939. 



Will the unseasonably warm 
weather continue or will winter 
make a comeback for six more 
weeks? Find out at Brookfield Zoo 
on February 2 , as resident "meteo- 
rologist," Sunshine groundhog, 
emerges from his winter quarters 
during the annual Groundhog Day 
celebration. At 1050 a.m. in the 
Children's Zoo, keepers will at- 
tempt to coax the furry forecaster 
from his winter digs with a nutri- 
tious homemade carrot-shaped 
cake prepared especially for him by 
Brookfield Zoo's executive chef. 

According to legend, if a 
groundhog sees Its shadow on 
Feb. 2, there will be six more 
weeks of winter; if it doesn't see 
its shadow, spring is just around 
the corner. 

How did Groundhog Day be- • 
gin? One theory originated with Eu- 
ropean farmers in the eighteenth 
century. In Europe, where milder 
winters occur than in the Midwest, 
farmers would watch hedgehogs 
come out of hibernation in early 
February. Their appearance was a 
sign that It was time to begin spring 
planting. Since there are no hedge- 
hogs indigenous to the United 
States, the tradition was transferred 




Sunshine, Brookfield Zoo's resident meteorogist, peeks out from 
his winter quarters. 



to groundhogs. 

Groundhogs hibernate when 
the air temperature drops to 50 
degrees for an extended period. 
During hibernation, a ground- 
hog's body temperature drops 
form 90 degrees to 38 degrees. It 
takes a breath about once every 
minute and its heart slows to only 
four to six beats a minute. When 
spring arrives, It may take several 
hours for a hibernating ground- 



hog to rouse from itsfslumber. 
Open every day of the year, 
Brookfield Zoo's winter hours are 
10 a.m, to 5 p.m. Zoo admission is 
$7 for adults and $3.50 for children 
ages 3-11 and seniors 65 and over. 
Children 2 and under are free. 

The zoo is located at First Av- 
enue and 31st Street, Brookfield. 
For more information visit its Web 
site at www.brookfieldzoo.org or 
call 708-485-0263. 



Milwaukee hosts Woodworking Show January 28-50 



The Milwaukee Woodworking 
Show, Jan. 28-30, will feature 
demonstration and sales of ma- 
chinery, power and hand tools and 
supplies; seminars, FREE work- 
shops and more, for the woodwork- 
ing enthusiast, homebuilder/ re- 
modeler, woodturner or carver at all 
levels of expertise-beginner, ad- 



vanced or professional. Located at 
the Wisconsin State Fair Park-Trade 
Mart Building, 1-94 & 84th St, Mil- 
waukee, WI. 

For more information call 800- 
826-825/ 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., email 
information at: thewoodshows.com 
or visit the website at www.the- 
woodshows.com.. 



Winter weekends featured at 'Trees 5 



Are You Looking For Something To Do? 

See Lakelife In SECTION B very Week 



Family cross country ski week- 
ends are set for Jan. 28-30 and Feb. 
18-20 at Trees For Tomorrow, Eagle 
River, Wisconsin. A winter Elder- 
hostel Jan. 30- Feb. 5 will focus on- 
cross country ski touring and snow- 
shoeing with features on outdoor 
survival and wildlife's adaptations 



for winter. 

For more information, prices 
and availability of either of these of- 
ferings call 800-838-9472 or contact 
"Trees" bye-mail: trees@nnex.net 
The Trees For Tomorrow web adr 
dress is: 
www.treesfortomorrowcom. 




This year's show will feature 
hundreds of products, machin- 
ery demonstrations workshops 
and seminars. 



Eating and meeting in the Lakeland area 



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Join Us For Our Weekend Triple Treat 

at the GURNEE GRILL 



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FRIDAY 

All-You-Can-Eat 

SEAFOOD BUFFET 

5 - lO PM 



Snow crab* , , 

Shell-on jumbo shrimp 
Oysters . 
Marinated salmon 
Lemon buttered sole 
Mussels casino 
Cajun fried catfish . 
Clam strips 
Fried shrimp 
Crab cakes 
BBQ chicken 
Pasta bar 
Carved roast beef 
Stuffed pork loin roast 
Ham and furkey i 
Homemade breads and soup 
Fruit and salad bar 
Dessert fable and.more 



SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE 

BRUNCH BUFFET 

At the Gurnee Grill 
Jan. 28-March 11 
1 AM - 2 PM 

* Made To Order Omelets 

* Bacon • Sausage * Breakfast 
Potatoes 

* French Toast 
k Freshly Baked Muffins & Dantsl 

* Soup & Salad Bar 

* Homemade Soups 

* CAJUN & CREOLE Specialties 
k Elaborate Assortment Of Hne 

Delicate Dessert Pastries 

* Your Choice of Champagne 
or Mimosa 

** All NEW KIDS BUFFET 
k Much, Much More 












FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL 



^y^/847) 336-6300, Ext. 3| 

^jY\*v (Across from Cumce Mills) 



! 







- ■• 












NHPPEI 




eALLEcy & 

fCAHINe 

"Make/ your PenonaJ/ 
Statement wC€fr w GIFT of ART 

** Original works of art 

** Limited Edition Prints 

** Art Posters 

** Custom Framing 



Route 12 at- Route 173 
Richmond, IL 60071 

Open Tuesday-Friday 10am to 5pm 
Saturday 9am to 5pm 
Sunday 12pm to 5pm 

815-678-4682 




Be sure to look for 
our special Home 
& Garden section. 



•••••••• 



Visit the 

Lake County 

Fairgrounds on 

February 5 & 6 for 

all your Home & 

Garden needs. 



* • • 



• « • « 



Coming w Fe-Sr-aaref. 

Forefronts 

'lake County 

Progress 2000" 



B.6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



(01 



HOT SPOTS 



\.'i i 



. ... 



January 28, 2000 '^ 



January 28, 2000 



HOT SPOTS 



«.*. 



^0° 




UYONE 



ooo 










eo 



LUNCH OR DINNER OR 
SATURDAY & SUNDAY BREAKFAST] 

WtTH PURCHASE OF A SOFT DRINK 

Purchase one an(J get ihe second of equal or lesser value FREE! 
Maximum $4.00 Breakfast & Lunch - $6,00 Dinner 



LAST CHAM 
mOONCBEF 

129 Center Street, Grayslake 

223-0082 I 

Mi/ gfmil with any titlm ampoit, dhriwitt or uffrr. A tt ixim urn SG.OO • Gaotl thru 3-3-Of), 




I 



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B|[ErgraMgjBIBMgJ@ir21gjaaiBMr2MB^^ 



The Best Chinese Food 

In Tlte Area.:. 

And Our Customers 

Are The Critics 




Ul'lf 



FREE Delivery call for details Plenty of Free Parking 

• Dine In • Carry Out • Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Everybody's Talking About 

Conveniently Located Across From Fairgrounds 
111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882. Fax: (847) 548-2822 



i 

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American Pub & Eatery 
Lunches Dinners Banquets 
• Steaks • Pastas • Seafood • Chicken 

fforlas Csreaiesi Jim jfru C)oeru Jrtaay 



e wwaaa . ; nww w »w »" f 



wan w* Jor J/oomali (Jundau* 

6 Different NFL Games 

Broadcasting Simuitaneously\ 

Football Specials! 





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: ■ ■ , : 

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&#WiQCH 1200 Mala St. 
Ph; 838-449 ! • Fax 838-4489 



Hours*. 

Suri,-Thurs r 10-40-9300 

Trl/ft Sot, 10T30- 10*30 



LiNsdeNH!U8?ST 21 22 Grand Ave. 
Ph. 265- 1 41 1 -Fax 256-5226 



' . Hours: 
Mon. -Thurs. 1tk30-B3O 
rVJ. & Sot; 1CK30- 10300 
Sun, 11:00-030 



r-TY 



Lindenhurst 



^ 



so 



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/he wrtote famltyl 
Just East of Rt. 12 
Wauconda 




Live bands^. «'■ !*&«££ \ " ^ wWJlrt 
[ 5rtSVjg<B473 r526-0Q02^ u : sda ^ 






- 



•fSTT ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL 
Beef or Chicken Tacos 9 9$ Each 



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WITH BVM&RGJ&Rrm 




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WITH COUPON. MON.-THURS. ONLY OFFER EXPIRES 5-1 6-«0 




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TT" SAVE 

— $40 per couple! 

— — .'. Musi book by 

WT — "*. January 30, 2000! 

via IW United 



LLLAmil 






CANCUN 



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5nl» Air/rlold/Trintfert From: 

•789" '894 91 



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Aslon Coral fleet Hotel © 

• Includes: 5ih nirjhl FREE, 2 lor 1 luau 
arwJ-ASTONishinrj Deals' coupon Uooki 

Aston Pacific Monarch Q 

• InclutJos: 5lh nirjht FREE, 2 lor 1 luau 
and 'ASTONishing Deal's - coupon book! 100091 

Sheraton Princess Kalulani Hotel© 007 

• Includes: 5th nirjhl FREE! ,..,.„ ,-,, 
Sheraton Walkikl Hotel O '1059" '1144 

• lncludas : Slh nifjht FREE 

Hawaii System Saver rates are valid lor Wod-Thu departures 2/23-3/31/00 In 

■Wclass ol service. Oahu vacations includes air, hotel, round trip, airport/hotel 

l/ansfers, fresh flower lei, greeting and welcome orientation breakfast. 



<954« 
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Pest Peal 



Round Trip Air Only 



- -.a ■ "M ■ ' 
*249 9i <249" 
«529" *599" 

T System Saver prices valid to 3nl Wed ond 4nt Sat flepto 2/2-2/26/00,; ■ 

Continental Villas *499' s '699" 

Plaza Cancun Q 

iberostar Quetzal <53> *719' S M239" 

• Includes oil moals, bovoragos & more! 

System Sa'vw prices valid lor 3nl Wed depts 2/2-2/23, 7nl Wed dept 2/2 4 7nt 
Sat allonwon depls 2/5, 2/19 4 2/26/00. Add S20 to 7nl Sat morning dept VS. 



JAMAICA 



Shaw Park Beach Hotel © '879" *919" 

Wyndham Rose Hall & M0I9" M059" 

Country Club O 



AIMnclusIves 



Include* id meirt, bevengci i mortt 

PolntVlllage© M019» M059" 

Sandals Royal Jamaican© *179?'*' M839" 



System Savers valid lor 7nl Wad & Sal depls 2/2-2/2(3/00. 




Clarion Resort South Ocean© 

Nassau Marriott Resort 
& Crystal Palace O • 
Radlsson Cable Beach Resort© 



4a zm 

s 53 9« * 7 29« 

'679" 1 959" 



699" M079" 



System Savers valid lor 4nl Sun depts 1/30, 2/13-2/27 & 7nl Tbu depts 2/10 
4 2/24/00. Add S40 lor 7nl Sun depts 1 /30-2/1 3 4 2/27/00. 



EXPERIENCE THE THRILL OF RACING THIS SPRING! 



Tlckets.available for Racing at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. 



NASCAR Busch NASCAR 

Grand Nationals Winston Cup 

Saturday, March 4th Sunday, March 5lh 

.'SO 00 Reserved Seats 'while" .*80 



Reserved Seats.... 
General Admission. 



,00 



NHRA 
Drag Racing 

Saturday, April 8th 
Reserved Seals 'SO 00 

Sunday, April 9th . 



,*35 00 Reserved Seats "red'.'CS 00 Reserved Seats *60 00 



ES>Y and Race tickets 

will not be sold 
separately and may 
onW be pu/thased 
with Lis Vegas Fun|el 
Vacation! hole) only 
or La« Vegas alrmolel 
vacation. Ticket* «tt 
oon-relundablo upon 
cancellallon. Tickets 
for racing events are 
■Iso available wlih Las 
Vegas Funjol Vacation 
air only vacations. 



r 



Trans- 



Travel 

•00 




v !■: ARS 



Funjet 

VdcoSions' 



Of Making Memories 




Ascot Travel, Lt 

847-244-0110 




Lakeland Newspapers / B7 



COM 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Grande Jake's 



£iwS*r>i 



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xm%^- 



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Location: 

1 200 Main St., Antioch 

Linden Plaza, Lindenhurst. 

Telephone: 

(847)838-4491 

(847)265-1411 

Hours: 

Antioch-Mon-Thurs., 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fri. and Sat., 10:30 a.m. 

to 10 p.m.; Sun., 1 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. Lindenhurst:-Mon.-Thurs., 

10:30 a.m. to 0:30 p.m:; Fri.iand^nt.-,.10:30fa.m -10 p.m.;- 

Sun., 1 1 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 

Facilities: 

Lunch and dinner menu, many fine Mexican entrees served with 

beans and rice. Full bar featuring Margaritas, Pina Coladas; Sangrias 

and a wide selection of Mexican beers. Dine in or take out. 



Grande Jake's twice as good 

Grande Jake's, located in the Linden Plaza in Lindenhurst is not 
the only great Mexican restaurant in the area. There is now a Grande 
lake's at 1200 Main St. in Antioch. 

These two fine dine- in, carry- out Mexican Restaurants have a 
new concept in service. You order your food at the counter and then 
sit down and relax with a free salsa appetizer, and a tangy Margarita, 
a Sangria, or a sweet Pina Colada until one of Jake's friendly runners 
delivers some of the best authentic Mexican food you've ever had to 
your table. Jake's also offers a wide selection of Mexican beers. 

lake's well trained staff is one big happy family waiting to bring 
you an enjoyable South of the Border dinning experience 

A popular lunch entree is the Enchilada Suiza, two delicious 
enchiladas served with beans and rice, and for dinner the Burrito 
Sulsa can't be beat. 

A visit to Grande Jake's will bring warm and festive Mexico to 
Lake County during the winter snows or when 'the summer sun is 
shinning. Enjoy succulent Mexican entrees in the casual Latin atmos- 
phere at lake's, or in in the comfort of your own office or home. 

Jake's in Antioch is open Mon. through Thurs. from 10:30 a.m. to 
9 p.m.; Fri. and Sat. from from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sun. from 
11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

lake's in Lindenhurst is open Mon. through Thurs. from 10:30 a.m. 
to 8:30 p.m.; Fri. and Sat. from 10 :30 a.m.* to 10 p.m. and Sun. from 
1 1 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 

Call (847)838-4491 or {847)265-141 1 for more information. 




; List ^dur^lv^ 

mbnthly^ravvin§ totwirva s 40 -gift cettiJ 

Name: 

City/StateyZfpi 
Phone: v ; ^ 
Favorite ^st^ifllnfi 

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MEXICAN 



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DINE IN OR CARRY OUT IK , TI4P Krt HAimwAllF D , ATA 
CATERING AVAILABLE . m J c H / D ^l" A ?^rI , ^ 
OPEN 7 PAY$ 10AM - 1QPM 651 RTL W-RQUNDLAKE 







;. 













Super Bowl Party! 

Sunday, Jan. 30th * Starting at 2pm 
Free RafOes • Giveaways • Food * Prizes 




4 POOL TABLES, DART BOARD, GOLF & BOWLING,' 
8 LARGE SCREEN TVs FOR YOU TO WATCH 






POOL ^2Z#! GAMES; 

2 Full Service Bare Upper & Lower, Level • 
TBA URGE Dance Floor A Stage Area, Plenty o( Parking I "" 

Parties???? i 



225 E; Main Street 
Round Lake Park, -IL 



Hours - Mon. -Closed. 

Tues.-Thors. 3 pm - 12 am 

Fri. & Sal 3prn- 3 am. Sun. 11am- 1am 



RaraRsnTi 



Party Room 

Available. 
Call for Details. \ 




37318 N. Stanton Point Rd. 

Ingleslde, IL . 



Proudly Announces 

Top Jock of 

95-WHLROCk 

Steve Perks 

has Joined the Jukebox Staff . 

Rated "Top Dance Spot in Lake 
County" 3 out of 5 years} 

Rock With Us Soon! 
'50s/60s,70s/S 

Reservations (847) 587-8088 



a aa a 






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iseover Great <$oodJlt 



Restaurant & Deli 



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SUNDAY STEAK FRY 

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] [S r e^er^t|ons^call: , " ; ; 
: Holiday inn, Gurnee^ 
^33^300 

Ext/ 600 

Tax & gratuity not Included. 
Limited space available. 



JOIM \KJfS 



GAME ROOM 



ill 




V?3 



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M ' k\ Join Us At The 



NUMBER 1 VOLLEYBALL FACILITY IN LAKE COUNTY WITH 3 LIGHTED COURTS 



/UMDAV NFL & BLACKHAWK 
DIRECT TV TICKET 



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WED. & FRI* 






■ miDAY-' OPEN FOR BREAKFAST 9 am Saturday & Sunday 

Fish Fry Lunch Specials M-F 

SATURDAY Kitchen open Fri. & Sat. 'til midnight t 

Food & Drinlt primeR ' b 18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd., Gages Lak e « (847) 223^-2575 



_^^__ 



— \ 



January 28, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 




Lakeland Newspapers! B8 



Contin uedfrom page B4 

SPECIALEVENTS..; 

Have breakfast 
with the belugas 

Imagine being a beluga whale and 
■watch the underwater world come to 
life each day! Mark your calendars for 
Feb. 19 and 26, when you and your fam- 
ily are invited to Shedd Aquarium for 
the "Breakfast with the Animals" pro- 
gram. There's no better way .to start 
your children's winter weekends than to 
marvel at the incredible buluga whales 
residing at Shedd. 

Tickets are $25 for children ages 3- 
1 1 and seniors; $28 for adults. Children 
,;igcs 2 and under free. Reservations are 
required, so please call in advance at 
(312)692-3333 for more information 

CLASSES 
.___ 

classes offered 

This class will introduce the stu- 
dent to this easy to learn discipline, T'ai 
Chi Chlh consists of 19 flowing move- 
ments and one pose, which will en- 
hance the flow of energy in the body. 
Sally McLaughlin, an accredited T'ai Chi 
Chin instructor, will teach tills soft, con- 
tinuous movement that requires little 
effort on Wednesdays beginning Feb. 2 - 
March 22 from 1:30-2:45 p.m. in the 
Jack Benny Center for the Arts Dance 
Studio located in Bowen Park. Tills is 
not a form of martial arts, but a moving 
meditative form. No physical contact is 



made In the practice of T'ai Chi Chlh. 
The fee for residents is $62 and $67 for 
non-residents. Registration Is accepted 
at Jack Benny Center for the Arts located 
In Bowen Park, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan or by calling 360-4740. 

Park Dist. hosts game 
fishing seminar 

Spring really Isn't far away when 
you think 'Fishing.' Take a Northbrook 
Park District seminar on Game Fishing 
Techniques, offered on Tuesday, Feb. 8, 
at the Leisure Center. Participants, ages 
12+, will discover new lures and old fish- 
ing tricks, offered by a fishing pro. The 
seminar begins at 7 p.m. at 3323 Walters 
Ave. There Is no fee for youngsters un- 
der 1 fl years of age, with adult residents 
paying only $3 to attend. An additional 
advanced techniques class will be held 
on Tuesday, Feb. 15. To register for ei- 
tlier of these fishing classes, please call 
291-2980. 



MUSIC 



Lake Forest Symphony 
presents Cabaret Benefit 

The Lake Forest Symphony Asso- 
ciation will present Us Third Annual 
Cabaret Dinner Evening featuring vo- 
calists Miss America 1998 Kate Shin- 
die and Don Bollnger performing mu- 
sic of Broadway and Hollywood. The 
program will also feature the Sympho- 
ny's own Maestro David Itkin at the 
piano. This evening of fine dining and 
entertainment, sponsored by First 
Midwest Bank, will be held at the Deer 
Path Inn, 255 E. Illinois Rd.,Lake For- 
est. A cash bar will open at 6 p.m. with 
dinner at 7:15 p.m. The cost of the 
evening Is $65 per person. For addi- 
tional information please call or visit 
the Symphony office at: Deerpath 
Plaza, 255 E. Deerpath, suite 138, Lake 
Forest, 295-2135. 



Performance opportunities for youths 



Kids Play is in its second suc- 
cessful year and will conduct its 
spring session from Feb 5 -April 8. 
Students eight to fourteen-years- 
old will learn acting techniques, 
theatre performance skills and have 
the opportunity to participate in a 
theatre production. Some of the 
students have gone on to commu- 
nity and professional theatre. Audi- 
tions for Kids Play will take place on 
Sunday, Feb. 6, from 2-5 p.m. at 
Bowen Park's Goodfellow Hall, 39 



Papai Players presents 
'Jack and the Beanstalk' 



A lovable nine-foot giant and a 
talented cast presents this one-hour 
humorous musical adventure by 
the Papai Players. Located at Cut- 
ting Hall, 150 Wood St., Palatine, to 
reserve tickets in advance call 359- 
9556. 

The cast consists of Jason Groh 
(Jack) of Lombard, Allison Hage 
(Jack's mother) of Crystal Lake, 
Randall Filippi (Evil Baron) of 
Streamwood, Kevin Peters (Bag of 
Gold) of Woodstock, Marsella 
Schade (Goosie) ofLemont, Vicki 



Verhoven (Magic Harp) of 
Naperville, Jeff Anderson (Giant) of 
Arlington Heights and Pat Cotsakis 
(Pianist) of Palatine., 

Scheduled performances are 
Jan. 29 at 10:30 a.m., Feb. 9 at 10 
a.m., Feb. 18 at 10 a.m., and Feb. 21 
at 10:30 a.m. 

Ticket price is $6 (prepaid), $7 
at the door. The theater opens on- 
half hour prior to show time for 
seating. 



Jack Benny Dr., Waukegan. Audi- 
tions are for placement and selec- 
tion of roles. All registered partici- 
pants will be offered parts in this ex- 
citing youth theatre class. Rehearsal 
dates are determined based on ac- 
tor availability and script require- 
ments. Rehearsals are usually held 
three days a week from 7-8:30 p.m. 
in Bowen Park. The cost for Kids 
Play is $60 for residents and $65 for 
non-residents. 

Children's Chorus of 
Waukegan is also in its second 
year of providing singing opportu- 
nities to eight to twelve year olds. 
Any area youth interested in join- 
ing this wonderful group of 
singers is welcome. Classes are 
conducted in the Choral Room at 
Waukegan High School, 2325 
Brookside, Waukegan Mondays, 
Feb. 7-ApriI 10 from 6-7:30 p.m. 
Students are under the direction 
of Jennifer Wagner, Waukegan 
' High School Chorus Director. The 
Children's Chorus will be giving a 
free concert on April 10, 7:30 p.m. 
at the Brett Theatre at Waukegan 
High, the cost is $30 per student. 
Registration is accepted at Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts located 
in Bowen Park at 39 Jack Benny 
Dr., Waukegan or by calling 360- 
4740. 



DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 




1 1 



A Moving Musical Event I'-newy 

From ihc Creator of JEKYLL & HYDE an <J THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL 
COUNTRY MUSIC STAR 



Larry Gatlin 

/ TXT i^few 



ORKONE 




THE BROADWATMtJfgrCAL 



■ 



"It's a Phenomenon!" 

-New Ybrk'nmis 




TWO WEEKS ONLY! 
March 28 - April 9 



CALL (312) 902.1500 NOW! 

(Jumps ol M) Ur more: {Ml} IJrSSrfMUII 

'I'ii Lei* .ilsit .n.ill.ilili' ,tl I he litiv nMifi- in .ill t<t*efyjimtM uulli'lsi • ■ 

tr^t-Miii l*irl<<. Srim, tJiiminfi l.'S, Nmri U<-« iirtl> .uitl lltn H\ . . 

(>itlrr_tl< l.t-ts oii'Miiri iitiu.tf< l.ftin.iMi-r.iom - .*' 



"Jack" is portrayed by Jason 
Walker of Palatine and "The 
Lovable Giant" is played by Jeff 
Anderson of Arlington Heights 






1)1 It. Itinilnl|ili 



Cultural community hosts 
arts festival, Feb. 5-7 

Around The Coyote will celebrate the new century and millen- 
nium with a Winter Festival. Unlike the fall festival that 
spans throughout the whole Bucktown/ Wicker Park neigh- 
borhood of Chicago. The Winter Festival will focus on two 
historic buildings: The Northwest Tower, a.k.a. The Coyote Tower, and 
The Flat Iron Arts Building. 

The Winter Festival is open to all artists, media and themes, how- 
ever the emphasis will be placed on the direc- 
tion of contemporary art at the dawn of the 
third millennium. Acceptable media include, 
but are not limited to, installation, painting, 
sculpture, video, performance, theater, dance, 
mixed media and photography. 

Work will be exhibited in raw spaces pro- 
vided by the Northwest Tower and the Flat 
Iron Arts Building. Sculptures and installations will be placed in foy- 
ers, lobbies, hallways and vacant rooms. In the Flat Iron Arts Building, 
two-dimensional work will be displayed in hallways, while three-di- 
mensional work will be exhibited in studios and open spaces. Perfor- 
mances will be held at local restaurants and bars. 

The festival runs, Feb. 5, 5-11 p.m., Feb. 6, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Feb. 
7, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

For additional information, please call 773-342-6777. 




Forget! 



For the best selection and prices on ne^ 
and pre-driven vehicles, look in the 






ilrManiL 



gf 9l^»1 *%.^"* M^,^ four complete 



ttf tuymj fluhfeJ 



weekly section in your 
Lakeland Newspaper 




Suburban 

Family 



Delivered to Your 
Home Monthly 
By Direct Mail 




www.suburbanfamily.com 



The people at Suburban Family are 

offering a special delivery price of $9.95 

for a one year subscription to the 

most rapidly growing magazine in 

Lake/McHenry County. 

For a short time get Suburban Family 

delivered to you directly for only $9.95. 

That's 83$ an issue. 



^gjL 


HbF 


Vd'iJiHMI 


mF - * 


mm 


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mm 




'' '^vy*jsy? 




|'-**53f ■ -i^ ■ 






'sFamilie 




Make Checks Payable To: 

Suburban 

Family 

P.O. Box 188 
Grayslake, IL 60030-0118 



Name 



Address 
City 



.St., 



zip 



Phone 



January 28, 2000 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 




Lakeland Newspapers I B9 




i 



The Hurricane, the newest 
venture from film maker 
Norman Jewison, tells the 
true story of the former 
number one boxing contender Ru- 
bin "Hurricane'' Carter, played by 
Denzel Washington arid his . 
decade-long struggle to clear his 
name. But it is the way tills film 
tells the story that makes It rise 
above a regular biographical film. 

Carter was falsely accused of the 
murder of three white people at a 
bar that he was never in. Carter was 
convicted of the crime twice, and 

-nnim """ 1 *l i»5£y aft?*"?™— "««xi 

|CLAS8IC®CINEMASl 

limiiiiiii iBlil mwimi iimiiii > i ill il 



FOX LAKE Sf3 

115 Lakeland Plaia . JM „ ■_•_' 
8 47-973 -2800 gijSS 

fTnit-wnWr | n o|| auditorium. + DIGITAL. 



SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, JAM. 26 
THRU THURSDAY, FEB. 3 

GREEN MILE [R] 

■paw? 

Daily 4:30 8;00 
Sat/Sun/Wed 1:00 4:30 8:00 

DEUCE BIGELOWw 

I If l|omr| 

Frl 5:00 8:15 10:15 

Sat 1130 2:45 5:00 8:15 10:15 

Sun/Wed 12:30 2:45 5:00 8; 1 5 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5:00 8:15 

BICENTENNIAL MAN [Pen, 

Dally 4:45 
Sat/Sun/Wed 1:30 4:45 

SUPERNOVA [Pen 

Fri/Sat 7:45 10:00 
Sun-Thur 7;4S 

GALAXY QUEST iPci 

Fri 5:15 7:30 9:45 

Sat 12:45 3:00 5:15 7 JO 9:45 

Sun/Wed 12:45 3:00 5:15 7:30 

MonrTue/Thur 5:15 7:30 

STUART LinLE p4j 

Frl 5:10 7:15 9:15 

Sat 1:15 3:15 5:10 7:15 9:15 

Sun/Wed 1:15 3:15 5:10 7:15 

Mon/Tue/Thur 5; 10 7:15 



FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN & SOFT DRINKS 

No diiMrtn undtf 4 odmifltd to R-rai»d rnovits after 4 PM 



www.classlccinemas.com 

WHERE MOVIE GOING IS.FUN AND AFF0R0ABIE 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



IROUTE 43 near ROUTE 1 20 
(847) 444-FILM »»> 



■ARGAIH MAT1MIU IVIRY DAY 

AIL SHOWS IIFOII 6 PM 



SHOWTIMES FOR 1/28 THRU 2/3 



BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
'INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



GREEN MILE (rj 

FRI 5:15, 9.00 SAT& SUN 130, 5:15. 9:00 
MON-THURS 355. 7:30 



SUPERNOVA (P0.13) 

FRI 4:45 7:00 9:15 SAT4 SUN 230 4:45 7:00 9:15 
HON-THURS 4:45 7«3 



HURRICANE (RlDigilaJ 

FRI 520, 830 SAH SUN 2:15, 520, 630 
MON-THURS 4:00. 7:10 



NEXT FRIDAY (rjd^w 

FRI 4:10 5:10 635 735 9:001000 

SAT & SUN 1:45 2:45 4:1 5:10 635 735 £00 tftOO 

MON-TKURS4:105:10635735 



BICENTENNIAL MAN <pq) 

FRI 4:45 SAT & SUN 200 4:45 MON-THURS 430 



DEUCE BIGALOW m 

mi-SUN 7:30 9:40 MON-THURS 7.15 



TALENTED MR. RIPLEY m 

FRI 5:00 B.OO SAT & SUN 2:00 5:00 B:00 
MON-THURS 4:30 730 



ANY GIVEN SUNDAY iri 

FRI 520 6:40 SAT A SUN 2:00 520 8:40 
MON-THURS 4:30 7:40 



STUART LITTLE fpoi 

FRI 4:50 7:00 9:10 SAT & SUN 2:40 4:50 7:00 9:10 
MON-THURS 4:50 7:00 



GIRL, INTERRUPTED (R) Digital 

FRI 4:50 7:4 5 1ft 30 SAT 4 SUN 2:00 450 7:45 1 030 
MON-THURS 450 7:45 ' 



DOWN TO YOU (po.13) 

FRI 5:45 730 955 SAT & SUN 1 30 335 5:45 730 
935 MON-THURS 5:45 730 



GALAXY QUEST ( pgj 

FRI 450 720 9:45 SAT 4 SUN 235 450 720 9:45 
MON-THURS 4:50 720 



GIFT CERTIFICATES GN SALE 




? 



movie review 




with 




The Hurricane 

Rating 

R 
Director 

Norman Jewison 
Starring 

Denzel Washington 
Deborah Unger 

TJevSchreiber 
Vicellous Shannon 

John Hannah 



was forced to spend many years of 
his life behind bars. 

The movie documents the strug- 
gles of an innocent man who is try- 
ing to survive the dehumanizing ex- 
istence that is prison life. Carter 
disconnects himself from the out- 
side world, and from the world that 
surrounds him. That is until a 
Brooklyn boy and three Canadian 
activists fall into Carter's struggle. 

It is in the story of Lesra, the 
young Brooklyn boy played by Vi- 
cellous Shannon, that this story 
succeeds. 

Lesra is taken under the wing of 



EGAL 



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SI.kIiuhi i. f .1 t i llf, 
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(1:20 3.40) 8.05 B. IS do 
2.00 4:15) 7.05 920 ac 
(130 3:45) 8.00 430 DO 
(1:15 3 55] 8.30 9: 10 qc 



EYE OF THE BEHOLDER (H) (1:00 4.00) 7:15950 OB 

ISMT SHE GREAT (H) 

SIMPATICO(R) 

GRIZZLY FALLS (PC) 

NEXT FBI DAY {H) 

PLAY IT TO THE BONE (P.) 

DOWN TO YOU(PO-13) (t:25 320 5 20) 725 9.45 oc 

CRADLE WILL ROCK(fl) (I 10 4 00) 6 SO 930oc 

THE HURRICANE (R) (1:254 20) 720 oc 

SUPERNOVA (PC-1J) (1.00 3 00 5 00)7 CO 9.35 oc 

GIRL. INTERRUPTED (R) (1.03 3.40) 8.30 9 CO no 

THE TALENTED UR. RIPLEY(R) (1 05 3 55, 835 J.I 5 oc 

ANY GIVEN SUNDAY (R) (I 50 5 251 8 55 OC 

STUART LITTLE (PG) (1 JS 3.30 5 30) 7 30 9.40 db 

■1CENTCNMAL MAN (POJ (1^0 4:20)6 55 9 35 DO 

THE GREEN MtLE(R) (1:40 5. OS) 8.30 OD 

OEUCE BIGALOW: MALE GIGOLO (R) 9 50 no 

TOYSTORYJ(G) (1.05 110 SIS) 720 oc 

THE SIXTH SENSE (PG-131 II 45 4101 620 840 OB 



LAKE ZURICH 12 

75S S Rjnd Rd. M7-5 JO-OOCO 



three Canadians who befriend the 
boy on a trip to New York. After 
getting the consent of Lesra's par- 
ents, they take him home with them 
to home school him, helping the 
teen to realize his goal of going to 
college. 

The Canadians teach Lesra to 
read, and the first book he gets is 
"The.Sixteerith Round," Carter's 
memoir that he wrote in prison. 

The book moves Lesra to write 
to Carter, and soon a relationship is 
formed. 

The movie succeeds in showing 
the parallel struggles of these two 
characters. As Carter found he 
needed to disconnect himself form 
everything he loved to survive in 
prison, Lesra has disconnected 
himself from his family and the 
world he knew to move ahead. 
Both struggle to deal with the pains 
caused by their decisions. 

Their common struggle created 
a father-son bond between them, 
and is captured in brilliant perfor- 
mances by both Washington and 
Shannon. 

Their bond moves Lesra's Cana- 
dian mentors, who move to New 
Jersey to help to free Carter. 

The decisions that director Jewi- 




• Friday 1/28 through Thursday 2/3 

isioo 



UNIOtS [(0 1 ovu>, 
CHIlDHNill J.UN0ID& 
ML SHOWS NfOtt&M. 

S4.00ADUIT ADMISSION AfTUSPM I 



B l l lBBgl iM] 



GREAT IR) (1 2: 15 2.30 4 SO) 7.05 9 20 
SJMPATICO(R) (11:352;OS430)700935im| 

EYE OF THE BEHOLOER(R) (t 1:40 2:10 4 40] 7. 10 940 ool 
DOWN TO YOUIPQ-13) (12.10225 4 40)8559.10 ool 
THE HURRICANE (R) (11 50 300)8:10 9 20ml 

GIRL INTERRUPTED (R) (1 .00 3 SO) 6.40 930 fw I 
SUPERNOVA(PG-13) 9t5n»l 

THE CIO EH HOUSE RULES|PG-UJ (12*5 J K} B2SM9BM 
THE TALENTED UR, RIPLEY(R) (12 IS 110) S 10 9: 10 ml 
ANY QVEN SUNDAY (R) (11 JO 2:40) 8.05 9 20ml 
STUAHT LITTLE (PG) (11:452«J 4:15)8:30 8:45ool 
THE GREEN MtLE(R) (12 00 4 00) 7.45 ml 

TOYSTORY2(C) (11:552:154 35)7 00m| 



♦ Ho Pjutl • No Pjt»*i Of Sup*' SJVffi 

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IMSMBBJa^^aBSSttMaui 



? Antioch (847) 395-0216 
378 Lake St., Antioch 



STUART LITTLE (PG) 

Fri. 6:30, 8:30 Sal. 2 JO, 4 JO, 

6:30, 8:30 Sun. 2 JO, 4:30, 7:00 

Mon.-Thurs. 7.-00 



Liberty <8-17) 362-3011 

70Q N. Mil w.iiitcoo Ave, 

LibcTlyville 



CRADLE WILL ROCK W 

Dally 8:30 

TOY STORY 2(G) 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 6:30 
Sal. & Sun. 2:00, 4:15, 6 JO 

MAGNOLIA (R) 

Fri., Mon.-Thurj. 7:30 
Sat. & Sum 12:30, 4:00, 7:30 



■ ■*v3t(Ss<to 



The College of Lake County Presents 

Dreams of 

Martha 
Stewart 








Tickets: 

$8 general public 

$6CLC 

students/staff/alumni 

For tickets call (fie PAB ticket office 
at (847)' 543-2300, Room PI 12, ' 
10 o.m.* 4 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. Visa, Mastercard, Discover 
and American Express accepted. 



Sunday 
February 6 

2 p*ni* . 
Mainstage Theatre 

This one-woman show is 
a seriously funny play lhar, 
using Martha Stewart as 
a metaphor, explores the 
eternal, quest for the 
perfection we all seek, but 
can never really have. 
Note: The subject matter 
of this play is intended for 
mature audiences. 
Parental discretion is 
advised. 



College of Lake County ■ 19351 W. Washington Street • Grayslake, IL 



Denzel Washington and director Norman Jewison on the set of 
UniversalPlcture's "The Hurricane." 



son made in this film also make it 
work, proving that it Is not always 
what is put into a movie, but what is 
left out Throughout the film, a 
conspiracy to convict Carter of the 
crime is slightly hinted at The offi- 
cer that had him arrested was the 
same man who arrested him as a 
young boy. And references are 
made to the "important people" 
that stand to lose if Carter's convic- 
tion is overturned. 



However, the audience never 
learns anytliing more about the 
conspirators or their motives. We, 
like Carter and his supporters, are 
left in the dark. This move lets the 
audience connect with the charac- 
ters, as we are all in the same boat 

TheHunicaneis a great story cap- 
tured in a visually-rich, honest movie 
. The storyline is backed up by all- 
around great performances. I give it 
three and a half popcorn boxes. 



Genealogical Society to meet 



The DuPage County Genealogical 
Society will host its 25th annual con- 
ference on Saturday, Feb. 26. With a 
focus on helping genealogists move 
"Forward Into the Past," the all-day 
conference will feature 12 sessions in 
three tracks. These sessions will fo- 
cus on resource utilization, skill im- 
provement and use of technology in 
genealogy. One track of programs 
will focus on the New England re- 
gion. 

This silver anniversary program 
is designed for both beginning and 
experienced family searchers. The 
New England track will feature 
David Dearborn, librarian at the 
New England Historic Genealogical 
Society, He will lead programs on 
New England regional town 
records, manuscript collections, 
migration and New York City re- 
search. Many early Illinois families 
came from the New England area, 
so this track promises to be helpful 
for many DuPage County and Illi- 
nois researchers. 

Michael John Neill, a well-known 
speaker and authority on genealogi- 



ShovvFlaceS 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S of(ED 
!7 847/247*8958 & 



ALL SEATS S 2P° FRI & SAT 

- s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtime* For fri,, 1/28 Thru Diurs.,2/3 
*Sat.-Sun. Matinees in [Brackets] 

THE BONE COLLECTOR (R) 

[1:00 4:00] 7:10 9:50 

THE MESSENGER (R) 

[12:30 3:3016:50 10:00 

DOUBLE JEOPARDY (R) 

[.1:40 4:30] 7:30 .10:20 - 

BRINGING OUT THE DEAD (R) 

[1:10 4:15] 7:50 10:25 
RANDOM HEARTS (R) 

[12:40 3:50] 7:00 10:05 

THREE KINGS m 

[12:45 4:10] 7:20 10:10 
RUNAWAY BRIDE ( pg) 
[12:50 3:45] 6:45 9:30 

POKEMON (G) 

[1:20 3:40] 6:40 

CRAZY IN ALABAMA (R) 

9:20 



cal methods, will discuss court 
records, problem solving, analysis 
o f fi n d i n gs and pi an n i ng n ext steps, 
Mr. Neill is ah instructor at Carl 
Sandburg College in Galesburg IL 
and is on the staff of the Genealogi- 
cal Institute of Mid-America. This 
track will provide help in identifying 

new sources and maximizing the . 

information currently available, re- 
gardless of your ancestral roots. 

In other sessions, Naperville resi- 
dent Jeff Bockm an will speak on 
use of computers in conducting re- 

* search; Westmontresident, Patricia 
Kruger, will discuss planning and 
research in the world's largest ge- 
nealogical library and Maureen 
Brady will present a discussion on 
the FamilySearch web site. 

The conference will be at the 
Hilton Hotel-Lisle/Naperville. Reg- 
istration and vendor availability be- 
gins at 8 am. Program sessions will 
last until 4 p.m. Early registration 
ends Feb. 11. Information on the 
program and registration details 
can be found at the society website* 
www.dcgs.org or by contacting 
Nancy Houston at 90 Midhurs t 
Court, No.lOlA, Naperville; (630) 
548-9095. 



| vlilt our wbthB at wwfwJarnottxom | 




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EYE OF THE BEHOLDER (R| 1225. 24S. 505. 730.550 
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ANGELA'S ASHES ((*] • 
PLAT IT TO THE BONE (R) 
DOWN TO YOU (PCI 3) 
HURRICANE (RJ 
SUPERNOVA |PG13) 
GIRL INTERRUPTED (PG13) 
NEXT f filDAT (I) 
MAGNOLIA (Rj 
CIDER HOUSE RULES (PG13) 
TAUNTED MR. RIPLEY (I) 



GALAXY QUEST (PG] 

STUART UHU (PG) 

GREEN Mill (R) 

TOY STORY 2 (G) 

AMERICAN BEAUTY (1) 

SNOW FALLING ON CEDARS (PG13) 

ANY GIVEN SUNDAY (R) 

BICENTENNIAL MAN (PG) 



1250. 300. 510. 725. 935 

1200.305,610.915 

HO. 420, 700. 550 

115,320.525,740.955 

1230, 330. 6J0. 930 

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4ANSFIEID PARK 111 MM. 235. 455. 715, 935 



•, i 



■ 



B 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



January 28, 2000 



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BIG BLUE EYES 
Bubbly, goal-cnenled SWF, 42. 5'6\ lull-liguted.'wiih blonde 
Iuj, whose interests include movies, {gardening, the outdoors 
.Hid swimming, wants lo lint) a down-lo-earth. humorous 
^'.V!.l 30-40 who s drug tree, a non-smoker and lighl drinker 
Ad« 7982 

TOPS THE LIST 
Attractive SWPF 34. 5T, 110*5 . petite, with da* hair and 
ha;el eves would en,cy sharing He with a lomantc. M and 
N S SWPM 35---3. who enjoys movies, line dinmg. the theater 
■inddancmg Adi B317 

YOU NEVER KNOW 
K.Brl SHF. 55 5". I40tbs. with blown hair.'eyes. who ttnpys 
reading waging and watching movies, has hopes ol meeting 
an honest, easygoinn, SM under 57. Fl'S Ad" 1237 

SINGS HER HEART OUT 
Aitiaclnm. fiienofy. intelligent professional SWF. 43, ST with 
blond hair and hotel eves, who enjoys traveling, (he country 
and singing is in seaich cl a tall handsome, conlrdenl SWM. 
34-46 Adi.8512 . 

HUMOROUS 
Gubbly energetic, kind SWF. 42. 5'4". 1251)5. with brown 
Fiair/eyes who enjoys Ihe ouldoors, camping and lishing is in 
scatcholalun romantic, slm SWM, 35-17 for friendship Nrsl 

M»,\m 

FRIENDS TO START 
Friends say she's a sometimes oik-i always Iriendty and 
runny SWF. 54. 57*, 170 bs , wlh blonde hair and brown eyes. 
whom Ihey love spending lime with She Ikes country muse 
dinners out woodworking and seeks a similar SWM. 45-60 
AU* 5654 

ACTIVE & BUBBLY 
Nee easygoing SWF. El. 5'. I20lbs . with dark brown eyes, 
who enioys pomg tor walks, buds and Ihe ouldoots. is hoping 
lo meet .inactive SWM 58-70 NVS.Adi.1405 
SWEEP ME OFF MY FEET 
This giving humorous SWCF. 35. 5'3*. 250ts . with salt and 
pepper hau and brown eyes who likes reading, going to Ihe 
movies. Irawelmg and anlques. a seeking an outgoing, inle»- 
gent SWM 35-nO who knows what he wants out of lite 
Aril 1599 

OONT WAIT 
This sweet SWF. 49, ST t!5bs. who enpys dancing spend- 
ing lime wirt lamih/ and decoralng her home, is looking lor a 
youngatheart SVVM. over 44 Adi 4180 

BE SURE TO CALL 
Heres a dehghlluL vivacious SWPF. 40 5T. lOObs, win 
brown hau/eyes who wanls to spend lime with an honest, 
goodhumoied SWM tinder 4B. who shares her Interests in 
leading classic muse, and old movies Ad< 3232 
WHAT AREYOU SEEKING? 
Sties a tunny DW mother ol two 34. 5 5" with blown hau and 
hazel eyes who en{oys bowling, movies and long waits with 
that specoi someone. II you ie an honest SWM 33-39 like 
children and interested in a possible LTR it could be you so 
can today Ad» 2701 

A GENTLEMAN W ft NT ED 
Outgoing humorous. down-to-earth SWF, 4B 55" who enpys 
classical ca's Ihe theater and movies, is seeking a kind SWM, 

under S3 Am IS'1 

PICK UP THAT PHONE 
Attractive and energetic, this DWF. 67, S'9'. enjoys dancing 
etunngs at the theatre and keeping active ouldoors II you're 
a Cirrvlar SWM. 60-69 and ready lor a great new Inend, leave 
a message loday Adi 11 78 

GREAT EXPECTATIONS 
This hardworking, honest SWF. 34. 5'4*. DOlbs. with brow'n 
hair eyes, who enjoys dining out. going lo Ihe movies and 
dancing is looking lor a mature, down-lo earth SWM. 30 -43 
lot companionship. Ad* ,5752 

DON T WAIT 
The educated SY/F. 43. SB', with bbnde hair and btue eyes 
who enjoys polling skiing working oui and Ircwcbng is inter- 
i-. •'•-.! in meeting up with an ambitious SVV PM, 42-49. with sir- 
,:.ii ir.ietests lor Inendshe lust Adi 37B4 
COMMON BONO 
y't.iim hif;nd!y DWF. 52. 52". with blonde hair and btue eyes, 
a N S who enpvs travel, long walks and challenging conver- 
sation, is ISO an active, physcatty fit SWM 46-62. who Ms 
k is ol riuality lime to share Adi 51-01 

JENNIFER LOPEZ LOOKS 
Pielly happy SWF, 27, 57", I20lbs . with brown hai-'eyes. 
wlio t-npriys working oui. gardening and the outdoors She's 
'.(■i >inrj a nee Inendfy SWM Tor possible reianonship 
Ad» 9358 

HEAR ME OUT 
Ouict SW mom. 36, 53". who enjoys gardening, reading 
cooking and spending time with net children is interested in a 
tamily-oriented kind SWM 36-4S II lha sounds like you give 
her j can Adi .1549 

KEEP YOUR SPIRITS HIGH 
Caring and lun loving SWF. 59. 5'S". a pretty blue-eyed 
brunette, who enjoys dung out concerts, traveling and much 
more She's ISO an honest SWM. 55-70. who's young al heart 
and shares smibr interests Ad» 297S 

HELLO, IT'S ME 
SAF. 19 51*. I209JS.. wlh black har and brown eyes, who 
likes Singing dancing and moie, is looking lor a sweet roman- 
|« SAP,i 20-25. to spend quality hma with Act- 7SG5 

HAVE FAITH 
Th's SWF. 49, who enpys woikmg out. playing the guitar and 
taking long walks in the park is looking lor a SWM, 45-56. tar 
a possfcle long term relations!)? Ad* 3853 

UP TO LIFE'S CHALLENGES 
Bubbly, outgoing SWF. 38. 59". 170*5 . with brown hair and 
blue eyes, who enjoys Ihe outdoors, motorcycling horseback 
rriing and more, is looking lot a responses SWM over 40 
who knows Ihe importance ol communication Adl.7317 

TOUCH OF CLASS 
Adventurous, spm1u.il SWF, 39, 55'. 130 Is , with blonde hair 
and hazel eyes, who enjoys scuba d«mg, sailing snow skiing 
cuddkng and sunsets, is interested in meeting an honest. 
active SWM. 35-45. vino's ready lo be a great dance partner 
Adi 3563 

KISS ME FOR NO REASON 
Humorous aiiracirve. slender SWF. 47. S'9*. with blonde har 
and blue eyes, enjoys quiet evenings, romantic dinners, cud- 
dling by a displace and dressing up, is tookmo lor an active. 
monogamous, alfechonale SWM, 48-53. over 6" Adi.9524 

LIFE, LOVE & LAUGHTER 
This hones), pietty SWF, 22. S'9'. I40bs. a blue-eyed 
brunelle, ts an easygoing romanlc who enpys sports, moves, 
dining out. and long walks. Are you Ihe handsome, sincere 
SWM 20-29. who can make her laugh? Adi 8820 

THE SEARCH IS OVER 
Energetic and outgoing SWPF. 35. S'5\ I35bs . with brown 
hair and Fiajet eyes: woo enjoys ihe outdoots. movies and 
romantic walks, ts seeking an uterestmg and humorous 
SWPM 27-42. Adi. 7638 

SERIOUS REPLIES 
Aclr^e. humorous, employed SWF. 55. 5'3\ 125"os. wUi 
biown hal and hazel eyes, who enioys crntts. dming oui and 
ilancng is seeking a dean-cut. active, monogamous, tall, 
handsome SWM, 47-60. HIS. Ad* 5743 

COLOR MY WORLD 
Fun loving and aJtracline SWF. 27. 5?'. IoOUjs . with reddish- 
biondn hau and blown eyes who enjoys singing, dancing and 
the outdoors, is seeking an honesl. energetic and mature 
SWM. 25-40. lot friendship lust Adi.3850 

GET GOING 
Don't hesitate lo call tins pleasant, outgoing SWF. 19, a 55'. 
slender cube wlh brown for, and green eyes, who warts lo 
find that special guy. a considoral e. good- loolunp SWM. 1 8-23. 
lo share a meaningful telalDrtship. Adi 3 734 

HERE'S YOUR OPPORTUNITY 
Reserved, shy SWF, IB. S'10'. 150bs , with brown hair/eyes. 
enjoys shopping, shooting pool and bowling Her head is set, 
on meeiing a lall, kind SWM, 18-20. WS, non-dmker, who's a 
real gentleman, can you hejp? Adi 5679 

HOW ABOUT DINNER? 
You'll enjoy spending lime with her. Ihls sponiarvaous SWF, 57. 
5 4* O&Us . w«h btown hair'eyes. She likes cycling, garage 
sates, movies and wants to meel you il you're a compattie 
SWM. 59 C5 Adi.3831 

WALK HAND IN HAND 
Her Iriends would assure you she's an easy-going rial lhai 
enjoys movies, walks and community e«en!s Ins SWCF, 33, 
5 5' with brown hair/eyes that seeks companionship wlh a 
spiritual SCM 28-36 Adl.4t52 



Look for Personals every Friday in the Lakeland Newspaper. 



A GOOD MATCH " 

Fit and actrve SWPF.-44. 5'5", JlSbs., who enpys ad. con-put* 
ci r > kcV boring and yoga, is seeking a SWPM, 37-56. lor com- 
panionship. Adi.4237 

GENTLE ON MY MIND 
I'm a warm-hearted, attractive SAF. 40. 55", )20lbs , M'S. who 
is locking lot a caring, affectionate SWM. 39-50. for a meaning- 
lul leiaionship Ad»9888 . 

SHARE THE GOODTIMES 
Enetgehc spontaneous SWPF 26, 5 8". with blonde hair and 
btue eyes, who enpys the outdoors, spens and travel, is ISO an 
active, handsome SWM. 25-32, who shares common mimesis 
Adl.4414 

TOGETHERNESS 
WWWF. 75. 53". with sail and pepper hair, who enjoys the the- 
ater, socializing shopping and traveling, is in search of a talka- 
tive SWM. 75-80. lo spend time with Adi 55 B 9 

GETTOKNOWME 
This outgoing, ailiacirve SWF. 19. 53". 13Qtbs , with blonde hair 
and biown eyes, enjoys movies, spods and the outdoors, is 
seeking a tnendly. honesl and outgoing SM, 20-25, who enjoys 
all aspects ol Me Adi 5607 

NEW TO THE AREA 
Prolessonal. outgoing SWF. 56. who enjoys music, dming out 
and more, is In search ol an upbeat, honesl. family oriented 
SWM. 50-70 Ad* 9898 

GREEN ACRES 
City girl turned country, this sincere, personable SW mother ol 
two. 43. 5'7*. 1 45t)5., a green-eyed bbnde. who enjoys outdoor 
aciivites. country muse. Ihe beach, and dogs, is seekrtg a lit, 
canng SWM. 38-46, who likes chiMren Adi 7263 

THEATER LOVER 
Provocalrve. passionate, playful, positive SWPF. 52, M'S. a viva- 
cious redhead, who loves variety, seeks an acinic, well-' 
groomed, romantic, degreed, generous, accomplished SWPM, 
US. 47-57, a soul male lor laughing. Irving and loving Ad* 8992 

LASTING MEMORIES 
Bubbly, spontaneous SWF. 54, 57*. with dark brown hair/eyes, 
who enjoys nnlques, reading. Ilea markets and more, is inter- 
ested in meeting an attractive, humorous SWM. 55-65. who 
wants lo live lor ihe future. Adi 8028 

CAN YOU RELATE? 
If you re a W$. lad back SWM, 25-35. who Ikes children, and 
warns lo settle down, then can this humorous, fun SW mom. 28. 
5'4". medium build, wlh dark blonde hau and blue eyes Family- 
centered, she enjoys.lhe outdoors and hiking Adi. 74 1 7 

ONCE IN A LIFETIME 
Youl have fun with this sell-employed SHF. 27. 57*. I40fes . 
with bghl brown hair/eyes, who enjoys quiet evenngs al home, 
horseback riding and Ihe opera, seeks thai special SWM, 24-40, 
who has a kmd heart and loving eyes. Adi B912 

DESERVING 
Acinia. romantic SWF, 51. 5T, with blonde hair and green eyas, 
who enjoys dancing, traveling and theater, s looking lor an hon- 
esl. creatrve SWM. 48-60. 5 !0*+, who shares similar interests 
Adi 8175 

IS IT YOU? 
Attiadive, US DWPF, 47, S'5*. with blonde hw and graen eyes, 
who enjoys theater, muse, travel, and nature, rs ISO a hand- 
some educated SY/PM. 44-54. who is looking (of a quatiy rela- 
lonship Adi 6858 



TAKE NOTICE 
Outgoing, employed SW mother, 29, S'8". is descrfacd as a gor- 
geous green eyed blonde. She enjoys dancing, movies, theater 
and reading, and would love lo meel an intelligent, considerate, 
handsome SWM. 30-30, Ad* 8978 

A CHURCH-GOER 
SWF. 63. 5'4". with blonde hair and hazel eyes, who enjoys wtl- 
mg. swimming and traveling, is id search ol a stra'qhi-forwanj. 
honesl SWM. 56*65. Atfi. 9793 

VIRGO 
SWF, 50. ST. HOtfcs. with blonde hat and hazel eyes, who 
enjoys reading, dining out. movies, dancitg, taklig walks and 
more, is hoping to meet a SWM. 48-55. Ad*. 6340 

TENDER HEART 
Outgoing, lun SBF. 39. 5'T, I47bs . with long black hair and 
brown eyes, enjoys rollerbtadng. Ihe outdoor, swimmng. and 
movies. She is seekng a sincere, canng SWM, 40-45. Children 
welcome. Adi.1421 

NEW HORIZONS 
Movies, quiet dinners and jazz are jusl a few interests of hers. 
Ihis humorous, personable WWW mom. 52, 52". with dark 
hair/eyes. So i you're a compatible 5WM. 46-56, be sure lo can 
today. Adi 2799 

DESIRES OF THE HEART 
Mature SWF, 19. 5T, tOBlbs , who enjoys going lo Ihe movies, 
spending lime with Iriends and more, is looking tor a SM over 
1B. who knows whal he wants out ol He Ad«.6042 

CHEMISTRY.., 
Is what Ihis tun-loving retired bul active SWF, 68. 5'S*, 145ts. 
who Ikes the theater, dming out and Iravelng Is looking tor in 
you. i you're a (unloving, fnendly SWM, 65-76, Fir's Adi.676 1 

THE MOON & STARS 
Humorous, loving and employed SW mother of one. 42, 5'6". 
1 30 las . with red hair and brown eyes, who enjoys muse danc- 
ing, reading, speds. horseback riding, and camping, is seeking 
an affectionate, caring SWM. 40-50 Adi 8647 
SOMEONE SPECIAL 
OuibI SWF. 50, SI'. 125bs . with biown hair and green eyes, 
who enjoys long walks, exercising, canoeing. mov>es and con- 
certs, is seeking an inieUgenl. outgoing, hones), humorous 
SWM. 46-55. Adi.9331 

SOMEONE JUST UKE YOU 
Motorcycles outdoor sport I and auto racing are interests ol this 
corneal DWP mom, 38, 5'6". wit h brawn hau and blue eyes . She 
is hoping to meet a SWM. 40-55. with srrmlar interests. Ad* 8935 

ALL WE NEED 
Honesl. energetic SWF, 37, 5'6\ 1 1 fes , wuh dark bbnde hair, 
who likes boating, biking and spending tune with famiV, is look- 
ing lor a secure, honesl SWM. 35-45, for a possible long-term 
relationship. Adi 9779 

ONLYTHEBEST 
Independent, secure SWF. 49, 5'6*, 1 25 bs . wnh long brown hai 
and hazel eyes, is seeking a handsome, honesl SWPM, 40-59. 
S' ID'*. MS Her favorite adwties include travel, music, theater, 
sports, elFmc cuoine and quxH limes alhome. Adi.6138 

ITS DESTINY 
Here she ts. a SWF. 35. 5'4*. a shapely, blue-eyed blonde who 
enjoys movies, muse, dming out. spans and outdoor activities 
Her choice will be a trim, athletic SWM. 30-40. who shares her 
love of animals and is interested in friendship Ad 1. 7094 



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A MAGNETIC ATTRACTION 

Friendship is foremost on Ihe mind ol Ihis warm, caring DWPF, 
57. peine slender, wlh brown hair and blue eyes, who enjoys 
golf, muse dancing, and spilled conversation Her choce wul 
be a good humored, dependable SWF/. 50-69. with simitar inter- 
ests Adi 1945 

A NEW WORLD 
This physcalFy fit SWPF, 42. 5'6\ 165031.. with biom ha» and 
eves, is ISO a well-educated, affectionate SWM. 42-55. who 
snares hei interests m ballet, classcal music, movies, dming out. 
wafting ant more Could you be him? Adi 8642 

MAGICAL MOMENTS 
Adventurous, good-headed SWF. 37, 5'8\ ISOIbs , vrth brown 
hair'eyes. who enjoys Ihe great otrtdoon. racquetbal and cook- 
ing, is seeking a compatible SWM. Adi.7408 

OUTGOING 
Laugh and enjoy life with this gieen-eyed brunette SWF, 36, F1/S. 
non-drinker Her interests include cooking, movies, music. 
horseback riding and dming out. and she seeks an adventurous, 
fun loving SWM. 35-50. with whom to share these IFungi and 
more. Adi 6805 

GOAL ORIENTED 
Fun. humorous SWF, 25, 5T, 1301)5 , with brown ha* and 
gieen eyes, enjoys movies, dung out. shimming, and playing 
volleyball. She is seeking a fun SWM, 25-30. win similar inter- 
ests Adi 7926 

SOMEONE UKE YOU 
Attractive, humorous SWPF, 47. petite a blue-eyed blonde who 
loves the outdoors and dancing, is ISO an aniactrve. humorous, 
active. SWPM, 39-49. *<*h sttong values. If (hat's you. call her 
Adi 7074 

FORE! 
This attractive, engaging DWPF, 45. peUe. a an avid poller, and 
is ISO a successful, active, lun-bving SWF/. 40-60, who likes 
polling travel, cultural activities, water sports and bcyclrg 
Xdl.5892 

RADIANT GLOW 
FncrvJs say she's a Sweet, kind and honesl SWF. 45. 53' 
1356s . with auburn hair and haiel eyes, that's a real ireal lo 
spend lime with She likes muse cooking, reading, and seeks a 
compatible SWM. 44 55, for a possible relationship Adi 3134 

ROMANCE 
Spend a kttte lime with her. this warm. InendJy SWF. 75. 5'S*. 
15X1)5 . will blonde hair and blue eyes She Ikes r^rdening. 
golf, tennis, and hopes lo meet a sm-i,&r SWM, 65-85. Adi 3285 

CONTACT ME 
Compassonaie SWF. 48, 5'S", lOStoi.. with red hau and Fwuel 
eyes, who likes dancing, music and long walks, is interested m 
meeting a SWM. 45-60. lor companionship Adl.7449 

ACCOMPLISHED 
Fun-loving SWF. 21, 5"9", with dark blonde hair and blue eyes, 
who enjoys sports, spending time wth friends and more, a took- 
tag lor a caring S0M. 20-30. lo go oui and have a good lime wrth. 
Ml 4169 

COULD LEAD INTO MORE 

Bul you won't know unless you cat llvi attractive, humorous 

S'i'.r. 65. S ?\ 1201)1 . with reddish-blonde hair and blue eyes. 

NrS, who enioys dining out, travel, movies, and romantic 

' evenings, seeks a similar SUM, 60-69 Adi.7151 



SHOWMEAROUNO 

Shy-at-lirst SWPF. 24. 5'4', wlh dark brown hair/ayes, an 
err.c toy cd student, who enjoys reading and playing sports. 8 ISO 
a SM, 20-29. who likes traveling lo go out with, and develop a 
Inendshp and more Adi 6958 

NOT TOO LATE 
Aniactrve SWF. 30, 5'4 *, 165bs , wnh blonde hair and blue eyes, 
who enjoys dming out, dancing and bifkards, would like lo meet 
a funiov>ng. romantic SWM, 25-39, who hal a good sense ol 
humor. Adi 5426 

COMFORTING 
This humorous SWF. 39, 57*. 172fcs, with brown eyes, who 
enjoys wrrtmg. summing and traveling, is seeking a SWM. who 
shares similar interests Adi 5046 

CARING AND HONEST 
Easygoing SWF. 40, 5', 105ts., K/S. wrth blown hair/eyes, who 
enjoys Harleys, bite riding, cooking, and muse is ISO a SWM. 
35-40. 5'9' plus, lor friend she fist. Adi,3322 

GENTLE LADY 
FuD-figuied SWF. 54. ST. with salt and pepper hair and brown 
eyes, who enjoys dming. dancing, shows, lairs, and flea markets, 
seeks an outgoing, caring SWM. lo share togetherness. 
Adi 3917 - 

COMFORTING 
Shy al first, this sweet SHF, 35. 5'4*. I6OO35. with brawn 
hair'eyes. *ho enjoys fishng, cook/ig and movies, is interested 
in meeting a nice ShM. 2840, 10 spend quality lima with 
Adi 2541 

WORTH ATRY 
This sweet, sincere SWF. 39, S'5', 175bs. wth led hair and 
blue green eyes, a student, who enjoys music. Ihe outdoots. and 
animals, is looking for an adventurous, inlelfcgent SW-HVNAM. 
under 47, wrth similar interests. Adi. 6665 

START OFF SLOW 
Fun -lov mg . caring SAF, 2 1 . 5*9'. wth brown hair and green eyes, 
who enjoys painting and drawing She's looking lor a kind, sin- 
cere, honest SM Adi. 7629 

ALWAYS CHEERFUL 
She's an easygoing, employed WWWF, 46, 53*. medium build, 
with blonde hair and green eyes. fJ/S, who enjoys walking, 
movies, bicycling, dming out and cuddkng. Can today if you'te a 
loving, commitment-minded SWM. 4055. 6>. Adi. 6705 

WORK OF ART 
Humorous SV/F, 61. 5'5", wlh brown hair and huel ayes, who 
enpys raading. spendng lime with friends and mote, is seeking 
a fun-loving, educated SWM. 54-68, hVS. lo go out and have a 
good lime wnh Aril 2520 

AS CLOSE AS YOUR PHONE 
Gel lo know this SW mom, 25, 57', a shapely, btue- eyed* blonde 
who enjoys music, leading and walks on the beach, seeks a sin- 
cere SM. 24-39. interested m sharing a mutually, rewarding rela- 
tionship Adi 5762 

QUIET NATURE 
Outgoing, genlle SWF. 46, S'8", who enjoys photography, cook- 
ing and movies, rs ISO a sincere, outgoing SWM, under 58. with 
similar interests, (or 8 monogamous relationship Adi. 1 545 




1-900-896-5999 



HIGH ON LIFE 
IntoB-gcnt. fun-loving SWM, 35. 5*1 1", 2750-S . with dark hau and 
light brown eyes, who enioys shopping, dining out end camping, 
is looking lo meel up with a mature SWF, over 35. who shores 
Similar interests, Adi 4771 

LIFE GOES ON 
This honesl, hardivorking SVVM. 45. 6'4', 200fcs . wrth brown 
hair/eyes, who enjoys dming out, gonq lo the movies and shop- 
ping, is looking 10 meet up wlh a fit SWF. 3545. lo spend qual- 
ity lime wlh. Adl.9794 

BACK TO THE BASICS 
Oulgomg SWM, 22, 6'4\ who enjoys muse, sports and more, ts 
looking forward to meeting an energelc. lun-tovmg SWF, 18-25.- 
who has a wtoe variety ofinleres's, Adi 8509 

LOTS OF LOVE 
This hardworking SWM. 45. 5' 10', 200fos. a student, who 
enjoys dming out concerts, nature walks, chldren and more, is 
seeking a sweet and peine SAF, 30-50. lor a possble future 
logether.Adl.7497 

EARTH ANGEL 
Outgorg. funny SHF^. 20. 5'lt '. with dark ha» and brown eyes, 
who enjoys sports, socialuing and traveling, is m search 0) a 
nee, sensi rve SF, 19-25. Adl.SI49 

ADVENTUROUS 
Athletic SWM. 44, 6*1*, l5l*s . wth brown hair and hue! eyes. 
who enjoys ihe outdoors, bikrg and rock climbing, is In search 
of a lomanlc and attractive SWF, 3543, who shares his love of 
We. Adi. 434 1 

AREYOU READY? 
This earing and helpful SWPM. 42. 5' 11*. 22Sbs. with brown 
hail and hue) eyes, is seeking a SWF, 3545, who shares his 
interests in boating, camping, fishing, talking and more. 
Adi. 1523 

SHARE THE GOODTIMES 
DW dad 42. Mho enioyi camprg. sling and classcal music is 
seeking a sincere, slender SWF, 3442, lor a possfcte ratal un- 
ship Adi 7316 

PARTY WITH FRIENDS 
Personable end outgoing, youl get along gieal wnh Ihis SWM. 
22. 63'. 240bs . who has brown ha 1 and blue eyes. He kkes 
sports, lime with friends and seeks a similar SF, over IB. 
Ad 1.7597 

AFFECTIONATE 
Open minded, creative SWM, 34, 6*. I95l>s.. with brown hair 
and bkie eyes, who enjoys coaling and more, a in search of a 
SWF, lor a possible relatonshc Act! 7179 

UP TO UFE'S CHALLENGES 
This outgoing SWM. 34. 5' 10', I75bs , wlh dark blond hair and 
brown eyes, enpys skiing, smwmob'ing, dirt bikes and martial 
arts. Hes in search ol a slender, attractive SWF, 2442. who 
must Ike pets and the outdoors Adi 9822 

STOP HERE1 
Quit) SHM. 27, S'11*. wnh black hair and green eyes, who 
enjoys swmmmg. going lor dir.es and movies, is hoping 10 
meel a SF, 20-30. For a possfcie relauonshp. Adi 8249 

DYNAMIC PERSONALITY 
Active. seX-emptcyed SHM. 42. 57'. t60bs. with black 
hau'eyes. who enjoys reslorng old cars, is seekng an attrac- 
tive, good-hearted SWF. 25-39. Ad* 3950 
CHECK IT OUTI 
Humorous SWM, 38. 6*1*. with blond hair and green eyes, who 
enioys sports. Ihe outdoor! and more, ts *i search of a SWF. 24- 
44. Adi 8210 

DYNAMIC CHARACTER 
This aiiracirve and Mafiganl SWPM 49, yil". )65bs. »4h 
dark hair'eyes. a Fl'S. v.nase mtoiests include comedy clubs, 
gourmet cooking, sports, romantic evenings and more, a ISO a 
US. secure and health-oriented SF. 3949 Ad* 31 Bl 

CLASSY MAN 
Attractive and appealng SWPM. 48. 5 8'. tSObs.. with brown 
hau/eyes. a Fi'S, who enjoys t/aveliig. scoring events, fine do- 
ing and more, is seeking SWF, 40-46, to spend qualiy line with 
Adi.8862 

MORETO LOVE 
This easygoing SWM. 22. 58*. I50bs, *nh biown haWeyes. 
who likes animals, quiet nights at home and more, wants to 
meel an open-moded SF, under 35 Adi 5225 

MANY OPTIONS 
Honest WYYWM, 70, 57'. 168bs. who enjoys going lo Ihe 
movies, traveling and qu«t nights at home, is toc*mg (w a sin- 
cere SV/F. 60-69, who shares similar mteresis Adi. 7398 

MAGIC IN THE AIR 
Humorous, honest SWM. 48. 6V 2iStbs. with brown 
hau/eyes. who enpys spons. movies, colecting sports cards 
and mote, is hopmo to meet a sincere SWF, 40-55. who's took- 
«vj for a possfcie lir Adi.4310 

LEAVE A MESSAGE 
Oulgofig SWM. 39, S'6\ ISObs. who enpys fahmg. ploymg 
gotl and swimming, ts hoping lo meet an honesl SF. 3545. lo 
spend lime wlh Adi 4572 

UNDERTHE MOONLIT SKY 
Oplimtslc. charming DWdad. 45, 57', I75bs . with brown ha* 
and Intel eyes, who enpys boa ling, fishing and walks in the 
park, is seeking a compassionate, spontaneous SWF, under 40, 
who's attracuvB wlh tong hair, lor a LTR. Adi 2632 

MAGIC IN THE AIR 
CFtarm ng SWM. 45,6*. 200bs , with black hau and brown eyes. 
who enpys music, movies, sports and more, is nteresied m 
meeting a humorous SWF. 30-60. lo go out and have a good 
lime with Adi. 1 304 

SEARCHING FOR REAL LOVE 
Outpong and humorous DW dad. 48. 6'. 200bs., w4h brown 
hai and blue eyes, who enjoys go*, eieidsing. dancing and 
more, ts tookiw (or an attracuve. slender ana warm-hearted 
SWF, 30-55. lor a possible LTR Adi B645 
MAKE IT HAPPEN 
Easygoing SWM, 43, 5'9". 165bs , with brown hair and huel 
eyes, who enpys some sports, classic rock music and Lakng 
walks, is interested in meeting an amblous SWF, 3545, for 
Inendshjp list, maybe more. Adi. 6614 

LOVE IS THE ICON 
Optimistic and adventurous SWM, 34. 6'. WOfos . with brown 
hair and blue eyes, who kkes vofleybal, traveling, concerts and 
dancing, is looking lor a down-to-earth, sincere and attractive 
SWPF, 26-38. who knows how lo have lun. Adl.5223 

MAGIC 
This honest, attractive DW dad ol two. 46. 5'1 1*. iBSbs . with 
datk blond hair and hue! eyes, has • holstc approach to We. 
and enjoys Ihe marital arts, bng walks, music, and quief nights 
He's seeking a physcaHy 14. warm-hearted SWF, under 46 
Adl475B 

AND WE'RE OFF 
Humorous SWM, 23, 5'6", 1456s , with blond hair and blue 
eyes, is looking tor a ftS SWF, 18 25. Mho has no tattoos or 
piercings. He enjoys sports, concerts, casinos and much more. 
Adi.JTO 

. END HIS LONLINESS 
Erelore new horuons with lum. Ihts sincere DWM, 56. 5'8*, 
1 Bubs . w4h gtey hair and blue eyes, who kkes walks, billiards 
and cooking dinnai toi thai special someone, a loving, tomantc 
SWF, 50-57, who's Interested in a LTR hopefully you, Adi 9112 

DONT WAIT 
Fun-loving SW1A, 45. 6"2 \ 19503s , wsh biown hair and blue 
eyes, who enjoys Ihe ouldoors. movies and rjMMDUl is took- 
irig for an open-minded, loving and carina SF. 30-50. who ts wil- 
ing la shart all aspects of love Adi. 8302 
INSIGHTFUL 
Humorous. Calholc SW dad. 43. S'9". 150bs . who enpys the 
ouldoors. is in search of an honest, educated, Cathode SWF. 29- 
37, M'S. who is not afraid of gating involved with his daughter 
also.Adi.6B01 

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY 
Quiet, (amity-oriented, employed DW dad of two, 27, 5'10*. 
250bs , wih brown ban and green eyes, who enjoys movies, 
outdoor activities and much mora, rs seeking an honesl. SWF, 
24-32 who kkes chddren. for fnendsho firs). Adi 8740 

EXCLUSIVE 

Warm, caring SWM. 44, 6, 175bs , who enpys going for walks. 

the outdoors and dming out. is in search of an honest, loving 

lelatonship wrth a S'rVF, 35-47. Adi 7488 

GOOD CATCH 

Here's a goodhurnored very charming SWM. 33, S'9*. 165bs, 

, wrlh brown hai/eyes. who wanla lo snare friendship and good 

> limes with a warm-hearted, attracuve SWF. 25-39. who enjoys 

reading, and a uide variety of outdoor activities Adi 9307 



ROAD TO ADVENTURE 

An outgoing, humorous guy that enpys tme with friends, 
sports and moves, this SWA- 23. 63". 175bs . wnh brown 
hair and gieen eyes seeks comparuonsnip with a simJar 
SWF, under 28 Adi34B5 

NO GAMES PLAYED HERE 
Check out this handsome SWM, 36. y 10*. 175bs, wih biown 
hau/eyes, who loves rock and. roll, outdoor activities and 
more. Ha hopes lo find thai special gal, a sweel and Sincere 
SWF, 34-39, who's interested in a LTR. Adi 2876 
. SOMEONE SPECIAL FOR ME 
Caring. alfect«nala and humorous descries Ibis SW dad. 
36. 6: 230bs . wnh dark blond hair and blue eyes, who kkes 
al outdoor activities, children end the movies, is bokrg for a 
serious SWF, under 42, who lies chddiin. lor a LTFL 
Ad 1.72 79 

OYNAMrTE 
This handsome SWPM. 30. 6*. I75bs . wlh brown hair and 
blue eyes, who kkes spons li/mg planes and boating, ts took- 
<ig [01 an aiiracirve SAPF. under 40. lo go out and have a 
good tine with. Adi. 7752 

LOOK NO FURTHER... 
Here's a down-to-earth SWM. 30, ST. wnh btond harr and 
btue eyes, who wil be a perfect match for a straightforward 
SWF. 25-35. who enpys long walks, movies, quiet evenings 
al home and more Adi. 4257 

STARRY NIGHTS 
Tail slim, healthy S WF.t, 55. WS. who enpys sailing, camp- 
ing, anmafs and vacalcns. is seeking an attractive SWF. who 
shares simiar interests Adi 7556 

WORTH ATRY 
Professional SWM. 52. 5'H', with blue eyes, who enjoys the 
outdoors, cookog and movies, ts looking lor a SWF, 3040. lo 
nave a good lm« wrth. Adi .5277 

NOT TOO LATE 
Handsome, humorous SWM,, 28, 5T. 235bs„ win brown 
hau and green eyes, who enjoys sports, working out, biking. 
Ihe outdoors and more, wants 10 meet a nee. attractive SWF, 
over 24. who has a good sense of humor. Adl.9982 

HELLO SUNSHINE 
Outgoing SAM, 29, ST. with black hair and blown eyes, 
enjoys playing soccer, movies and ipendmg lime with ho 
Incnds. He would kke lo meet t SWF. under 35, who shares 
in ha interests. Adi.1663 

ONE ON ONE 
Self-employed, physcally II DWM. 46. 5'8'. 140b! . with 
brown hair and huel eyes, who enpys cooking, muse, fine 
dining camping, movies and waits, ts seeking an effedDnaie 
SW7AF. 3846, lor a LTR Ad* .8074 

GOLDEN CHARMER 
Energetic, humorous SWPM. 35. S'10*. ISObs. wnh brown 
hair'eyes. who enpys ihe outdoors, helping neighbors. 
spendmg lime with friends and much more, is ISO a slender, 
fnendly SWF. 27-38, with a head of goto. Adi. 9438 

ALL TH ATS IMPORTANT 
This SWM. 65 years young, is seeking a no-slnngs attached 
1 eiaicnshfl with a refined SWF, under 58. II Ihn is you. gel set 
k) enpy concerts. candteU dinners, dancing and more wlh 
Ihis great guy. Adi 6 1 SB 

END MY SEARCH 
This personable SWM. 33. 5V. 16Sbs , wth brown hat. who 
kkes gcwig to Ihe movies meeting new people and more, is 
looking lor a fnendly SF. 25*47. who Ikes lo go oui and have 
lun.Adi.7305 

GOOD OUTLOOK ON LIFE 
Friendly and funny desobes Ihis SNAM. 33. 5*9". 250bs . 
win brown hau'eyes. who enpys going out with friends let** 
1 sen movies and cooking, ts seekng an outgeww SF lor a 
pcss4)le relaionsFnp and similar interests Adi 4845 

ENJOYS LIFE 
This handsome SWPM, 45. 67. 1 95 bs , wlh brown hai*. and 
btue eyes, who enjoys Ihe home front, ts seeking a tevmg. 
canng SWF, to shai* Ihe good limes m Ue with Adi.5279 

ANGELS WELCOME 
Spontaneous and easygoing SWM. 41, S'4', 210111.. w-Ui 
brown hau/eyes. who enpys sports, flea markets, museums 
and more, ts looking forward lo meetng an energetic, 
employed SAF, under 45. who enjoys Me Adi 6371 

ITHASTOBEYOUI 
Check out this adventurous SWM. 27. 5' 11". 210bs . wnh 
brown ha* and huel eyes, who would enpy he.11 ng (ram an 
attracuve SWCF, 25-35. who enjoys books, muse and 
movies. Adi 6176 

DYNAMIC PERSONALITY 
Honesl, adventurous, seO-emptoyed SWM. 37, ST, i&Gts . 
wnh brown hau and btoe eyes, who enjoys working out. sport- 
ng events, walking on the beach and romantc evennds, is 
seeking an attractive, outgoing, huinorous. lun-lcvtng SWF. 
28-39. Adi 4796 

ITS POSSIBLE 
This oulgomg SV/M. 54, who enpys boatng. playing got) and 
dancing. ■ nterested in meeting up wnh a slender SWF. 44- 
55. lo spend qualify lima wlh Adi 6343 

IS(TYOU7 
Intelligent, kind-hearted S8M. 39. 6'4'. I79t». who enjoys 
bng walks, good conversalon and more, is looking lot an 
attractive, spontaneous SWF, under 43. 10 spend quaity Um* 
wnh Adi 3039 

KIND & LOVING 
Humorous SWM. 40. 59'. 2C9bs . wlh tghl brawn hair and 
blue eyes who toves animals and tit. a interested n sharing 
his tov* lor life wnh a SF. for fiiendshn) first, maybe more 
Adi 5685 

GREAT CATCH 
Fun-bvng, energetic SWM. 22, 6' 5". ISSfcJ, with brown 
hair'eyes. who enpys movies, going lo clubs and more, is 
locking fiywardlo meeting a SF. 18-25.Adl.40l5 

MY HEART SMILES 
Spontaneous, outgoing SWPM. 30, 6*1", 200bs, wlh btond 
hair and bkia eyes, who enpys snowmobiing. movies and 
more. ISO an honest, smcei e SWF. 27-35. who ton es to laugh 
and has a pretty smile Ad*. 9661 

NO HASSLES 
Quiet, easy-gang SV/M. 43. ST, 1 Bibs . wnh brawn ha* and 
btoe eyes, who enjoys the outdoors, basebal. workrtg out 
and mora, is seeking a sincere SWF. under 40 Adi 5367 



Call 1 -800-407-631 B 

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• Enter 2 Females and Mates can pidt up their messages 
once every 7 dayi bi FREE. 

Call 1-900-896-5999 aIS2.19per rniute 

• Enter 1 lo respond to an ad. 

Enter 2 to browse voice meetings within ihe age range 
you specify. 

• Enter 3 li you already have an ad on the system or can' 
fidenltal malm and are picking up your messages or 
system matches 

Questions? Call our customer service repre- 
sentatives al 716-633-3209. 



M 


Mate 


B Black 


D 


.Divorced 


F Female 


H 


Hispanic 


C Christian 


W 


White 


A Asian 


S 


Single 


.WW Widowed 


N/S 


Non-smoker 


NA Native American 


P 


Professional 


J Jewish 


ISO 


In search ol... 




LTR 


Long-term relationship ' 



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January 28, zooo 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B1 1 






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bigger picture is 



what the 




Match the event with the year in which it occurred by 
drawing a line i&rom the left column to the right column. 
1 Super Bovvl XXXI . A. 1889. 

2. DemoliUon of Berlin Wall begins B. 1976 

5. GulfWar C. 1993 

4 U.S. bicentennial celebration D. 1945 

5. First man on moon E. 1997 

6. World Warn ends F. 1969 

7. President Clinton first inaugurated G. 1990 

8. "Home Alone" released * H. 1991 

Answers 

•l.E 2.A 3.H 4.B 5.F 6.D 7.C 8. G 




IN THIS YEAR, THE JJ.S: CONGRESS 
[E PACIFIC RAILWAY AGX AU- 
CONSTRUCTION OF THE 
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Newspapers 



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»CHPUBLfC»RYDIS 



Mimas 




* ■ »- = ■ 



COUNTY DIGEST 



LaCASA gets grant 

. The Lake County Council Against 
Sexual Assault (LaCASA) has an- 
nounced the receipt of a $25,000 
grant from the Chicago Community 
Trust to support its countywide sexu- 
al assault survivor advocacy pro- 
grams. 

The LaCASA/Zacharias Center is 
a non-profit organization that advo- 
cates on behalf of sexual assault sur- 
vivors. In the past two years, LaCASA 
has aided over 30,000 individuals. 

To find out more about LaCASA 
and how to become a volunteer or 
benefactor, call Ann Subry at 244- 
1187. 

Use caution around 
snow plows 

The Illinois Department ofTrans- 
portation is reminding motorists to 
slow down and use extra caution 
when driving near operating snow 
plows and orange trucks this winter 
season. 

"During the Wednesday-Thurs- 
day snowstorm 14 trucks were in- 
volved in accidents," said Jim Slifer, 
Director of IDOT's Division of High- 
ways. "Fortunately no serious injuries 
resulted, 

"We are asking motorists to take 
special care around snow plows 
which can cause near-whiteout con- 
ditions in the immediate vicinity of 
the plowing operation. It is difficult 
for both plow operators and mo- 
torists to see during these conditions. 




NO 
TO HOME RULE 

County could tax and 
spend without approval 

SEE PAGE C5 



BACK PAIN 

Get some information 
on the problem 

SEE PAGE CIO 



Thelen says it will not 
turn Wilmot Mountain 



into a 



By TIM O'DONNELL 
Staff Reporter 




quarry 



Lake County District 1 Board 
member Judy Martini is organizing a 
meeting of both Illinois and Wiscbn- 
sin officials to discuss their concerns 
about the pending purchase of 
Wilmot Mountain by Thelen Sand 
and Gravel, Inc., a gravel mining 
company that is already operating in 
Lake County. 

A meeting that was scheduled for 
Jan. 26 was postponed because there 
was not enough time to get it orga- 



nized, Martini said. 

Martini is worried about the im- 
pact that plans to turn Wilmot into a 
gravel pit would have of the county, 
especially the Gander Mountain for- 
est preserve, which is located just 
south of the Wilmot site. 

The forest preserve district has 
plans to build an extended trail sys- 
tem through the Gander area. How- 
ever, the additional dust that anoth- 
er gravel pit to the north would cre- 
ate could possibly drive away the 

Please see THELEN J. CIS 



Student patriots honored 
for democracy essays 



By ANGELA D.SYKORA 
Staff Reporter 



• Pride and patriotism for America 
filled the banquet hall of Sequoit Post 
4551 in Antioch this month. 

Seventeen Lake and McHenry 
County students were commended 
for participating in the Veterans of 
foreign Wars (VFW) Voice of Democ- 



racy essay contest 

The annual Fifth District ban- 
quet was attended by commanders,^ 
presidents and members of area 
VFW and Ladies Auxiliary posts, 
politicians, media, students and 
proud parents. 

Hosts for the evening were Dis- 

Please see STUDENT /CIS 




Jourdan Phillips accepts her award as 1st place winner of the 
"Voice of Democracy* essay contest, which was presented by 
Sharon Prokuskl, left, and Jim Michel, Right, during the VFW's 
Annual 5th District Voice of Democracy Banquet this month. — 
Photo by Klrsten N. Hough 




Memorabilia of St. Louis Rams defensive tackle Jerry Zgonina is 
featured in a display case at Carmel High School. Zgonina, a for- 
mer Carmel High School standout who later played at Purdue, is 
starting for the Super Bowl-bound St Louis Rams.— Photo cour- 
tesy of the Mundetein High School Hall of Fame 

■ 

CHS staff, friends proud 
of Zgoiiina's exploits 

Former Carmel star will play 
for Rams in Super Bowl 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter * 

'The trophy case at 
Carmel High School is re- 
ceiving a few more looks 
these days. 

That is because one 
of Carmel High School's 
very own will be playing 
in the biggest NFL game 
of all. Jerry Zgonina will 
play as a defensive tackle 
for the St. Louis Rams in 
the Super Bowl. 

"We can't believe he is going to 
the Super Bowl. The team has so 
much camaraderie. The players are 
like children for the older coaches," 




Zgonina: 

Senior photo from 

Carmel High 
School yearbook 



said Ginger Zgonina, his 
mom. 

"This Is the most in- 
tense game I ever knew. It 
was the biggest thrill," 
Zgonina said through a 
long-time friend. 

The celebration was 
actually pretty calm after , 
clinching the franchise's 
first Super Bowl trip in 20 
years. Zgnonia made the 
most of his opportunity, 
as he was high on the 
team's tackle and quar- 
terback sack statistics. 

Ginger and Jeff's dad, Cass, will 



Please see ZGONINA /C16 



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C2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 28; 2000 




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426 Lake St 

(847)395-6230 

McHenry 
5102 W. Elm St 
(815)385-8630 

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Fox Lake 

2 W. Grand Ave 

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Round Lake 
629 W. Rollins Rd 
(847)546-4862 



Gurnee 
6695F Grand Ave 
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Wauconda 
474B W. Liberty St 
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00 



January 28, 2000 



COUNTY 



Lakeland Newspapers /G3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 




I 



•i 



Public reacts to Chamberlain's accusation 

Gwnee— Many members of the public went to the 
Gurnee Village Board meeting on Jan. 24 to support Village at- 
torney Barbara Swanson, 

Svvanson had been accused of creating a conflict of inter- 
est by Trustee Tom Chamberlain when she apparently repre- 
sented both the village and a private citizen in a land deal. 

Chamberlain was barraged with jeers and heckling from 
the audience. Even former trustee Gus Petropoulos expressed 
his disappointment with Chamberlain's actions. 

"I don't know what rock you crawled out from under, 
Tom," he criticized. "You are very seldom positive about any- 
thing—what a waste of a great mind!" 

Chamberlain stuck to his beliefs through the meeting, 
countering attacks with affirmations of his stance. 

"She cannot work for two clients. At what point does rep- 
resentation start— when we make an offer? If that's the case, 
then we don't need her there when wo are just discussing 
property." 

Snowmobile accident kills teen 

Wauconda— A Wauconda High School student died as a 
result of injuries sustained in a snowmobile accident. 

The 16-year-old male, Benjamin Lavendure, suffered a 
traumatic arrest, according to Wauconda Fire Department 
personnel. The incident took place Jan. 19 at 6:40 p.m. near 
DarrellRd.andRte. 176. 

"It is affecting his close friends and others who knew him. 
We have had counselors and a crisis team available," John 
Rayburn, Wauconda High School principal, said. 

Lavendure was a biking enthusiast. 

"He was a very nice young man," Rayburn said. "It impacts 
everyone." 

In another snowmobile incident, Dan Lamz, ofCary, was 
rescued on the Fox River by Wauconda Fire Dept. personnel 
after he called on a cell phone on Jan. 23. 

Mundelein resident, 2 others arrested 

Mundeleiii — Three people have been arrested in con- 
nection to a string of animal hospital burglaries around Lake 
County. 

Marissa J. Arteaga, 19, of Mundelein, Glenn E. Trauthwein, 
19, of Waukegan and a 16-year-old male from Chicago were 
taken into custody on Jan. 21. 

The arrests of these three have closed burglary investiga- 
tions of the Mundelein Animal Hospital, Beach Park Animal 
Hospital, Antioch Animal Clinic, Grayslake Animal Hospital, 
Best Friends Animal Hospital in Grayslake, Round Lake Ani- 
mal Hospital and Lake Zurich Animal Hospital. 

The arrests of these three subjects were the result of a 
meeting initiated by the Lake County Sheriffs Office with oth- 
er county law enforcement agencies experiencing similar 
break-ins. 

Investigators from Lake County and Dekalb worked closely 
together to discover that the suspects were planning to bur- 
glarize a veterinary clinic in Dekalb. 

On Jan. 21, Trauthwein and the Chicago juvenile, who was 
reported as a runaway to the Chicago Police Department in 
October 1999, were arrested while burglarizing the Dekalb 
veterinary clinic. Arteaga was arrested later that day. 

"This is a prime example of the results that can be 
achieved when law enforcement agencies work together," 
commented Lake County Sheriff Gary Del Re. 

Alternative revenue petition ruled invalid 

Aiitioch— Two strikes against the petitioners came out of 
the Antioch electoral board's review of petitions and counter 
petitions. 

The board announced after about two hours of review on 
Jan. 21 at the Lake County Courthouse, two sections of the pe- 
titions against the village's move to sell industrial revenue 
bonds arc invalid. 

A third part of the petition, dealing with opposing the vil- 
lage's desire to pursue alternate revenue bonds, was upheld. 

Of the signatures disallowed, 20 were printed instead of 




Jenkins signs 

Former Chicago Cubs pitching star Ferguson Jenkins 
signs an autograph at the Cubs Convention. Jenkins, 
a Hall of Famer, was one of many former Cubs at the 
three-day convention, attended by many diehard Lake 
County Cubs fans. — Photo by Steve Peterson 

written, which is not allowed, and 43 were not registered voters, 
according to the Lake County Clerk's records. 

A minimum of 323 valid signatures was necessary for the 
petitioners to have the request for the issuance of alternative 
revenue bonds be placed before the voters in a referendum. 

The village board is expected to eventually make a decision 
on the alternate revenue bonds question being brought for- 
ward in a referendum. 

School district struggling 

Round lake— The future of Round Lake School District 
116 could be in jeopardy if their educational fund tax increase 
referendum docs not pass on March 21. 

State Superintendent Glenn "Max" McGee, recommended 
appointment of an oversight panel to take financial control of 
the district, which is $9.7 million in debt. 

The state board will wait until the results of the district's ref- 
erendum questions are in before they seriously consider it, 
though. 



Voters will be asked to approve a $14.5 million building 
bond referendum and a 45 cent educational fund tax in- 
crease. 

Increased enrollment and restrictions on class size, a past 
strike, building repairs and a large percentage of bilingual and 
special needs students have all contributed to the district's 
troubles, said board members. 

School gets feedback from parent survey 

Lake Villa— Just three days after sending out surveys, 
Lake Villa School District 41 is already getting a response. 

District 41 sent out surveys to district families asking for 
their input on what to do about the population growth the 
communities are currently going through. 

The survey covers a number of different issues including 
the possibility of making district 41 schools into kindergarten 
through 4th grades and 5th through 6th grades, with Palombi 
holding only 7th and 8th grades. Palombi currently holds 6th 
through 8th grade students. . J } 

"No matter what happens with this, Palombi has to become 
a 7th and 8th grade school," Dr. Michael Anderson, District 41 
superintendent, said. "There's just no more room." 

The survey also covers other topics such as small tax in- 
creases and a referendum. 

Chamber announces new board 

Round Lake Beach— The Round Lake Area Chamber of 
Commerce has announced its new board members. 

Replacing Jordan Primack as president is Jill Gross, of the 
First State Bank of Round Lake. 

Vice president will be Craig Kressner of State Farm Insur- 
ance. Richard Hill, Round Lake Beach Trustee and ACE Hard- 
ware manager, will serve as treasurer. Secretary will be Tom 
Yingling of New Century Real Estate. 

Darlene Eldridge, of Professional Temporaries, Inc.; Janet 
Galati of the Advertiser; and Jordan Primack, attorney, will 
serve three year terms as chamber directors. 

An instillation banquet will be held Feb. 12. 

Developers to propose commuter housing 

Grayslake — Prairie Crossing developers will again pre- 
sent a proposal for additional units to Grayslake Village Board 
and Planning Commission at a meeting Feb. 1. 

Led by Vicky and George Ranney, Prairie Holdings Corpo- 
ration sought to add 65 additional units to the Prairie Cross- 
ing development at the Jan. 10 Grayslake Planning Commis- 
sion meeting. The presentation proposed rearranging the 
original plan, approved in 1993, to create Station Village adja- 
cent to the proposed Metra train station. 

The new plan called for 141 single-family homes with a ' 
small mixed office, retail and commercial area to be built sur- 
rounding the new Metra station. This plan would relocate 76 
of the previously permitted homes to this area to become part 
of Station Village. 

The Ranneys presented studies that show the homes with- 
in walking distance of transit reduce work-related auto traffic 
by more than 25 percent. 

The revised pian "provides larger expanses of open space, 
a less fragmented environment for animals, birds and plant 
life, and innovative interior greens in the Station Village," ac- 
cording the Ranneys. The amount of open space remains the 
same as the original plan. 

Native designs car for Super Bowl 

Wadsworth— Wadsworth native John Shepperd, who 
owns a graphic design company in Kenosha, airbrushed a car 
to look like a football for Wilson sports. It will appear in the 
Super Bowl on Jan. 30. 

Approximately 45 hours of work went into transforming 
the car into a giant football. 

Shepperd said there is talk that Walter Payton's son will 
drive the football car onto the field and present the game ball. 

Shepperd said after the Super Bowl, the car will go on a 
major city tour for children's events and then be auctioned off 
on e-Bay with proceeds going to United Way. 





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.-I 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



January 28, 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/ 
Operations Manager 



Robert Warde 

Managing Editor 



30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edlt@lnd.com 



EDITORIAL 



Same page view 
needed for growth 

If Philip Rovang, Lake County's new director of planning and de- 
velopment, is settling in gingerly, his caution is understandable. 
Rovang has one of the most thankless public sector jobs imagin- 
able, trying to find rhyme and reason in a region where growth 
and development are careening out of control. 

From what we can tell, though, Rovang Is getting off to a good 
start, beginning his new job by putting a high priority on getting 
county and village officials to start speaking the same language re- 
garding the tumultuous growth story, Good luck. 

For two decades or more, county planners and local municipali- 
ties have been reading from different books. The result is that our un- 
controlled growth arguably is ruining the lives of citizens. The widely- 
held perception is that the county has done a miserable job managing 
growth. Wrong. The misconception led County Board Rep. Larry Leaf- 
blad (R-Higliland Lake) to grouse, "The little puny county doesn't have 
the power that the big, bad municipalities have." Noted for his color- 
ful, often salty analogies, Leafblad as chairman of the County Board's 
Planning, Building and Zoning Committee, was attempting to show 
how independently acting municipalities, all 52 of them, have fol- 
lowed piecemeal growth strategies. The resulting mish-mash is best il- 
lustrated by driving bumper-to-bumper cross county to 1-94 or check- 
ing the bulging classrooms in your school district. 

Some boldness can be recommended for Rovang as he plows 
ahead enlisting the support of municipal officials in collaborative 
planning. Rovang commented recently that little is known about "die 
real costs of a new home" in Lake County as compared to cost of ser- 
vices rendered and real estate taxes paid. 

That isn't what we understand that nagging bugaboo, convention- 
al wisdom, to be. Old CW has held for more than four decades that a 
new single family residence "doesn't pay" its own way in services. 

Shortly after Rovang spoke at a meeting where year 2000 goals and 
aims were reviewed, Libertyville Township Supervisor Mike Graham, a 
long-standing foe of unbridled growth and development, produced 
information from a Washington based study group that every new 
house costs taxpayers $32,945, and $16,167 for each additional person. 
Graham added for good measure a scary statistic — each single-fami- 
ly house added 10 auto trips daily to already clogged roadways. 

With south Lake County already reeling from more than 10 years 
of super-heated growth, Leafblad provided a grim picture for the fu- 
ture of northwest Lake County. He said there's a good chance another 
8,000 residences will be added to Antioch, Fox Lake, the Round Lake 
area, Hainesville, Lake Villa and Lindenhurst. He described vehicles 
alone from this projected growth to being the equivalent of the com- 
bined total of spectators at Soldier Field, Wrigley Field, Sox Park, Taste 
of Chicago and United Center hitting local highways every day! 

Add to this traffic from communities like Grayslake, Gurnee and 
Mundelein that still are growing at a brisk pace. Besides managing in- 
creased traffic, the county and villages can and must work together on 
flood control, distribution of water and sewer service, providing for 
affordable housing, sharing the burdens growth places on schools, 
and quality of life issues. 

Philip Rovang has his work cut out. Lake County still is a great 
place with a bright future. Rovang has our sincere wishes for success. 
Let's hope our village fathers and staff professionals have the good 
sense to see the benefits of collaborative planning. 



County Home Rule 
rule it out 



As Yogi Berra said, "It's like 
deja-vu all over again." It 
was just a little over a year 
ago when SenatorTerry 
Link (D-Vemon Hills) said that he 
would introduce legislation to allow 
the Lake County voters to elect the 
Lake County Board chairman rather 
than the members of the board. 
That raised some feathers, and, 
thank goodness, the legislation nev- 
er saw the light of day. 

Now comes Senator William Pe- 
terson (R-Prairie View) who said at a 
legislative luncheon with the County 
Board that they should go to the vot- 
ers and seek home rule powers. Sen- 
ator Link supported the suggestion, 
but everyone else seemed to be 
silent on it except the outgoing 
County Board Chairman Jim LaBelle 
who thought that the proposal 




SEEING 

IT 

THROUGH 

John S. Matijeuich 



"would be 'worth a shot" 

It's worth a shot, alright— "TO 
BE SHOT DOWN." Home rule pow- 
ers would give the county greater 
powers to tax the citizens without 
going to referendum. My guess is 
that Senator Peterson was tiring of 
the County Board coming back to 
the legislature time after time seek- 
ing their authority to enact a gas tax 
Increase. In effect, he was saying, go 

Please seeHOME RULE /C5 




VIEWPOINT 



Fitness fans dwell 
in center of county 



What area of Lake 
County has the most 
physically fit resi- 
dents? 
judging from enrollment figures 
at workout centers, the highest per- 
centage of fitness fans reside in a 
corridor bordered by Rte. 45 on the 
east and Rte. 83 on the west running 
from Mundelein north to Antioch 
and Lindenhurst. 

OK. There's a big difference be- 
tween being fit and working at being 
tops physically. But there seems to 
be more men, women and children 
working on their well being in cen- 
tral Lake County. 

Last Saturday, Lake Forest Hos- 
pital officially opened a new fitness 
center on Rte. 45, Lindenhurst, with 
more than 1,000 persons enrolled. 
The two-story 60,000 square foot fa- 
cility including a swimming pool is 
designed to serve residents of 
Gurnee, Lake Villa, Antioch and 
Grayslake. 

The new center with a staff of 60 
will be competing for members in 
the same area where the full-service, 
well-established Hastings Lake 
YMCA operates at a location be- 
tween Lake Villa and Lindenhurst, 
with a membership now exceeding 
5,000, A pool and adjoining fitness 
center are only a few of the ameni- 
ties offered at the Y, whose service 
area duplicates the Lake Forest Hos- 
pital center besides including Fox 
Lake, Spring Grove and the Round 
Lake area. 

Last summer the Hastings Lake 
Y opened the Grayslake YMCA, a 
high tech fitness facility at Rte. 45 
and Rte. 120, whose membership al- 
ready exceeds 1,000. Condell Hospi- 
tal established the standard for 
modern health and fitness centers 
15 years ago with the establishment 
of the Centre Club, drawing mem- 
bers from mostly the Libertyville 
and Mundelein area. 

The telephone directory lists an 
even two dozen health and fitness 
centers, divided among for-profit 
and not-for-profit enterprises. Is 
there a limit to the number of health 
and fitness that a given locality can 
support? Maybe so, but it doesn't 
seem like central Lake County is at 
that point yet. 

Marti Derleth, an executive with 
the Lake Forest Hospital Founda- 
tion's Health and Fitness Institute, 
said the new Lindenhurst facility 
was prompted by people who re- 
quested a center close to where they 
live and work. Jim Scherer, director 
of the Hastings Lake Y, sees an un- 




BKLL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



limited future. 

From children to senior citizens, 
there is a wide choice of workout 
styles in a wide variety of price 
ranges. Aerobics, free weights, ma- 
chines, track, swimming, massage, 
tanning, strength training, tennis, 
recquet ball, personal training. It's 
all there. And everything is close by. 

Wrong place 

Football fans, don't go to New 
Orleans to see the Super Bowl this 
weekend like you read in this col- 
umn last week. Wrong place. Now 1 
know. The game will be in Atlanta. I 
apoligize for the goof. And this from 
an old sportswriter. Ouch. 

Speak Arabic 

Wonder if College of Lake Coun- 
ty will have a flood of applicants for 
a beginning course in Arabic start- 
ing Tuesday, Feb. 8? Sounds like a 
difficult language to learn. The four- 
hour credit course offers training in 
listening, speaking, writing and 
reading the Qur* an Hadith. The CLC 
Humanities Division at 847-543- 
2040 can provide further informa- 
tion. 

Backing Kirk 

Some of Lake County's most no- 
table Republicans are serving as 
honorary chairs of a fund raiser 
Thursday, Feb. 3, for Mark Steven 
Kirk, who is seeking a nomination 
for Congress in the March 21 prima- 
ry. Backing the 6 to 8 p.m. event at 
Deerpath Inn, Lake Forest, are 
Robert D. Stuart, former GOP state 
central committeeman; two former 
state representatives, Virginia Fred- 



erick and Betty Lou Reed, and 
Kathryn Porter, wife of retiring Con- 
gressman John Porter. Kirk served as 
Porter's chief of staff in Washington 
for 10 years. 

A mid-January poll conducted 
by one of the candidates had Kirk in 
third place, running behind social 
and economic conservative John 
Cox and Highland Park business- 
man Andrew Hochberg, who has 
been spending freely on TV since 
the holidays, in first place.- None of 
the candidates in the poll was any- 
where near double digits, meaning 
there's a long way to go for everyone. 

German visitors 

A special committee of the Lake 
Zurich Chamber of Commerce Is 
gearing up for entertaining a group 
this summer from Nittenau, Ger- 
many, Lake Zurich's sister city. The 
unique relationship was established 
last summer by Art Ladenburger, a 
school teacher, when he took stu- 
dents at Middle School North to 
Germany. Lake Zurich Mayor Jim 
Krischke and his wife, Beth, have 
signed up for the Sister City Com- 
mittee. Events honoring the visitors 
include a Labor Day weekend com- 
munity picnic. 

Seeking women 

The YWCA of Lake County is 
looking for nominations for its an- 
nua] Women of Achievement 
Awards benefit. The YW honors 
women in arts, business, public ser- 
vice, volunteering, education, entre- 
preneurship, professions and racial 
justice. Darlenc Montano can sup- 
ply nominating forms by calling 
847-662-4247. Winners will be an- 
nounced Friday, May 12, at a dinner 
at Marriott Lincolnshire Resort. 

More politics 

Early polling data supplied this 
column reveals Sen. John McCain 
showing surprising strength in Lake 
County. He's still running behind 
Gov. George W. Bush, though. Six 
hundred Republicans eligible to 
vote in March were polled. Democ- 
ratic sources say the local picture is 
pretty even between Vice President 
Gore and former Sen. Bill Bradley. 
Wouldn't it be fun if Illinois had an 
early primary like New Hampshire? 






For highlights of Illinois and services contact the State 

of Illinois new home page website address: 

www.state.il.us 



January 28, 2000 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C5 






q 



PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELANDNEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION, 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS! 




a test for Neal 



Prominent Republican Bob 
Neal will be testing himself 
at the same time he works 
to advance the campaign of 
Mark S. Klric, one of 12 candidates 
seeking the GOP nomination for 
Congress from the 10th District. . 

Fifteen years ago, Neal's sup- 
port alone might have been enough 
to put Kirk oyer the top in the North 
Shore district split almost evenly be- 
tween voters in Lake and Cook 
counties. That was when Neal was 
the dashing chairman of the Lake 
County Central Republican commit- 
tee, a post he held from 1982 to 
1990. 

Today, Neal is out of elective 
politics and holding down a state 
job.TheWadsworth resident, who 
last served as a Lake County Board 
member before an unsuccessful bid 
for County Recorder of Deeds, now. 
Is president of the 8th Congressional 
District Republican Club, a support 
group for Congressman Phil Crane 
(R-Illinois). 

Neal's backing of Kirk involves 
their mutual interest in the Navy Re- 
serve (Kirk is still active and Neal is 
retired) and hands-on experience 
with candidate Kirk when he served 
as chief of staff to U.S. Rep. John 
Porter, whom he is trying to suc- 
ceed. 

Neal was the first Lake County 
GOP notable to announce support 
for Kirk, 40, who has 15 years in 
public service with active military 
service including duty in Desert 
Storm: Kirk has a law degrees ;■ 

Gun confusion 

Northbrook Mayor Mark 
Damisch, one of 12 candidates for 
the Republican nomination for Con- 
gress from the 10th District, has cre- 
ated confusion among voters inter- 
ested in gun control. In the past he 
has supported banning handgun 
sales, but when the question came 
before the village council about a 
referendum on banning hand gun' 
ownership, he backed away, saying, 
"I do think that a person has a right 




Neal; Back into 
politics; kind of. 




Doras: Part of the 
"blue flu" crew on 
Grayslake village 
board. 

to possess a gun in their own home." 
Northbrook officials will discuss a 
referendum again in July. 

Quiet time 

At least for the present, Repub- 
lican party in-fighting in An tiochis a' 
thing of the past. Township GOP 
Chair Lillian Golonka expects a 
quiet primary election. She said 
there will be no competition for 
precinct committee posts. Only two 
precinct posts are open and these 
will be filled after the primary March 
21 through appointment 

Porter program 

Congressman John Porter (R- 

10th, Illinois) will be in Arlington 

Heights, Saturday, Jan. 29, for his 

| first public forum of the year from 



10 a.m. to noon at Olive School, 303 
E Olive St 

Geary remembered 

At this point, Norman Geary, 

former Lake County Board chair- 
man and long-time Avon Township 
supervisor, is only smiling at conver- 
sation circulating in Antioch about 
"Geary for Mayor in 2001." Retired 
from politics for nearly a decade, 
Geary is leading a petition drive to 
put a $5 million sewer expansion 
program on the March 1 1 ballot 

Challenge booted 

Supporters of Mark Rlef en- 
berg running for a General Assem- 
bly nomination in the March 21 pri- 
mary said State Rep. Sidney Math- 
las (R-Buffalo Grove) was playing 
"lawyer games" when a friend chal- 
lenged the Harrington financial con- 
sultant's petitions. State electoral 
board officials in Springfield gave 
hardly a second glance to the chal- 
lenge Mathias is running for a sec- 
ond term to represent a district bi- 
secting Lake and Cook counties. The 
Lake County side includes Lake 
Zurich, Long Grove, parts of 
Mundelein and Vernon Hills, 
Hawthorn Woods; Kildeer and Deer 
Park, plus Mathias' hometown. 

Blue flu virus 

Political "blue flu " a malady 
suffered years ago by Chicago po- 
licemen who reported absent during 
disputes, still lingers. Dissident 
Grayslake village trustees Cheryl 
Doros, Stacy Bravennan and 
John MacAuloy all were accused of 
the virus when not attending a re- 
cent council meeting. 

Curbing the calls 

State Sen. Terry Link (D-Ver- 
non Hills) says he has a bill that will 
untangle the hodgepodge way eel- ■ 
lular towers are sited. The proposed 
legislation would require that tele- 
com companies minimize the num- 
ber of towers located in and around 
communities. 




The Antioch High School 
football coach (a man right 
out of central casting) was 
walking after a game from 
the field to the locker room. A little 
girl in the accompanying crowd 
drifted a few steps away from her 
parents and beamed up at the 
coach. 

He winked at her and said, "Hey, 
did you pay to get in?" 

That's one of the memorable 
moments with Coach Roy Nelson 
that 111 never forget Lots of folks, 
were sharing memories of Roy last 
week. He passed away at 77 and 
hundreds paid their respects at the 
funeral home. 

Twenty-two years after he re- 
tired from coaching he remained a 
town treasure. In last week's Antioch 
News, in an article titled, "Smiles, 
accolades abound in remembrance 
of 'Coach,'" Community Editor 
Michael H. Babicz wrote: 
. "Heck of a role model." "True 
gentleman." "Real class act" 

"These were statements by 
some of the many people in the An- 
tioch community who were touched 
by Coach Roy Nelson." 

Said Roy's successor, Coach 
Steve Wapon: "He had a tremendous 
influence on my life. There's not a 
finer person I've known who was 
better at teaching what is important 
in life, being a competitor and still 
not losing track of what is key. 
Everyone lost a tremendous person 
and friend." 

Roy's son Rick and State Rep. 
Tim Osmond, who played basket- 
ball, golf and football on teams Nel- 
son coached; presented touching 
eulogies at the service. 

They praised Roy's subtle and 
sharp sense of humor and his ad- 
herence to total fairness. 

Tim mentioned he had saved 
the article I wrote In 1977 upon Roy's 
retirement from coaching; 

I said back then that after many 
years of covering sports I had dealt 




THE 



CORNER 

JerryPfarr 



with a lot of football coaches but 
never with a finer gentleman than 
Roy Nelson. 

As a young man, before he came 
to Antioch, Roy coached at Mendon, 
M., population 1,000 maybe. "Thafs 
where I learned the business " he 
said. a I was head coach hi basket- 
ball, football and track, drove the 
school bus, chaperoned the dances, 
swept out the gym and went to 
church every Sunday." . 

Upon retiring as football coach 
in Antioch he told the school board 
that some of his strongest competi- 
tion was coming from General Mo- 
tors, Pabst Blue Ribbon and Salem 
cigarettes in making mature athletes 
and young men of his players. 

Antioch school officials included 
that statement in a press release 
about his resignation. Some other 
schools might have swept that kettle 
of fish under the rug, but Antioch re- 
spected anything Roy Nelson had to 
say. 

"The vocabulary was kind of 
rough, too," Roy said, "and we've 
cleaned that up, even though we're 
fighting against television now. I 
hope if they say anything about Roy 
Nelson it will be that he tried to 
teach a little more than punt, pass 
and kick out there. And maybe the 
players learned something that will 
make them better citizens." 

Today, as people drive into Anti- 
och on Rte. 173, they pass a football 
field and sports complex. A sign 
says, "Antioch Community High 
School, Home of the Sequofts." 

I think a new sign should say, 
"Roy Nelson Field." 



Guest commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes guest columns by our readers on top- 
ics of general Interest. Anyone interested In writing a column can contact 
Publisher W.H. Schroeder at (847) 223-8161 . Submissions may be mailed 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake IL, 60030 or fax to 
(847) 223-8810. Deadline is Friday at noon. 



FROM PAGE C4 



HOME RULE 



to the voters and pass a home rule 
referendum and you can solve all of 
those problems on your own. He 
was probably "tweaking" them, be- 
cause I know that Bill has enough 
political savvy to know that a home 
rule referendum would fail. 

It was also said that the County, 
if it went to home rule, would have 
absolute powers In some of these 
touchy issues relating to siting of 
peaker plants and cellular towers. 
My take is a little different I believe 
that there are many unanswered 
questions regarding the new "phe- 
nomenon" called peaker plants that 
it should be a statewide issue with 
regulatory powers in the state. That 
is why I believe that de-regulation of 
the public utilities was not in the 
best Interests of the people. 

' When the Issue of going to an 
elected County Board chairman was 
raised, I said that it was dangerous 
to put too much power in one per- 
son. Also, when Lake County voters 
turned down that option years ago; 
the idea was bankrolled primarily 
by the pro-growth developers. It is 
ironic As I write this column, I have 
just read that the Will County elect- 
ed executive is being investigated 
over a $10 million tax break given to 



a racetrack developer there. It's al- 
ways best to defuse power. 

Just as it Is dangerous to put too 
much power in one person as the 
head of the county, it is dangerous to 
put more power to tax in a county . 
board. The "two-tiered" approach 
which provides that the legislature 
first enact the authority "downward" 
to local government, is a safeguard 
that the taxpayers deserva Legisla- 
tors "take the heat" all of the time; 
that Is why "they are in the kitchen." 

When I oppose allowing the 
County Board to be a home rule 
unit of government, it is not a reflec- 
tion of the present County Board, or 
the leadership of iL It is just that I 
have never been fan of "home rule 
powers" in any unit of government. 
When the constitutional convention 
was debating the issue, I believed 
that they were taking away power 
from the people, and I still hold, to 
that position. 

Will the home rule issue "get off 
the ground?" I beiieve that a majori- 
ty of the County Board are realists 
and aware that the voters "have no 
stomach" for it. So, it will have the 
same fate as "the elected County 
Board chairman." IT WILL BE SHpT 
DOWN— and rightly so. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Kudos to a politician with principle 



In a recent issue, there was a 
letter to the editor by a Mr. 
Guenther regarding the 
"Neighborhood Protection 
Act" With due respect for my fellow 
citizen, and respect for his rights 
protected by the First Amendment, 
I feel that he has not done his 
homework, but that Guenther has 
written from his emotion. I remem- 
ber Senator Geo-Karis' actions in a 
different way then Guenther. 

I never remember the Senator 
supporting a Democrat over a Re- 
publican. I find it refreshing, in this 
time of public opinion polls, and 
elected officials who sway with the 
wind, to find a public servant who 
will stand for a principle. I believe 
that the Senator deserves credit for 
her current stand as well as her past 
record of service. I am pleased that 
a public official Is considering the 



rights of citizens. The issue here is 
not one of public safety, but rather 
understanding a very old principle 
of the law, that of intent Intent is 
the difference between murder and 
self defense, the result is the same, 
but the reason is different 

Would we charge a police offi- 
cer with murder for stopping a 
crime in progress? Perhaps some 
people do not realize that under the 
proposed law, you may not be able 
to buy a gun and take it home, 
many current vehicles could not 
legally transport any firearm. Sta- 
tion wagons, vans, hatchbacks, and 
SUVs, have no place to store a 
firearm that would not allow a per- 
son to access it without exiting the 
vehicle. Some local areas require a 
firearm to be disassembled, a job 
beyond some owners. A felony con- 
viction costs loss of civil rights for 



the person convicted. This is a high 
price to pay for an error in judg- 
ment We should guard our civil 
rights carefully. Mandated penalties 
for minor infractions can lead to 
abuse. Did you know Chicago alder- 
men can cany concealed weapons? 
Is that a double standard? 

I applaud our senator for hav- 
ing the courage to look at both sides 
of an Issue, and take a stand for a 
honorable principle of the law. It is 
already a felony to commit a crime 
with any weapon. It is already a 
felony for anyone convicted of a 
felony to possess, or attempt to pos- 
sess a firearm. If we enforce the cur- 
rent law, we will have to build more 
prisons. Thank you Senator Geo- 
Karis for remembering that we 
must live under the laws you pass. 
Charles Nystrom 
Waukegan 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcomed They should be on topics of general Interest, approximately 

250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and contain a home address and telephone 

number. The editor reserves the right to condense all letters. 






C6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 28, 2000 



Geo Raris: cited as 

legislator 




State Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis was 
named 1999 Outstanding Humane 
Legislator on Jan. 19 in Springfield by 
Illinois Humane because of her com- 
mitment to encouraging the ethical 
treatment of animals. 

Geo-Karis sponsored a bill which 
would increase the criminal penal- 
ties for abusing companion pets, and 
a bill which would give school chil- 
dren the option to forgo dissecting 
animals in their classes. 

"We take many animals into our 
homes to be our companions," said 
Geo-Karis (R-Zion). "We cannot let 
people hurt them. It is unethical and 
undignified. I am pleased to accept 
this award from Illinois Humane be- 
cause I feel that there are actions we 
can take to protect animals." 

Executive Director of the Illinois 
Humane Don Rolla, and Co-chair 
Steven Gross, presented Sen. Geo- 



Karis with a plaque as they thanked 
her for her contributions to helping 
to stop cruelty to animals. 

Geo-Karis sponsored House Bill 
810 which increases the penalty for a 
second or subsequent offense of ag- 
gravated cruelty to a companion an- 
imal from a Class A misdemeanor to 
a Class 4 felony. 

Research has found a connec- 
tion between the torture of animals 
and other criminal deviant conduct. 
"If we can stop people from abusing 
their animals, there is a hope that we 
can prevent them from hurting oth- 
er people," said Geo-Karis. 

Before HB810 became law, if 
someone intentionally committed 
an act that caused a companion an- 
imal to suffer serious injury or death 
it was a Class A misdemeanor. The 
new law punishes someone who 
commits a second Class 4 felony. 



CRIMESTOPPERS 



January is crime stoppers 




By SANDY HARTOGH 
Staff Reporter 



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With the start of the new millen- 
nium and the close of the 20th cen- 
tury, Illinois Governor George Ryan 
and Secretary of State Jesse White re- 
cently proclaimed January 2000 as 
"Crime Stoppers Month" in Lake 
County. 

Andy Anderson, who is executive 
director of the Lake County program, 
initiated the proclamation. He noted 
that this is "a first" in the history of 
the community program, which is 
comprised of concerned citizens 
who work closely with police author- 
ities, news media and the public in 
the fight against crime. 

"I'm trying to get the program 
into full bloom," said Anderson at his 
Grayslake Police Station headquar- 
ters. "We need to get people more in- 
volved with Crime Stoppers." 

Crime Stoppers of Lake County, 
which is part of a world-wide organi- 
zation developed in 1976, is a non- 
profit group that is funded primari- 
ly by private donations of money, 
goods or services from the private, 
public and business sectors of the 
community. 

Crime Stoppers offers cash re- 
wards of up to $1,000, plus anonymi- 
ty to any citizen who furnishes infor- 
mation leading to the arrest of felony 
fugitives, said Anderson. Additional 
rewards are paid for court testimony 
if the person is willing to testify, and 
the State's Attorney Office thinks the 
testimony is needed. 

According to the proclamation, 
Lake County Crime Stoppers has led 
to more than 3,000 arrests and con- 
victions for recovery of stolen prop- 
erty and illicit narcotics since its in- 
ception in 1983. 



The program is also responsible 
for leading law enforcement officers 
to more than $10 million in contra- 
band and recovered stolen property 
throughout Lake County, Northern 
Illinois and Wisconsin. 

Gun Stoppers, another "teg" of 
Crime Stoppers, was also included in 
the proclamation. The program's 
purpose is to remove illegal guns 
from public places such as schools, 
school buses and playgrounds. 

"Gun Stoppers managed to get 
42 guns off of our streets in 1999 
alone," commented Anderson, who 
noted that this program is unique to 
Lake County. 



Anderson, who took oyer the 
Crime Stoppers program in July 
1999, said he was thrilled with the 
proclamation and hoped that it 
would heighten public awareness of 
the program^ He pointed out that 
the new millennium "will undoubt- 
edly bring many technological ad- 
vances" for Crime Stopper support- 
ers to conquer, and said that the or- 
ganization looks forward to meeting 
those challenges. 

For further information on the 
Lake County Crime Stoppers pro- 
gram, call 847-662-2222 between 8 
a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 






S 



f'.'W i «.>fi*u 



■J 



January 2000 has been declared by state leaders as Crime Stop- 
pers month. Andy Anderson, who is executive director of the Lake 
County program, initiated the proclamation. This is a first in the 
history of the community program, which is comprised of con- 
cerned citizens who work closely with police authorities, news me- 
dia and the public in the fight against crime. 



I 






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Words of Wisdom 
XXIY: The art of 
communication 

Wisdom is the reward you get 
for a lifetime of listening 
when you'd Itave preferred to talk. 
—DougLarsen 



I believe our success in life is de- 
termined to a great degree by 
our ability to communicate ef- 
fectively. The men and women 
who rise quickly to leadership posi- 
tions are those who can verbalize 
their ideas with passion, listen with 
both their eyes and their ears and 
think on their feet. 

I learned in my first Toastmas- 
ter's manual the value of building 
communication skills. The power 
and confidence that come from im- 
proving these skills is known only to 
those who risk appearing foolish in 
return for the reward. Communica- 
tion is neither art, nor gift, but 
rather a skill to develop. 

You've read my thoughts of 
building these skills before. Now let 
me share some power words of oth- 
ers whose lives were forever 
changed by their ability to convey 
thoughts and meanings to others! 

The Power of 
Communication 

I • The ability to speak is a short- 
-cut to distinction. It puts a man in 
the limelight, raises him head and 
shoulder above the crowd, and the 
man who can speak acceptably is 
usually given credit for an ability all 
out of proportion to what he really 
possesses. — Lowell Thomas- 

• All great speakers were bad 
speakers at first. — Ralph Waldo 
Emerson 

• Silence maybe misunder- 
stood, but never misquoted. — un- 
known 

• Let your discourse with men 
of business be short and compre- 
hensive. — George Washington 

• Talk low, talk slow, and don't 
say too much. —John Wayne 

• Hear the other side. — " St. Au- 
gustine 

• Wisdom is divided into two 
parts: (a) having a great deal to say, 
and (b) not saying it. —Anonymous 

• To listen well is as powerful a 
means of communication and in- 
fluence as to talk well. — Chief Jus- 
tice Jolm Marshall 

• A reporter, coming upon a big 
story, telegraphed his editor. The 
editor replied, "Send six hundred 
words." The reporter wired back, 
"Can't be told in less than twelve 
hundred words." The editor 
replied, "Story of creation of world 
told in six hundred. Try it." — un- 
known 

• A good llsteneris not only 
popular everywhere, but after a 
while he knows something.— Wil- 
son Mizner 

• I found out early in life you 
never have to explain something 
you haven't said. — Calvin Coolidge 

• What this country needs is 
more free speech worth listening to. 
— Hansell B. Duckett 

• Drawing on my fine com- 
mand of language, I say nothing. — 
Robert Charles Benchley 

• Speak clearly, if you speak at 
all; carve every word before you let 
it fall. — Oliver Wendell Holmes 

• Be silent always when you 
doubt your sense. — Alexander 
Page 

• When I'm getting ready to per- 
suade a man, I spend one third of 
time thinking about myself- what 

- I'm going to say - arid two thirds of 
. the time thinking about him and 

what he is going to say. — Abraham 

Lincoln 

Please see TAYLOR IC8 





January 28-February 3; 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers C7- 




Grand slam 

It was a grand slam for the An- 
tloch-area economy as Tour en- 
trepreneurs celebrated their 
grand openings during a round- 
robin event held at each of the 
businesses. Top photo, Ana 
Marie Houghton, Kitty Levas, 
Gina Yeko, Adam Carlson and 
Erin Carlson celebrate the 
grand opening of Mama Leva's 
Deli with Antioch village offi- 
cials including Claude LeMere, 
Mayor Marilyn Shineflug, Peter 
Lezeau, Dorothy Larson, Don 
Skidmore,- Alice Wegener, Lar- 
ry Hanson, Jim Meyer and 
Wayne Foresta. Top right pho- 
to, Scott and Ashley Eberle, 
center, celebrate the grand 
opening of their tanning salon, 
Northern Exposures, with offi- 
cials including, front row, from 
left, LeMere, and Foresta. Back 
row, from left; Hanson, Lezeau, 
Skidmore, Larson, Wegener 
and Meyer. Bottom right photo, 
Olivia Cano, 10, and Dolores 
Cano, center, celebrate the 
grand opening of Decano Cre- 
ations with Antioch officials in- 
cluding, front row, from left; 
LeMere, Shineflug and Fores- 
ta. Back row, from left; Wegen- 
er, Hanson, Larson, Meyer, 
Marv Oldenburger, Lezeau and 
Skidmore. Bottom photo, 
Joanne and Dave Hoeh cele- 
brate the opening of Antioch 
Floral with, front row, from left; 
LeMere, Wegener, Mayor 
Shineflug and Foresta. Back 
row,, from left; Oldenburger, 
Skidmore, Lezeau, Meyer and 
Larson. — Photos by Sandy 
Bressner 






sees 



earnings 




Firm closes one 
branch, agrees 
to sell another 

Success Bancshares Inc., the 
holding company for Success Na- 
tional Bank, announced that net in- 
come for the year ended Dec. 31 was 
S1.7 million or $0.60 per diluted 
share, an increase of $524,000 or 43.5 
percent over net income of $1.2 mil- 
lion or $0.40 per diluted share for 
1998. 

For the quarter ended Dec. 31, 
net income was $429 thousand or 
$0.15 per diluted share, an increase 
of $172 thousand or 66.9 percent 
over net income of $257 thousand or 
$0.08 per diluted share for the com- 
parable period in 1998. 

The company also announced 
that it closed its Chicago Loop 
branch in late Dec. and entered into 
an agreement to sell its Arlington 
Heights branch property. Both 
branches, which were open for less 
than 31 months each, were unable to 
secure enough business to warrant 
their continued operation. The lease 
on the company's Deerfield/River- 
woods branch, which space was 
used primarily for loan origination 
and processing, was not renewed in 
Oct. Employees from that branch 
were moved to the newly leased cor- 
porate center, bringing the number 
of headquarters employees to 115. 

The company said it has contin- 
ued to experience growth in its mar- 
ket area. Total assets were $497.1 
million at Dec 31, as compared with 
$470.5 million at the end of 1998, an 
increase of $26.7 million or 5.7 per- 
cent. Loans increased $53.9 million 
or 14.4 percent during the year. 

Although deposits at Dec. 31 de- 
Please see SUCCESS ICQ 



Diversity to 
be explored 
at breakfast 



Recent U.S. Government fore- 
casts indicate the nation's population 
will double in the next century, with 
the fastest growing segments con- 
centrated in groups currently listed 
as minorities. The Lake County Pow- 
er Breakfast will explore how local 
businesses and government agencies 
are preparing for these changes by 
taking a closer look at Diversity in 
Business. Moderator Hal Coxon wel- 
come Susana Figueroa, Community 
Liaison for the City of Waukegan, 
Lake CountyBoard Commissioner 
Angelo Kyle (12th District) and Elroy 
Reed, publisher and editor of The 
Peoples Voice, Lake County's 
Africaij-American newspaper. 

"While It's easy to focus on the 
challenges this may bring, successful 
companies throughout the world 
have capitalized on the opportuni- 
ties presented through increased di- 
versity," according to Lenny Khayat 

Please see BREAKFAST IC8 



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C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



January 28, 2.0QQ 




Winners 

Bob Schroeder announces the 
prize as Linda Shipman draws 
the winner's name at a "Lake- 
land Publisher's Extravaganza" 
sponsored by Lakeland Pub- 
lishers at the Gurnee Holiday 
Inn. At right, Mark Abernathy 
holds Casey Quinn, 13 months, 
as they show Dawn Abernathy 
a certificate Mark won for the 
Village Pub in Antioch. — Photo 
by Lynn Gunnarson Dahlstrom 




Abbott reports increased 
sales, earnings during '99 



Abbot Laboratories has reported 
an increase in sales and earnings for 
both the quarter and year ended 
Dec. 31. Worldwide sales for the 
fourth quarter were $3,468 billion, up 
3.8 percent from $3,342 billion in the 
fourth quarter of 1998. 

Total sales were unfavorably im- 
pacted 1.4 percent due to the effect 
of the relatively stronger U.S. dollar. 
Without the impact of exchange, to- 
tal sales in the fourth quarter would 
have increased 5.2 percent. 

Sales for TAP Holdings Inc., Ab- 
bott's joint venture with Takeda 
Chemical Industries Ltd., were $808 
million in the fourth quarter, up 38. 1 
percent from $585 million in the 
fourth quarter of 1 998. 

Diluted earnings per share for 
the quarter rose to 43 cents, up 7.5 
percent for 40 cents a year ago. Net 
earnings were $664 million, up 5.7 



percent from the fourth quarter of 
1998. 

Pharmaceutical products seg- 
ment sales were $665 million in the 
fourth quarter, a 4.3 percent de- 
crease from 695 million in the fourth 
quarter of 1998. 

Chemical and agricultural prod- 
ucts segment sales were $89 million 
in the fourth quarter of each year. 

Total sales in U.S. markets were 
$2,105 billion, up 3.4 percent from 
the fourth quarter of 1998. Total in- 
ternational sales, including direct ex- 
ports form the United States, were 
$1,363 billion, up 4.3 percent form 
the same period a year earlier, and 
were unfavorably impacted 3.5 per- 
cent due to the effect of the relative- 
ly stronger U.S. dollar. Without the 
impact of exchange, international 
sales would have increased 7.8 per- 
cent. 



Free Seminar: How Small 

Businesses Can Use the 

Internet to Survive & Thrive 



Thursday, February 3, 2000, 7 p.m. 
Holiday Inn - Gurnee 

6161 W. Grand Avenue, Gurnee, IL 

1-294 (Tri-State Tollway) & Hwy 132 (Next to Gurnee Mills Mall) 

Call for reservations (262) 694-7303 



► L,earn how to cost-effectively set up a Web store to sell goods 

and services over the Internet. 

► Learn how to save money buying over the Internet. 

► Learn how to use e-commerce to survive & thrive in the future. 



ON THE MOVE 



Akbar "Tain" Tamhidl has 

been named Vice President of Oper- 
ational Planning & Control for Out- 
board Marine Corporation's North 
American Engine Operations 
(NAEO) by Bob Gowens, President 
of OMC/NAEO. Tamhidi will over- 
see both strategic and tactical initia- 
tives relating to North American En- 
gine, operations. Tamhidi will also 
lead NAEO's implementation of de- 
mand flow and shop floor control 
programs at NAEO operational 
units, as well as, provide leadership 
for the conversion of NAEO's opera- 
tional systems onto OMC's JD Ed- 
wards Enterprise solution. 

David Gray has joined Ameri- 
graphx Marketing Communications 
as an Account Supervisor in the Pre- 
mium Divi- 
sion. For- • 
mally with 
TLK Market- 
ing, Gray's 
responsi- 
bilites will 
inculde ac- 
count man- 
age men t 
and new 
business de- 




Presented by: 

Midwest E- Commerce llc 

262-694-7303 
John Stampfl, President 

Microsoft Certified Systems 

Engineer + Internet. 

Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer. 

Former Chief Financial Officer 

of Advantage Bank. 







David Gray 

velopment at Amerigraphx. 



Kristin L. Dvorsky Taurus, 

Lake Zurich, an associate at the 
Chicago law firm of McKenna, Stor- 
er, Rowe, White & Faring, is the co- 
author of an article, "Product Liabil- 
ity and Embedded Microprocessors: 
The Other Y2K Problem," with 
Richard J. Rettberg, which appears 
in the Dec. issue of the Illinois Bar 
Journal. In the article, Dvorsky 
Tauras and Rettberg offer possible 
defenses and theories for manufac- 
tures and sellers of products with 
embedded microprocessors. 



BUSINESS DIGEST 



Chamber marks millennium with awards 

The Greater Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce has chosen it's New Of- 
ficers Installation Dinner at the Cucina Roma in Lincolnshireto inaugurate 
its First Annual Distinguished Business Awards. Nominations by chamber 
members have been taking place since Nov. and the winners in four business 
categories will be announced at the Jan. 20 dinner. An evening of diningand 
entertainment has been panned featuring Magician Dave and the installation 
of the chamber's year 2000 officers. The festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. and the 
cost is only $45. Please contact Pat Wilder at the chamber office for more in- 
formation 793-2409. 

Ryan to keynote GLMV chamber event 

Illinois Gov. George H. Ryan will be the keynote speaker at the GLMV 
Chamber of Commerce's Annual Installation Dinner. The dinner will be held 
on Feb. 3, at the Holiday Inn located in Mundelein. Reservations are S400 for 
a table of eight or $50 per person. Please pay in advance or at the door. RSVP 
to GLMV Chamber of Commerce no later than noon Jan. 31 by calling 680- 
0750 or fax 680-0760. 

Amerigraphx completes expansion 

Amerigraphx Marketing Communications has just completed the expan- 
sion of its offices located in Liberlyvillc. The company added and reconfig- 
ured over 10,000 square feet to accommodate the July acquisition of Diversi- 
fied Merchandising Inc. of Skokie. 

CASA opens office, keeps Depke space 

The Court Appointed Special Advocate Association in Lake County, CASA, 
has taken space in a private office building while maintaining its small un- 
dersized headquarters in the Robert Depke Juvenile Justice Center in Vernon 
Hills. Susan Grant, executive director for the Lake County CASA, said 1.260- 
square-feet of space was leased at 1020 Milwaukee Ave., Deerficld. She said 
the added space is desperately needed to help the organization serve 850 chil- 
dren in Lake County who have or need adult advocates to represent them in 
trying to successfully build their lives. 

Man OK on Y2K because of promotion 

Cuberto S. Mendoza of North Chicago has won a brand new Y2K-com- 
pliant computer in Waukegan Savings and Loan's "OK on Y2K" promotion. 
Mendoza'a name was drawn from those who opened a new totally free check- 
ing account at the historic thrift between Nov. 1 and Dec. 20. The promotion 
was designed to reinforce the bank's Y2K readiness for both new and existing 
customers. 

Transfer declaration available online 

Mary Ellen Vanderventer, Lake County Recorder, has announced the 
availability of the revised Illinois Real Estate Transfer Declaration on the Lake 
Co. Recorder's web site at www.co.lakc.il.us/recorder. The form is available 
for downloading. For information on the forms available on the web site or 
anything related to the Recorder's Office, call 360-6673. ' 



FROM PAGE C7 



SUCCESS 



creased $4.4 million, or 1.1 percent 
to,$394.3 million over the amount 
rellccled at year-end 1998, advances 
from the Federal Home Loan Bank 
of Chicago increased $30.5 million 
to $45.9 million at Dec. 31, as com- 
pared to $15.5 million at Dec. 31. 

The company's shareholders' 
equity and book value per common 
share were $30.9 million and $1 1.34, 
respectively, at Dec. 31, as com- 
pared with $32.3 million and $10.92 
at the end of 1998. During 1999, the 
company purchased 177,690 shares 
of its common stock on the open 



market at a cost of $1.9 million as 
part of its 1999 Stock Repurchase 
Program. In addition, the company 
purchased 170,129 sharesof its com- 
mon stock at a cost of $1.7 million 
from the estate of the company's for- 
mer president. All shares are trans- 
ferred Success's treasury stock ac- 
count for issuance in connection 
with the exercise of stock options, 
the company's Employee Stock Pur- 
chase Program and other purposes. 
As of Dec. 31, 5,683 common 
shares had been issued from the 
treasury account in connection with 



the company's Employee Stock Pur- 
chase Program. On Jan. 1 2, the com- 
pany's Board of Directors approved 
a 2000 Stock.Repurchase Program, 
enabling the Success to purchase up 
to an additional $2 million of the 
company's common stock. 

Success Bancshares Inc., in ad- 
dition to its corporate offices, pro- 
vides community banking services 
through nine locations to individuals 
and small-to-medium sized busi- 
nesses primarily in the north and 
northwest suburbs of Chicago and 
the north side of Chicago. 



BREAKFAST 



of Midland Golf Resort.' "Susana 
Figueroa, Angelo Kyle and Elroy 
Reed will bring their insight re- 
garding some of these successes. 
They'll also provide a candid look 
at how businesses and govern- 
mental agencies in Lake County 
are faring when it comes to em- 
bracing diversity." . 



TAYLOR 



• One must be a wise reader to 
quote wisely and well. — Amos B. 
Alcott 

• Truth never hurts the teller. — 
Robert Browning 

• Being a better communicator 
means being a better understander. 
— PaulR.Timm 

• Many people would be more 
truthful were it not for their uncon- 
trollable desire to talk. — Edgar 
Watson Howe 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
Up Against the Wal-Marts, You 
may write to him in care of Mind- 
ing Your Own Business, PO Box 
67, Amarillo,TX 79105. 



As the Community Liaison for 
the city of Waukegan, Susana 
Figuera serves as a link between the 
local government, Waukegan resi- 
dents and all public agencies. She is 
responsible for programs siich as 
proactive community education and 
crime prevention for various city de- 
partments. Born in Mexico, Susana 
moved to the United States in 1986. 
She earned a bachelors degree in 
Business (Lake Forest College, 1992) 
and previously worked in the private 
sector as an Account Representative 
for the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
in Rosemont. 

Angelo Kyle was elected to the 
Lake County Board in 1990. He 
currently serves as Community 
and Economic Development 
Committee Chairman and is a 
member of the Finance and Leg- 
islative Committees. Throughout 
his County Board tenure, Kyle has 
also received a bachelor's degree 
in Political Science in 1996. Kyle 
runs TempTech, Inc., a private 
company. He is former Presi- 
dent/CEO of the Lake County Ur- 
ban League (1992-1996). 

Elroy Reed was instrumental in 
the start of The People's Voice in 



1996, a newspaper focused on the 
Lake County African American com- 
munity. Reed is now responsible for 
publishing the monthly papers and 
helped create the annual Lake Coun- 
ty's Outstanding African American 
banquet, founded to recognize 
achievement in and by the local 
African American community. Reed 
earned a master's degree in Business 
Administration from Lake Forest 
Graduate School of Management in 
2998 and also received degrees from 
Webster University in St. Louis {MA, 
Marketing) and the University of 
Arkansas (BS, Industrial Engineer- 
ing). 

The Lake County Power Break- 
fast is open to the public the first 
Wednesday of each month begin- 
ning at 7:30 a.m. at Midlane Golf Re- 
sort, which sponsors the program 
along with the Daily Herald, AT&T 
Cable Services, WKRS/WXLC Radio, 
Contcmpo Design and the Lake 
County Chamber of Commerce. 
AT&T Cable Services will broadcast 
the Power Breakfast at 7 p.m. Mon- 
day and Wednesday evenings on the 
Star Channel beginning Feb. 7. For 
reservations, contact Midlane Golf 
Resort at 360-0550. 



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January 28, 2000 



BUSINESS 



_ 1 






2p00from 

CENTER 

(847)223-7878 

Our agents have assisted over 600 families in their home buying and selling in the Lake County area with 

sales volume in excess of $111,000,000. Thank you for making Re/Max #1 in Grayslake again this year. 

May all our present, past and future clients have a very prosperous New Year! 




Lakeland Newspapers / C9 




arvommrr 



m 




RF/MBK CENTER is a 

proud sponsor of 

Children's Miracle Network, 

associated with Children's 

Memorial Hospital. All our 

agents donate a portion of 

their commission. 



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PERCENT OF MAflKCT 



NOTE: This representation is based In whole or in part on data 
supplied by the Multiple Listing Service of Northern Illinois. The 
MLSNI neither guarantees nor is In any way responsible for its 
accuracy. Data maintained by the MLSNI may not reflect all real 
estate activity in the market 

Each RE^MKK office is independently owned and operated. 





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KE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 

Ear cleaning clinic 
for seniors 

Do you have decreased hear- 
ing, ear discomfort or a foreign 
body sensation in your ears? 
Nancy Wilens, RN, will assess 
your ears and clean them, if nec- 
essary. Call 535-8400. Date: 3rd 
Tuesday of every month. Time: 1 
to 4p.m. 

New! Foot care clinic for 
seniors 

Nancy Wilens RN, GNP, will 
provide you with a foot assess- 
ment and trim those hard to 
maintain nails for $10. Call 
535-8400. Date 2nd Tuesday of 
every month. Time: 1 to 4 p.m. 

Blood pressure screenings 

Have your blood pressure done 
and evaluated by Nancy Wilens, 
RN, GNP. Call 847-535-8400. 
Date: Wednesdays in February. 
Time: 1 to 3 p.m. 

VICTORY 
MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL ' 

Learning how volunteering 
can improve your life 

Volunteers help many people 
in our community. They help the 
elderly, the sick, the needy. What 
we often forget is that volunteers 
also help themselves. Volunteer- 
ing provides a sense of purpose 
and fulfillment. It allows people 
to reach out to others, make new 
friends. It lets individuals share 
their skills, knowledge and re- 
sources while they learn new 
things in return. Statistics show 
that people who volunteer are 
healthier, happier and less 
stressed than those who do not. 
The Victory Community Elder- 
CARE program will begin its free 
2000 community education se- 
ries, "Issues on Aging", at 7 p.m. 
on Monday, January 31, in the 
Great Room at the Independent 
Living Center, Village at Victory 
Lakes, Grand Avenue, Linden- 
hurst. The first seminar, "Im- 
prove your Health and Well- 
ness: Volunteer!," will discuss 
the value of volunteering and 
ways to become involved. To 
register for this seminar, call 
360-4004, between 8 a.m. and 4 
p.m., Monday through Friday. 

LAKE COUNTY 
HEALTH 

DEPARTMENT AND 
COMMUNITY 
HEALTH CENTER 

Nutritional counseling 
offered 

A registered dietian is available 
from the Lake County Health De- 
partment and Community 
Health Center for consultation to 
eligible Lake County residents. A 
physician referral is required for 
special diet instructions. We are 
unable to take appointments 
without this referral. Indivduals 
may make appointments for the 
following location: Lake County 
Health Department and Com- 
munity Health Center, 3010 
Grand Avenue, 'Waukegan. The 
dietitian is also available for 
group presentations on nutrition 
topics. Please call 360-6753 for 
information. 

Home health care available 

Lake County Health Depart- 
ment and Community Health 
Center's Home Health Care Ser- 
vices provides nurses; physical, 
speech and occupational thera- 
pists; a nutritionist; .aides and a 
social worker on a part-time 
basis to homebound Lake 
County residents under the 
care or a physician. Fees are 
paid by Medicare, Medicaid 
and private insurance. If none 
of these are available, fees are 
based on a client's ability to 
pay, with no one refused ser- 
vices due to an inability to pay. 
For more information on how 
you can obtain this part-time 
health care at home, please call 
360-6717. 




C 1 / Lakeland Newspapers 



January 28,-2000 



Where to find free information on low back pain treatments 



It's a scenario that hits close to 
home for more than 80 percent of 
Americans, One day, without any 
warning, low back pain strikes. 
And when it strikes, there's only 
one thing nearly as important as 
finding relief: Finding information. 
For the estimated 20 million 
Americans who suffer from low 
back pain at any given time, find- 
ing medically sound and easily 
comprehensible information is 
not only a top priority, but also an 
ongoing challenge. Fortunately, a 
wealth of information exists - if 
you know where to look. 

"There are a number of 
sources for reliable low back pain 
informatiqn," said Dr. John Sher- 
man, a Minneapolis-based ortho- 
pedic spinal surgeon. "Informa- 
tion is important because back 
pain can be especially frightening 
for people. It can be extremely 
painful and its cause can be very 
hard to explain, leading people to 
think the worst. And while most 
cases o f back pain arc not a sign of 



a serious medical problem, people 
don't know that." 

Back pain affects more than 80 
percent of Americans sometime in 
their life. The leading cause of dis- 
ability among people ages 19 to 45, 
low back pain treatments cost 
Americans $60 billion a year and is 
estimated to be the cause of 150 
million missed workdays. These 
missed man-hours translate to $15 
billion in lost productivity. 

The sheer number of cases 
and diversity of treatments avail- 
able for low back pain make infor- 
mation especially crucial. For ex- 
ample, Sherman said he pre- 
scribes treatments ranging from 
surgery and physical therapy to in- 
novative treatments such as the 
Orthotrac Pneumatic Vest, a new 
treatment that helps some pa- 
tients manage their pain by re- 
moving weight from the spine and 
placing it on the hips. Sherman 
said the variety of treatments 
available could lead uninformed 
patients to expect more than their 



condition requires. 

"When you are suffering from 
nagging pain, there's always the 
feeling that not enough is being 
done," Sherman says. "As doctors 
we learn to expect that. However, 
patients who understand the dif- 
ferences in treatments and the dif- 
ferent reasons for each treatment 
are more likely to spend the time 
they have with their doctor pro- 
ductively." 

The good news is that accord- 
ing to the Mayo Clinic, the 
Rochester, Minnesota-based hos- 
pital and medical school, 85 per- 
cent of low back pain cases go 
away within two weeks. However, 
because few patients recognize 
that fact, many go to the doctor for 
treatment when they should prob- 
ably just be patient. So how can 
people find the basic information 
they need to make informed deci- 
sions on whether or not to seek 
treatment? A number of free and 
easily accessible resources exist. 

One such resource is the Mayo 




There are a variety of remedies 
for lower back pain available 
on the Internet. 



Clinic's Web site Health Oasis. The 
site, www.mayohcalth.org, high- 
lights a wide variety of medical 
conditions, including back pain. 



Please see BACK. PAIN ICll 



2000 Chicago Auto Show Gala to raise $1 million 



Twelve Chicago area charities 
will benefit from more than $1 mil- 
lion expected to.be raised by a 
black-tie gala held in conjunction 
with the 2000 Chicago Auto Show 
in February. Now in its ninth year, 
First Look for Charity is held the 
evening before the auto show 
opens to the public. 

The coming "First Look" event, 
on Feb. 10, gives benefactors the 
chance to see nearly 1,000 new ve- 
hicles on display amid an elegance 
not present when more than 1 mil- 
lion people converge on Mc- 
Cormick Place during the auto 
show's 10-day consumer run, Feb. 
11-20. 

Benefactors also have the 
chance to win a just introduced 
2000 Chevrolet Suburban. Chevro- 
let Motor Division and 
Chicagoland Chevrolet dealers 
have donated the full-size sport 
utility vehicle, valued at more than 
$42,000. 

About 8,000 attendees at the 
charity gala will be treated to hors 
d'ocuvres; champagne, wine, beer 
and soft drinks; and the musical 
styling of Stanley Paul as they 
roam the expansive floor of Mc- 
Cormick Place South. The public 
phase of the auto show attracts an 
average 120,000 people a day. 

"The Chicago Auto Show is 
uniformly regarded as the finest 
auto show in the country, but the 



charitable cause demonstrates that 
this auto show is about more than 
just vehicles and accessories," 
show chairman Bill Stasek said. 
"It's also about giving something 
to the charities of our community." 

The 12 organizations partici- 
pating in this year's First Look 
for Charity predominantly arc 
children-oriented. Some operate 
on a global level; others, locally. 
The charities receive 100 percent 
of the proceeds from the event, 
and all those proceeds are used 
in their efforts in Chicagoland, 
Stasek said. 

Charities involved in the 9th 
annual First Look for Charity are: 
ALSAC/St. Jude Children's Re- 
search Hospital, Alzheimer's Asso- 
ciation, Boys & Girls Clubs of 
Chicago, children's Memorial Hos- 
pital, The Cradle, and Illinois Spina 
Bifida Association. 

Also, Little City Foundation, 
March of Dimes Birth Defects 
Foundation, Misericordia Heart of 
Mercy Center, National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society, Ray Graham As- 
sociation for People with Disabili- 
ties, and Ronald McDonald House 
Charities. 

Tickets to the event are $125 
each and can be ordered by calling 
630-424-1636. Benefactors should 
indicate which charity or charities 
they want their donation to bene- 
fit. Of each ticket, $90 is deductible 



as a charitable expense. 

The ALSAC/St Jude Chil- 
dren's Research Hospital, 

founded by the late entertainer, 
Danny Thomas, is the world's pre- 
mier international research center 
for catastrophic diseases in chil- 
dren. 

Alzheimer's Association. 
The association supports 
Alzheimer's disease research and 
provides services, support and so- 
lutions to Alzheimer's patients, 
family members and their care- 
givers. 

Boys & Girls Clubs of Chica- 
go. The charity's mission is to 
partner with families and commu- 
nities to enable young people in 
greater Chicago to grow up to be 
responsible, self-reliant, caring 
adults. 

Children's Memorial Hos- 
pital. For more than a century, 
Children's Memorial Hospital has 
been dedicated to care of children, 
pediatric research, medical educa- 
tion and child advocacy. 

The Cradle. The Evanston- 
bascd adoption agency works to 
benefit children by providing edu- 
cation, guidance and lifelong sup- 
port pn parenting choices. 

Illinois Spina Bifida Associ- 
ation. The ISBA is dedicated to 
improving the quality of life of 
people with spina bifida through 
support, programs and direct ser- 



/ 



Put your Pain in the 
hands of a specialist! 



DR. SCOTT REISER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC 

If any of these symptoms sound familiar, let us help you: 

* Headaches * Lower Back Pain * Sport Injuries 

* Neck Pain o r Stiffness or Pain * Whiplash 

* Auto or Work Related 

Injuries 



* Mid-Back Pain * Numbness or Pain 

in Arms or Legs 




Dr. Scott Roisor 



(847) 740-2800 

314 W. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach, IL 
(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

Auto and Work Related Injuries Excluded, But Covered 100%. 



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vices, while promoting improved 
treatment and public awareness. 

little City Foundation. 
The organization provides a 
wide range of life-enriching ser- 
vices for children and adults 
with mental retardation and oth- 
er developmental challenges, 
enabling them to lead satisfying 
and productive lives. 

March of Dimes Birth De- 
fects Foundation. As the No. 1 
voluntary organization deducted 
to improving infant and maternal 
health, March of Dimes work to 
prevent birth defects and infant 
mortality through programs of re- 
search, community services, edu- 
cation and advocacy. 

Misericordia Heart of Mer- 
cy Center. The organization is 
home to more than 550 children 
and adults with developmental 
and physical disabilities. Miseri- 
cordia provides support so that 
those children and adults can lead 
lives of dignity, respect, challenge 
and beauty. 

National Multiple Sclerosis 
Society. The society is dedicated 
to ending the devastating effects of 
multiple sclerosis by supporting 
more research and services than 
any other MS organization in the 
world. The Greater Illinois Chapter 
supports people with MS and their 
families through local' programs 
and services designed to educate 
and empower them, the Greater 
Illinois territory covers 73 counties 
and serves more than 1 1 ,000 peo- 
ple with MS. 

Ray Graham Association 
for People with Disabilities. 
Named after the first State of Illi- 
nois superintendent of special ed- 
ucation. Each day, children and 
adults with developmental disabil- 
ities, including mental retardation, 
cerebral palsy and autism, are sup- 
ported to become accepted and in- 
dependent in their daily lives. Ser- 
vices and support include voca- 
tional, social, recreational, trans- 
portation and residential pro- 
grams. 

Ronald McDonald House 
Charities. The organization pro- 
vides comfort and care to children 
and families through its network of 
local charities serving in 31 coun- 
tries. Its global network of local 
charities provides support to near- 
ly 200 Ronald McDonald Houses 
worldwide and has awarded nearly 
$200 million in grants to children's 
program worldwide. 






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January 28, 2000 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland Newspapers I C1 



FROM PAGE CIO 

BACK PAIN 



The site discusses common causes 
and then lists potential treatment 
options. According to' the Mayo 
Clinic, the goal of the site is to be a 
health resource for people. Be- 
cause people are always searching 
Tor ways to lead a healthier life, 
finding reliable health information 
will always'be a priority. Since 
mayohealth.com has the Mayo 
Clinic's credibility behind it, peo- 
ple arc more willing to trust the in- 
formation they receive. < 

Another source for informa- 
tion on back pain is the Web site 
www.drkoop.com. Created by the 
former Surgeon General, Dr. C. 
Everett Koop, the site aims to ele- 
vate the level of discourse between 
patients and doctors through pa- 
tient education. In addition to in- 
formation on treatments and 
causes of back pain, drkoop.com 
has a number of moderated dis- 
cussion groups on the subject. The 
discussion groups include "Beat- 
ing the Pain," "Back Pain Q&A," 
and "Oh My Aching Back." Each 
forum addresses different issues 
affecting back pain sufferers. 

One company that has taken 
an Interest In providing informa- 
tion on low back pain is Kinesis 
Medical, manufacturer of the Or- 
thotrac Pneumatic Vest back treat- 
ment. The treatment is an inflat- 
able vest that transfers body 
weight from a person's back, plac- 
ing it on the hips. This, in turn, re- 
duces pain by easing the interver- 
tebral compression that may be 
causing back pain. According to 
Kinesis, this gives patients free- 
dom of mobility and allows them 
to participate in prescribed exer- 
cise routines and return-to-work 
conditioning programs. 

However, the Orthotrac treat- 
ment is not appropriate for every- 
one, says Kevin Nickels, president 
of Kinesis Medical. So through the 
company's Web site, www.trcatmy 
back.com, Kinesis Medical pro- 
vides diagrams and information 
on the nature of back pain, links to 
back pain resources and a 15- 
question survey designed to help 
people determine whether they 
are a candidate for the Orthotrac 
treatment. The survey also is avail- 
able at 800-966-5285. 



Seminar aids 
in Alzheimer 
understanding 

Alzheimer's disease. Just the 
words alone evoke many different 
emotions in people. Concern, fear, 
misunderstanding, guilt and worry 
are just a few emotions brought up 
at the monthly Alzheimer Seminar 
given at Sheridan Health Care 
Center. Sharon Roberts, RN at the; 
Lake County Health Department 
and specialist in Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease, was the guest speaker. 
Roberts spoke about early stages 
of the disease and what are some 
ways to deal with it. 

Sheridan Health Care Center, 
located at 2534 Elim Avenue in 
Zion, is providing, at no charge, 
a monthly seminar on different 
subjects relating to Alzheimer's 
Disease. The seminars arc held 
on the third Tuesday of each 
month. 

February 15 is the date of the 
next seminar. The guest speaker 
will be Dr. Martin Gorbien. Dr. 
Gorbien is the director of the Sec- 
tion of Geriatric Medicine at Rush- 
Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical 
Center in Chicago. 

The seminar is open to the 
public and there is no charge. The 
facility is asking for RSVP. Those 
interested in attending may call 
the;facillty at 746-8435. 




F~E-r R U A R Y 



^HM 



At Midwes ti rn Regional Medical Center 



Mammogram: $49 

All month, by appointment 

A mammogram can help detect breast cancer before you can see or feci 
anything. Our caring and conscientious imaging specialist will fully 
explain the procedure, answer your questions, ana complete your mam- 
mogram, usually in less than 30 minutes. Results will be sent to your per- 
sonal physician. For an appointment, please call 847/731-4100. 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure Check 

All month, by appointment 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional at one of 
the physician offices listed below. Call the physician closest to you to. 
make an appointment. 

Free Class: Image Enhancement Program 

Meets Monthly 

Feeling comfortable with your appearance during and following cancer 
treatment can do a lot to help you feel better and more self-confident. 
Attend this program which teaches women and men how to prepare for 
hair loss and other cosmetic changes related to chemotherapy and radi- 
ation. Seating is limited. To register, please call 847/872-6062. 

Free Health Talk: Learning fo Manage Asthma 

Wednesday, February 2 4:30 - 6:00 p.m. 

Asthma cannot be cured, but it can be controlled and managed for almost 
everyone. Learn how to identify your asthma triggers, why peak flow 
meter readings arc essential and the differences between your asthma 



medications. Classes are open to adults with asthma and to children 
(along with their parent) over the age of 8. To register, please call 
847/872-6209. 

Support Group: Breast Cancer Support Group 

Monday, February 7 ......7 -. 8 p.m. 

The topic of this presentation will be "Massage for Mastectomy" conduct- 
ed by Marty Farber a nationally certified therapist and massage therapist 
at Midwestern Regional Medical Center. A support group for women 
affected by breast cancer. Share experiences, explore ideas, and express 
your feelings among a group of women who know what you're going 
through because they've been there too. For more information and to reg- 
ister, please call 847/872-6062. 

Free Clinic: Children's Immunization Clinic 

Saturday, February 12 9 - 11 a.m. 

Midwestern and the Lake County Health Department team up to provide 
low-cost immunizations for children during a walk-in clinic at the hospi- 
tal. For more information, please call 847/872-6062. 

Adult CPR Class: $25 

Monday, February 14 6 - 10 p.m. 

Cardiac arrest, breathing interruption and choking are life-threatening 
situations which require fast, skillful intercession by a trained person. 
Learn how to initiate CPR and other life-saving techniques during an 
evening class presented by a certified American Red Cross Instructor. 
Class size is limited. To register, please call 847/856-1220. 



At Cancer Resource Center 



Mammogram: $49 

All month, by appointment 

Shop for your health! Visit our Gurnee Mills location and have your mam- 
mogram performed by a caring and conscientious imaging specialist 
The $49 cost includes interpretation of your mammogram by a board- 
certified radiologist. Results will be sent to your physician. Weekday and 
weekend appointments arc available. For more information, or to sched- 
ule an appointment, please call 847/856-1220. 

Nutritional Counseling Service 

All month, by appointment 

A registered dietitian specializing in complementary nutritional therapy is 
available for in-pcrson or telephone consultation. This is a personalized 
service for anyone who wants to learn more about the role of nutrition in 
disease prevention, treatment or recovery. From cancer prevention to 
weight control, your individualized, scientifically based program will pro- 
mote optimal health and benefit for the whole family. For details regard- 
ing our nutritional services, or to schedule an appointment, please call 
847/856-1220. 

Free Assessment: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment 

All month 

Let a staff member at Cancer Resource Center help you determine your 
risk of developing breast cancer. By answering a few short questions, a 
computer generated assessment tool will estimate your breast cancer risk 
over the next five years and during your lifetime. Please note that this 
assessment is for information purposes only and should not replace rou- 
tine mammograms or regular clinical breast exams. For more informa- 
tion, please call 847-856-1220. 



Free Screening: Colorectal Cancer Home Test 

Tuesday, February 15 10 a.m. - 12 noon 

Colorectal cancer is one of the most frcquendy diagnosed cancers affect- 
ing men and women over age 40. One of the early warning signs, hidden 
blood in the stool, may be detected by using a simple do-at-home test 
Visit the Cancer Resource Center during the above hours and receive your 
free screening kit with instructions for use. To reserve a colorectal home 
test, please call 847/856-1220. 

For more information and to register for any Healthy Habits program, 

PLEASE CALL 847/856-1220 

Locations: 



Free Demonstration: Reflexology By Relaxus 

Monday, February 21 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Reflexology is an age old holistic healing technique which works to bal- 
ance all body systems, stimulating an underactive area and calming an 
overactive area. Utilizing a team approach, Bill and Kay Furlong, certified 
reflexologists, will work together applying specific pressure techniques 
using the thumb, fingers and hand on reflexes of the feet and hands. A 10 
minute session will benefit people of any age or sex in attaining and main- 
taining better state of health. To schedule an appointment, please call 
847/856-1220. 

Free Cooking Demo: For the Love of Beans 

Thursday, February 24 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

A nice way to be good to your heart is to include a variety of beans in your 
diet. That adorable pod can provide you with cholesterol-lowering sup- 
port and an abundance of creative outlets in the kitchen. Come to a food 
demonstration where you will learn about and taste those remarkable 
beans. Recipes will be provided. Please call early to reserve your seat 
To register call 847/856-1220. 

■ 

Free Screening: Blood Pressure 

Saturday, February 26. 10 a.m.- 12 noon 

Have your blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional. To reg- 
ister please call 847/856/1220. 

Free Talk: T'ai Chi Chih! Joy Thru Movement 

Saturday, February 26 1:30 - 2:30 p.m. 

T'ai Chi Chih is a simple, easy-to-learn, moving meditation form. It can 
be done by anyone regardless of age or physical condition. With regular 
T'ai Chi Chih practice one may experience improved balance, blood pres- 
sure control and aid stress. Donna McElhose is a certified T'ai Chi Chih 
instructor. Wear comfortable clothes and bring socks or soft soled shoes. 
Please call 847/856-1220 to register. 



Gurnee 

Cancer Resource Center 

Gumce Mills, Entrance II 

6170 W.Grand Ave. 

847/856-1220 ' 



Gurnee 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. Glynls Vashi 

25 Tower Court 

847/263-9900 



Lake Villa 

Family & Internal Medicine 

Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Daisy Andaleon 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

. 847/356-6602 



Undenhurst 

Internal Medicine 

Dr. Philippa Devenney 

2045 E. Grand Ave 

847/356-6131 



Midwestern^ 

■ E.GIOHAL MEDICAL CEHTEI 




Waukegan Waukegan Zion Zion 

Family Medicine Family & Internal Medicine Family & Internal Medicine Midwestern Regional 



Glen Flora Medical Clinic 

Dr. Campo Sucscan 

935 Glen Flora Ave. 

847/249-3322 



Dr. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Leyla Soils 
Dr. Daisy Andaleon 
2504 Washington Ave^f 
847/249-1733 £ 



Dr.. Pedro Palu-ay 

Dr. Leyla Soils 

Dr. Daisy Andaleon 

2606 Ellsha 

847/872-4558 



Medical Center. 

Cancer Treatment Centers 

of America 

2520 Elisha Ave. 

847/872-4561 




CANCER 

TREATMENT 
CENTERS 
OF AMERICA* 



Winning ttw flght agiliut cancer, every day." 



www.cancercenter.com 



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i 



1 
t 



C12 I lakeland Newspapers HEALTHWATCH January 28,2000 

Is it too late for 
my daughter? 



Hi Dr. Singer, 

My daughter is 9 years old 
and has been a challenge for us 
since she was 3. Since that time, 
I have been wanting to go to 
someone like you to help us 
change her behavior, but my 
husband won't hear of it Now, 
she is 9 and really out of con- 
trol. I have watched her get 
worse and worse. I'm afraid of 
what she might be like at 15 if 
we don't change tilings now. 
Before, my husband said that 
we didn't need it Now he says 
that It's too late to do anything 
about it Is it too late or do we 
still have a chance? Are all Dads 
like tilts? I love my daughter 
and am really afraid for her. 
Please help. Also, I see a lot of 
kids just like her. Why are so 
many kids misbehaving? Have 
we lost it? Frantic Mom! 

Hi Frantic Mom, 

I'm so sorry that you have had 
this experience. First, I will tell you 
that most of the time, it is the moms 
who want the therapy. I don't want 
to get into any "Dad-bashing," be- 
cause there are all kinds of Dads out 
there. I also do not want to general- 
ize or stereotype, however, in my 
experience, generally speaking, 
therapy of any kind is usually a 
woman-initiated activity. That 
doesn't mean Dads don't care. 

It sounds like you have several 
levels of issues here. I want you to 
know first, though, at 9 it's not too 
late at all. As a matter of fact, when I 
see parents with kids 10 and under I 
will be able to help them complete- 
ly eradicate their problem within 
three weeks. When people come to 
me with kids over 10, 1 can still help 
them eradicate the problem, but it 
may be a little bit longer. 

The rule of thumb is, "the older 
the child is, the longer they have 
practiced the same bad habits, the 
harder it is to eradicate the behav- 
ior." In fact, the ultimate pain I have 
seen parents experience is not do- 
ing anything to slop bad behavior 
when the child is young and then 
have to witness the child in trouble 
well into adulthood. It happens 
more often than you think. 

Unfortunately, many parents 
view bad behavior as a stage or 
phase the child will automatically 
grow out of. That could not be fur- 
ther from the truth. The longer they 
are practiced the more permanent 
they become. Most parents also 
know what the right thing is to do, 
but many times, can be diverted 
from that right thing by emotions or 
"Oscar-winning performances" by 
their child. 

They say hindsight is 20/20. 1 
specialize in making foresight 20/20 
so that hindsight can be more plea- 
surable for everyone involved. The 
simple truth is that eradicating this 
kind of bad behavior is not as hard 
as you might think. Also, there is 
nothing to be embarrassed about (it 
sounds like your husband might 
be.) All kids misbehave at times. 
That isn't abnormal. It's when that 
child's misbehavior is allowed to 
continue into young adult and' 
adult misbehavior that the real em- 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Dr. Sherri Singer 



barrassment begins. 

Even if your husband won't go 
with you, I suggest you call me, 
come in and we can straighten this 
out together. My class is short and 
sweet and restores parent's power 
in helping their kids stay on track. It 
also helps parents get together on 
the same wavelength so that com- 
munication between parents feels 
belter. 

In answer to your List question, 
about why so many kids are in trou- 
ble now... I believe that we have all 
been trained by the "so-called" ex- 
perts to make compassion for our 
kids our first priority, regardless of 
the situation. Compassion is impor- 
tant but so is discipline. No one 
likes lo be exposed to a child's bad 
behavior. This goes for both adults 
and kids. If we give compassion 
while our child is being obnoxious, 
our child will expect the rest of who 
he meets to follow suit. If we train 
our child that obnoxious behavior is 
not acceptable, the child will learn 
to modify his or her responses. This 
could ultimately save the child's fu- 
ture. 

There needs to be a balance be- 
tween compassion and discipline 
and I feel that our society and many 
of those in power have encouraged 
leaning so far in the direction of 
anything goes — no punishment 
and no standards in (he name of 
compassion— that we are witness- 
ing a whole generation of kids who 
are doing what comes naturally 
(limitless behavior) and getting 
away with it because adults are not 
stopping it. That is the way bad be- 
havior grows and blossoms. 

Unfortunately, these same kids, 
who have been allowed to tantrum 
and misbehave in the name of com- 
passion, are having quite a rude 
awakening when they come in con- 
tact with the real world that docs 
not have much compassion and ex- 
pects things like good and decent 
behavior. To me, this is the ultimate 
injustice to kids. If we do not pre- 
pare them to be able to survive in 
the world they will live in as adults, 
we are failing them. Love should al- 
ways be there between you and 
your child, unconditionally. Com- 
passion should be there when it's 
warranted and structure and disci- 
pline must always be in place. In 
fact, unconditional love is the very 
thing that should make it possible 
for you to set those limits and feel 
good about it. 

Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist and Childhood 
Behavior Specialist. She regularly 
works in person with many readers 
of this column. She is the author of, 
"Wliy Kids Misbehave" and "Raising 
Kids Wlio Don't Become Your Worst 
Nightmare." For an appointment or 
to purchase either of Dr. Singer's 
books, please call (847) 577-8832 or 
(708) 962-2549. 



Learn how volunteering can 
improve the quality of your life 



Volunteers help many people in 
our community. They help the el- 
derly, the sick, the needy. What we 
often forget is that volunteers also 
help themselves. 

Volunteering provides a sense 
of purpose and fulfillment, it allows 
people to reach out to others, make 
new friends. 

The Victory Community Elder- 



CARE program will begin its free 
2000 community education series, 
"Issues of Aging," at 7 p.m. on Mon- 
day, January 31, in the Great Room 
at the Independent Living Center, 
Village at Victory Lakes, Grand Av- 
enue, Lindenhurst. 

To register for this free seminar, 
call 360-4004, between 8 a.m. and 4 
p.m. Monday through Friday. 



Round Lake 
Family Physicians 

Complete care for the entire, family- 

707 West Railroad, Round Lake 

(847) 546-8777 
J. Nho, M.D. 
c i? i fuiAin M. Lim, M.D. 

S. Felsenthal, M.D. 

We proudly announce the addition of Dr. Susan Felsenthal in the prac- 
tice of internal medicine. Dr. Felsenthal received her doctor of medicine 
degree from the Chicago Medical School, and completed her internship 
and residency at Cook County Hospital. 




For more information or to set up an appointment, please call. 



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January 28, 2000; ȣ\ 



i1»"V 



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Lakeland Newspapers I C 13 



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DEATH NOTICES 



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Edna May Abbs, age flU ofWadsworth 
Arr: Salata Gumee Funeral Home, 
Gurncc 

CHURCH 

Michucl D. Church, age 54 of Hawthorn 

Woods 

Arr: Kristan Funeral Home, PC, Mundclein 

BREIVNAN 

Edward J. Brennan, age 86 of Grayslake 
Arr Kristan Funeral Home, Mundelein 



LEE 

Robert D. Lee, age 57 of Wauconda 

Ait: Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home, 

Wauconda 

Z1EMANN 

Joseph A. Ziemann, age 77 of Mundelein 
Am Kristan Funeral Home, PC, Mundelein 

TOLII 

Agnes Toll! , age 86 of Libertyville 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Libertyville 




Newspapers 



Funeral Directory 



CONNOIMV1CVAY 
CREMATION & 
FUNERAL CARE 

Crossings Plaza 

300 N. Milwaukee Ave., 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847)265-4370 

Mike Connor & Steve McVay, 

Directors 

JIISTEN'S ROUND LAKE . 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court 

{Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847} 546-3300 

Nancy Justen & Mark Justen, 

Directors 

Additional Locations in 

McHenry and Wonder Lake 

K.K. HAMSHER FUNERAL 
HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakee Lake Rti., Fox 

Lake, IL 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra 

Hamsher Glen, Directors 



RJNGA 
FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake 

Villa, IL 

. (847) 356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

SPRING GROVE 
FUNERAL CHAPEL 

8103 Wilmot Rd., P.O. Box 65, 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-0550 or Toll Free 

(888) 394-8744 

. Kurk R Paleka, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

(847) 395-4000 
Dan Dugenske, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL 
AND CREMATORIUM, LTD. 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847)223-8122 . 
David G. Strang and Richard 
A Gaddis, Director ; • 







f -iii,. j" 



Mitchell E. Gnarro 

Age 45, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2000. He 
was bom on Aug. 8,- 1954 in libertyville and has been a resi- 
dent of Lake County all of his life. Served in the United States 
Marine Corps and was a Journeyman with Electrician's Local 
150 of Waukegan. 

He leaves his parents, Edward (Gloria) Gnarro; brothers, 
Mark and Steven Gnarro both of Grayslake. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake withFr. James Merold of 
Queen of Peace Catholic Church officiating. 

Interment followed at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville, 

Walter Walt' Soby 

He died Jan. 19, 2000. Walter was bom in Cook County, 
and was the son of the late, Arthur and Lillian Grunwald Soby 
Huck He retired from Dayco Company in Easley and was a 
member of Moose Lodge ofHuntsvUle, Ala. 

Surviving are his wife, Jeanne Adams Soby of the home; 
two daughters, Deborah Byrne of Long Grove and Kathryn 
Englund of Hawthorne Woods; two brothers, Teddy Soby and 
Michael Soby both of Trevor, Wis.; a sister, Linda Soby of 
Gumee; stepmother, Jean Soby of Antioch; six grandchildren 
and one great grandchild. 

Memorials may be made to the Cancer Society of 
Greenville County 1 13 Mills Ave., Greenville, SC 29605 or to 
Hospice of SL Francis Hospital, 414-A Pettigru St., Greenville, 
SC 29601 

William A. Loeper 

Age 50 of Willcox, Ariz., formerly of Antioch, passed 
away Jan. 6, 2000 at University Medical Center, Tucson, Ariz. 
He was bom Jan, 25, 1949 in Libertyville, the son of John G, 
and Ellen Louise (Frey) Loeper and had lived in Antioch as a 
young boy. Mr. Loeper worked as a truck driver and had lived 
many places before settling in Willcox, Ariz. He enjoyed trav-' 
cling and playing billiards. He was a loving and caring father 
and grandfather, and will be sadly missed by his family and 
friends. On Aug. 17, 1974 he married Susan Norstrom in 
Waukegan. 

Survivors include his wife, Susan; four children, Tina 
(Lloyd) Tubbs of Big Flats, Wis., Anthony (Aimee) of Elgin, 
William Jr. of Kenosha, Wis. and Eva Loeper of Tucson, Ariz; 
his mother, Louise Loeper of Antioch; six grandchildren, 
Ashlynn, Mercades, Clayton, Christina, Mallory and Anthony 
Jr.; one brother, John (Micky) Loeper of Zion; one sister, 
Linda (Ed) Daszkiewicz of Crossville, Tenn. and several 
nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his father, 
John and one sister, Lorraine Loeper. 

A Memorial Service will be held 7. p.m. Friday, Jim. 28 at 
(he Strang Funeral Home of Amioch, 1055 Main St., Otoiite 
83) Antioch. 

Friends may call at the funeral home from 5 p.m. Friday, 
Jan. 26 until time of services. 

Interment was private. 

Howard Lee 

Age 86, of Round Lake Park, passed away on Jan. 19, 2000 
at Condell Medical Center, Libertyville, Howard was bom on 
Jan. 8, 19 14 and has been a resident of Round Lake Park since 
1952, formerly of Chicago. He retired in 1973 from Motorola 
after years of service as an electrical engineer. He was for- 
merly employed part time at Master Golf in Grayslake, a 
member for over 60 years at the Norge Ski Club of Fox River 
Grove. He was also an avid bingo player. 

He leaves his children, Lora (James) Bush of Lake Forest, 
Bonnie (Terrance) Mahoney of Round Lake, Thomas 
(Annette) Lee of Gumee arid Ronald (Patricia) Lee of Beach 
Park; 10 grandchildren; 1 1 great grandchildren and a niece, 
Jan Lenzen of Fox Lake, He is preceded in death by his wife, 
Dorothy (nee Neveu) on April 15, 1989; his sister, Lorraine 
Krott in 1999 and great grandchild, Trevor HofQander in 
1996. 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake with Rev. Richard Rubietta 
officiating. 

Interment followed at Avon Centre Cemetery, Grayslake. 

Joseph E Wiatr, Sr. 

Age 80, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2000 at the VA 
Medical Center, North Chicago He was born May 20, 1919 in 
Chicago, the son of the late John and Adela (Karczmarczyk) 
Wiatr. He served in the US. Army WWII and when he 
returned he moved to Round Lake in 1946, then to Las Vegas 
in 1981 and to Antioch in 1991. He was a member of Prince 
of Peace Church in Lake Villa and a former member of the 
American Legion in Round Lake. Joe worked for the former 
International Harvester co. as a machinist, retiring in 1981. 
On April 18, 1940 he married Dorothy Bannach in Chicago 
and she preceded him in death on April 10, 1999. 

Survivors include, two daughters, Debbie (Mark) 
Esposito of Round Lake and Barbara (Pete) Clonts of 
Semmes, Ala.; two sisters, Irene (Walter) Marus and Loretta 
Gryzlo both of Chicago; 10 grandchildren and 11 great 
grandchildren. In addition to his wife, he Is preceded in 
death by three sons, Joseph Jr., Donald and Phillip and one 
sister, Helen McCarthy, * 

Funeral Services were held at the Strang Funeral Home 
of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to a family 
memorial. 

G wendollyn 'Peggy' Murrie 

Age 84 of Salem, Wis., passed away Thursday, Jan. 20, 



2000 at Memorial Hospital, Burlington, Wis, She was bom, 
March 3, 191 5 in Salem, Wis. the daughter of the late, Walter 
and Ida (Richards) Shotton and has been a lifelong resident. 
She was educated in the local schools and on Nov. 4, 1 940 she 
married John 'Stub* Murrie in Des Moines, Iowa. He preced- 
ed her in death on Feb. 17, 197 1 . 

Survivors include her two daughters-in-law, Elsa Murrie 
of St. Louis, Mo. and Kathryn Murrie of Bristol, Wis.; four 
grandchildren, Traci (Jerry) Keisler, Wendy, Heather and 
Michael Murrie and her great grandson, Jake Adam Keisler. 
She is preceded in death by two sons, James and William 
Murrie and a brother James Shotton. 

Memorial Funeral Services were held at the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Interment of her cremains were private at Hillside 
Cemetery, Antioch. 

Memorials may be made to Meals on Wheels, 19200 93 rd 
SL, Bristol, Wis. 53104 In her memory. 

Carl B. Wurster 

Age 77 of Antioch, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2000 at 
his home. He was bom Nov. 1, 1922 in Elizabeth, the son of. 
the late George and Marie (Salzer) Wurster moving to 
Antioch in 1932. Carl served in the U.S. Army during WWII 
and was a member of the Lakes Region Historical Society. He 
formerly worked in the Cyclone Fence Division of U.S. Steel 
in North Chicago, as a shipping expediter and presently 
worked for the State Bank of the Lakes in maintenance and 
as a courier. 

, Survivors include his children, Kathleen Wurster of 
Chicago, Carleen Wurster of Antioch, David Wurster of 
Rolling Meadows, Doreen (Richard) Mitchell of Oak Park; a 
step daughter, Judy (Ed) Manning of Waukegan, his former 
wife, Betty Sutcliffe of Antioch; two sisters, Marie Sterbenzof 
Bristol, Wis and Clara Stasior of Waukegan; one brother, 
William Wurster of Marble Falls,, Tex.; two grandchildren, 
Melinda and Deanne and one great grandson, Ryan, He is 
preceded in death by his wife Doris. 

Visitation for family and friends was held at Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch. " 

Memorial Funeral Services were held at the United 
Methodist Church, Antioch. 

In 1 leu of fl owers, donations may be made to the Amioch 
Rescue Squad or the William E. Brook Memorial Wetland and 
Entertainment Center, in his memory. 

Juan A. Rangel 

Age 79 ofWaukegan, passed away Friday, Jan; 21 , 2000 at 
Northshore Terrace Nursing Facility in Waukegan. He was 
bom Dec. 8, 1920 in Texas and had mode his home in Illinois. 
A resident of Waukegan the past nvo years, formerly of 
Round Lake Mr. Rangel worked as a journeyman in the 
plumbing industry the majority of his life. A veteran of the 
United States Army serving during WWII. 

He leaves his loving wife, Nancy (nee Rodriguez); chil- 
dren, Juanita (Juventino) Aldana, Lucille (Sergio) Hernandez 
Sr., all of Round Lake, Rose Mary Moreno and Juan Range! Jr. 
all of Waukegan, Eusebio Rangel of Zion, Jose Rangel of 
Racine, Wis. and Patricio Rangel of Round Lake Beach; 10 
grandchildren and great grand daughter, Maya; sisters, Isabel 
Valle, Julia Rodriguez all of Texas; brothers, Pete Rangel of 
Texas and Jose (Dora) Rangel of Colorado He is preceded in 
death by his brothers, David, Rosalio Jr., and Clemente; one 
sister, Trinidad. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at Holy Cross Cemetery, Racine, Wis. 

Memorials may be given to the family in memory of Mr. 
Rangel. 

Karen K. Gareiss 

Age 58, a Lake County residents for-35 years, and for- 
merly of Eddyville, Iowa, died Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000 at the 
Condell Medical Center in Libertyville. She was bom on June 
29, 1941 in Eddyville, Iowa; to Lloyd and Lois Chambers (nee 
Billings). She was a secretary at the Raymond Chevy and 
Oldsmobile dealership in Antioch. She enjoyed working with 
various craft projects, and spending time with her family. 

She Is survived by her husband, Fred W. Gareiss Jr., of 
Lake Villa; two sons, Gary (Donna) Gareiss of Lake Villa and 
Michael (Sherri) Gareiss of Fox Lake; three brothers, Gary 
(Cathy) Chambers of St. Charles, Dan (Kathy) Chambers of 
Eddyville, Iowa, and Larry Chambers of Albia, Iowa; six 
grandchildren, Shawn and Ashley of Fox Lake and Eric, 
Heather, Danny and Aleeshia all of Lake Villa. 

Funeral Services were held at the K K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (the Chapel on the Lake) 

Interment followed at Grant Cemetery in Ingleside. 

Laura A. Iferzog (nee Sevilla) 

Age 86 of Ingleside, died Jan. 23, 2000 at MotherTheresa 
Home. Bom in Chicago, residing in Ingleside for the past 48 
years. 

Survived by her daughter, Rosemarie (Glenn) McAdam; 
devoted two grandsons, William (Lisa) McAdam and Robert 
McAdam; two great grandsons, Brandon and Christopher 
McAdam, all of Le'mont; two sisters, Mary Louise Kiraly of, 
Arlington Heights, and Lupe (Edward) Eggers of Elgin; and a 
brother, William (Peggy) Sevilla of Chicago. She Is preceded 
in death by her husband, Raymond Herzog. 

Funeral Services were held at Markiewicz Funeral 
Home, Lemon t. 

A Funeral Mass was celebrated at the Saints Cyril and 
Methodius Church. 






j.mri i L.-jiKMiu ■_„>. i iiii ', ■>, >( 



Continued on next page 



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C 1 4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 



January 28, 2000 



? 



Continued from previous page 

Interment was at All Saints 
Cemetery, Des Plaines. 

In lieu of flowers, donations may be 
made to Vitas Hospice. 

Mary Ann Meyer (nee 
Mueller) 

Age 28 of Rockport, Tex., formerly of 
Wadsworth, died Jan. 24, 2000 at 
Highland Park Hospital. She was bom 
Dec. 21, 1971 in Evanston. Maryann was 
a housewife, a member of St. Patrick's 
Catholic Cburch, Wadsworth, a former 
member of AQHA; BJQHA; WJQHA; 4-H 
of Lake County; Big 'Z' Riding Club; Lake 
County Posse and Waukegan Red Devils 
Rifle team. She was a 1986 graduate of St. 
Patrick Grade school, a 1990 graduate of 
Zion-Benton High School and a 1992 
GIA graduate of Gemologists of Santa 
Monica, Calif. 

She is survived by her husband, 
Richard of Rockport, Tex.; direc children, 
Jill, Kevin, and Randi of Wadsworth; her 
mother, Sally Mueller (nee Kruger) of 
Wadsworth; father, Michael N. Mueller 
Sr. of Antioch; a brother, Mike Jr. (Rachel) 
of Wadsworth; grandmother, Bcrnice P. 
Kruger of Skokie; nieces, Christina, 
Headier and Ariel; uncle Dave Kruger of 
Stevens Point, Wis.; dear friend of Kara 
(Dave) Morley and Iva Campbell of 
Rockport, Tex. 

Funeral Services were held at St. 
Patrick Church, Wadsworth. 

Friends and family visited at the • 
Marsh Funeral Home, Ltd., Gurnee 

Interment was at Ascension 
Cemetery, Libertyville. 

In lieu of flowers contributions may 
be made to the Mary Meyer Fund c/o 
Linda Kornhauser, 26615 W. Stonegate, 
Antioch, IL 60002. 

Wilma Patryn (nee Theves) 

Age 90, an Ingleside resident for over 
60 years, died Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2000 at 
the Manor Care Nursing Home in 
Ubertyville. She was bom on May 21, 
1909 and had been a housewife in her 
home. She enjoyed her quilUng club, 
sewing, knitting, gardening and reading. 

Survivors include, one son, Frank 
Patryn of Texas; a grandson, Patrick 
(Jennifer) Patryn of Green Bay, Wis.; her 
daughter-in-law, Germaine 'Gerry' 
Patryn of Ingleside; nieces, nephews and 
other relatives. She is preceded in death 
by her husband, Edward Patryn on Nov. 
4, 1993; her son, Lorenz'Lorry' Patryn on 
Oct. 17, 1996; her brother, Matthew 
Hornung and her sister, Catherine 
Cassell. 

Friends of die family may call on 
Saturday, Jan. 29, from 11 a.m. with 
Funeral Services conducted at I p.m., at 
the K. K. Hamsher Funeral Home, 12 N. 
Pistakee Lake Rd„ Fox Lake (the Chapel 
on die Lake). 

Interment following public services 
will be private. 

Memorials may be given to St. Bede 
Catholic Church, Ingleside or a favorite 
charity of your choice in lieu of flowers. 

Marie Lydia (Gannott) Hill 

Age 92, died Friday, Jan. 21, 2000 at 
Alden Terrace of McHenry, She was bom 
Feb. 18, 1907 inWalwortli, Wis. to Charles 
and Mary Gannott. She was married to 
Harry W. Hill who worked for the 
Milwaukee Road for 48 years before retir- 
ing. They were lifelong residents of Fox 
Lake. She was a homemaker, much loved 
wife, mother, and grandmother. She is 
preceded in death by her beloved hus- 



band, Harry in July of 19B0. 

Surviving are her daughter, Lois 
(Earl) Gramza of Fox Lake; two grand- 
sons, Michael (Kelly) Gramza of Coal City 
and Earl (Theresa) Gramza of Fox Lake; 
two grand daughters, Judith (James) 
Scanlon of Johnsburg and Peggy 
(William) Hardt of Morganton, NC; 10 
great grandchildren and 10 great, great 
grandchildren. 

A family Memorial Service will be 
held at a later date. 

Otto G. Hauser 

■ Age 95 of Wadsworth, passed away 
Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000 at St. Therese 
Medical Center, Waukegan, He was bom 
Oct. 18, 1904 in Millburn, the son of the 
late Frank M. and Rcgitta (Ahart) Hauser 
and has been a lifelong resident of Lake 
County. He was a farmer all of his life and 
a member of the Lake County Farm 
Bureau. On Jan. 7, 1939, he married 
Dolores Molitar in Brighton, Wis. and 
she preceded him in death on Aug. 1, 
1991. 

Survivors include two sons, Clayton 
(Debbie) Hauser and Donald (Nell) 
Hauser both of Wadsworth; five grand- 
children and two great grandchildren. In 
addition to his wife he is preceded in 
death by one brother, Frank Hauser and 
four sisters, Susan Nauta, Mamie Nauta, 
Julia Ofenloch and Madeline ZicharUi. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang 
Funeral Home ofAntioch with Rev. James 
Merold officiating. 

Interment was at Ascension 
Cemelery, Libertyville. 

Evelyn M. Larson 

Age 77, formerly of Zion died Nov. 
21, 2000 at the Aurora Medical Center in 
Kenosha, Wis. She was born Nov. 1 9, 1 922 
in Grayslake, die daughter of die late 
Albert and Winifred Horton. She moved 
to Zion in 1956, and to Kenosha, Wis. four 
years ago. She worked as a waitress for 
the Home Cafe, the Hiway Lunch, 
Lakeview and HonVxin Restaurants for 
many ycare. She will be sadly missed by 
her many bingo friends at Our Lady of 
Humility and Kenosha Garden 
Apartments. 

She is survived by five children, 
Floyd 'Butch' (Julie) Duncan of Zion, 
Wayne (Linda) Duncan of Zion, Jeanne 
Larson (Bundy) Wayne of Kenosha, Wis., 
Randy Larson of Zion and Larry Larson of 
Kenosha, Wis.; eight grandchildren, Paul, 
Nicholas, O.J., Daniel, Tammy, Terri, 
Randy Jr., and Charlene; and eight great 
grandchildren. She is preceded in death 
by her husband, Chris Larson and two 
brothers, AI and Louis Horton. 

A Funeral Service was held at 
Congdon Funeral Home, Zion. 

Interment was at Avon Centre 
Cemetery, Grayslake. 

Alfred A. Richter 

Age 79 of Lake Villa, passed away at 
home on Sunday, Jan. 23, 2000. He was 
born in Chicago, on Nov. 20, 1920, die 
son of the late, Paul and Minnie Richter. 
He was a resident of the Lake Villa area 
for the past 15 years, having lived in 
Chicago prior to his move. He was a vet- 
eran ofWorld War II, serving with die U.S. 
Army. He retired from die Schwinn 
Bicycle Co. after 30 years of service. He 
then continued working as a wheel 
repairman for die Harness Racing tracks 
in the Chicago area for 15 years. 

He is survived by his wife, Dorothy 
'SueXthey were united in, marriage on 
Feb. 14, 1942) and his son, Don. He is pre- 
ceded in death by his brother, Paul 



Richter Jr. 

Funeral Services were held at Ringa 
Funeral Home, Lake Villa widi the Rev. 
John W. Zellmer, Pastor of Good 
Shepherd Ludieran Church officiadng. , 

Private entombment was held af 
Concordia Cemetery, Forest Park. 

In lieu of flowers, memorials in his 
memory to Condcll Hospital Hospice will , 
be appreciated. 

Dorothy Niebur (nee Fallon) 

A 30 resident of Fox Lake, formerly of 
Chicago. Former tavern owner of Dot 
and Ed's Club in Chicago. 

Beloved wife of the late, Edward F. 
Niebur who passed away in 1985. Loving 
modier of Martin H. (Marianne) Niebur 
of Done, Wis., Lawrence (Norma) Niebur 
of Springfield, Kenneth 'Mike' Niebur of 
Chicago,. Gary Niebur of Wordi, and 
Patricia Ann Rice of Orange, Calif. Dear 
grandmother of Julie Pettis of Orange, 
Calif., Scott (Molly) Rice of Anaheim, 
Calif,, Rachel Niebur of California, Kade, 
Edward, Martin and Dennis Niebur, all of 
Mokena,. Great grandchildren also sur- 
vive. Fond sister of Evelyn Crampton of 
Northlake and Dolores Dash of 
Homewood. 

Funeral Services were held at the K. 
K. Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (die 
Chapel on the Lake) 

Interment followed at the Grant 
Cemetery in Ingleside. 

Rosa Frida Gutgesell 

Age 96, passed away Jan. 23, 2000 in 
Lake County. She was bom Aug. 5, 1903 
in Germany. 

She is the mother of Elfriede 
Guenther; grandmother of three and 
great grandmother of six. 

Funeral Services were private. 

James P. Nyholm 

Age 38 of Lake Villa, passed away Jan. 
23, 2000 at Condell Medical Center In 
Libertyville. Bom Aug. 5, 1961 die son of 
John Nyholm Sr. and Elaine (Porter) 
Nyholm. He married Chrisdne (Dude) 
Nyholm on April 1 i, 1987 and was a resi- 
dent of Lake Villa for 1 1 years coming 
from Park Ridge, He was a field service 
engineer for Stoner and Co. in Crystal 
Lake and was previously employed at 
MAN Roland for several years and 
received training for sheet-fed printing 
presses in Offenbach, Germany. From his 
youth, he spent summers with his family 
in Hancock, Wis. and had a love of travel. 
He was a man of many interests and had 
an enjoyment of life. A highly intelligent, 
skilled and talented person, known for 
his inquisidvc nature and great sense of 
humor. His many interests and hobbies 
included railroading, boating, vintage 
cars, NASCAR racing, a variety of music, 
playing the trombone, an avid reader 
who also enjoyed his amateur "Ham" 
radio license. He was a member of 
Chicago Land Rover Club and attended 
Fox Lake Community Church. A devoted, 
loving and supportive husband who will 
be sorely missed. We are saddened, and 
the loss of him will be felt by many, but 
we are joyful, in that, he is now widi the 
family of God forever. 

Survivors include his wife, Christine; 
fadier, John Nyholm Sr. of Park Ridge; 
brother, John Nyholm Jr. (Vicki) of Des 
Plaines; niece, Shanna Bude; nephews, 
Nathaniel Bude, Jededloh and Michael 
Butt; and five Dachshunds. 

Visitadon will be from 1050 a.m. 
until noon on Saturday, Jan. 29, followed 
by die Funeral Service at noon at Fox 
Lake Community Church, 25 Big Hollow 



Road, Fox Lake, with Pastor Wayne buttons may be directed to Save-a-Pet of 



Christensen officiadng along with Rev. 
Norman Bude, Pastor of Faith United 
Methodist Church of Brillion, Wis. 

Interment will be private. 

In lieu of flowers, memorial contrl- 



Grayslake or the American Cancer 
Society. 

Arrangements were entrusted to 
Connor-McVay Cremation and Funeral 
Care, Lake Villa. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
CHANGE OF OWNER'S LEGAL NAME OR ADDRESS 
OR BUSINESS ADDRESS CHANGE OR ADDITION 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 

) SS 
COUNTY OF MCHENRY ) 

INTHE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUCIDIAL CIRCUIT, MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF GENERAL 

No. 

James Lawrence 

Davis Jr. 

FOR CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION (ADULT) 

Public nolice is hereby given lhat on March 28, 2000, 9 a.m. I will file and request a, 

hearing on my Petition in the Circuit Court of Ihe Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, McHenry 

County, Illinois, praying (or the change of my name from James Lawrence Davis, Jr. 

to that of James Lawrence Hallotis pursuant to the Illinois Compiled Statutes on 

Change ol Names. 

Dated at McHenry, Illinois, January 21 , 2000. 

/s/ James Lawrence Davis, Jr. 

Petitioner 

0100D-3121-FL 

January 26, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Grant Community High School, 
Board of Education (or District #124 in 
Lake Counly, Slate ol Illinois 
announces: 

An amended budget for the fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1999 and end- 
ing June 30, 2000 will be available for 
public Inspection, and will be filed In 
the office of the Assistant 
Superintendent alter January 20, 
2000 at 285 E. Grand Avenue, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020. 

Notice is further given that a pub- 
lic hearing on said budget will be held 
at 7 p.m. on the 16th day ol March, 
.2000 in the School District #124 
library, 285 East Grand Avenue, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020. Board ol Education ol 
School District #124, in County of 
Lake, State of Illinois. 
Board of Education 
January 20, 2000 

0100D-3122-FL 
January 28, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 
Notice Is hereby given lhat THE VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE, Fox Lake, Illinois, will 
receive sealed proposals until: 

Thursday. February 10. 20OQ at 10:00 A.M. In the Council Chambers, Village ol 
Fox Lake at which time bids will be opened for Ihe following: " 

Proposed .500 MG Elevated Water Spheroid 
Plans, specifications and proposal forms may be obtained from Morris 
Engineering, Inc., 47 Nlppersink Blvd., Fox Lake, Illinois 60020. and the Village of Fox 
Lake Village Hall, 301 South Route 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 upon a non-refund- 
able deposit of $75.00. All bids must be accompanied by bid security equal to 5% ofj 
the amount of Ihe bid, in the lorm ol a certified check, cashiers check or a bid bond 
written by a company properly licensed in Illinois. 

The successful bidder shall be required to lurnish a contract bond written by a . 
company licensed in Illinois. The bond will be in the amount equal to 1 1 0% ol Ihe con- 
tract amount. 

Each bid must be received in a sealed envelope, which Is marked In Ihe lower left- 
hand corner EXACTLY as follows: 
BID: Village of Fox Lake 

Proposed .500 MG Elevated Water Spheroid 
No bid may be withdrawn for a period ol sixty (60) days. 
The lowest and best proposal received will be accepled, but the OWNER reserves 
the right to reject any or all proposals received and to waive informalities. 

0100D-3127-GEN 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

In accordance with Section 6-10 of the Property Tax Code (35 ILCS, 200/6-10), an 
examination will be conducted by the Illinois Department of Revenue lor persons 
wanting to qualify as either a regular or additional member of Ihe Lake County Board 
of Review. The examination will be given on Wednesday, February 16, 2000 at 9 a.m. 
In the Assembly Room on the 10th Floor of the Lake County Administration Building 
located at 18 North County Street, Waukegan, Illinois. 

The regular Board ol Review consists of three members appointed by Ihe Counly 
Board. Two are selected from the party polling the highest number of votes in a con- 
tested race in the last county election and one member appointed from the party 
polling Ihe second highest number of votes in Ihe same election. The additional Board 
ol Review members consist of individuals appointed by the County Board to hear 
complaints In an emergency situation. 

To be eligible for appointment as a regular or additional member of the Board ol 
Review, a person mdst be a resident of Lake Counly, be qualified by experience and 
training in the field ol property appraisal and property tax administration, and have 
passed an examination prepared and administered by the Department of Revenue. 
Applicants may obtain an application, additional information and study materials by 
contacting the Board of Review office, 1B North Counly street. 8lh Floor, Waukegan, 
Illinois (phone 360-6610) weekdays between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 pm. CST. 
Completed applications must be returned to the Board of Review office no later than 
Monday, February 14, 2000, 

The examination and facilities will be accessible to disabled individuals in compli- 
ance with State and Federal laws; however, these individuals are asked to notify the 
Board of Review by Monday, February 14, 2000 to make any necessary arrange- 
ments. 

0100D-3128-GEN 
January 28, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE,,. 
PUBLISHER'S CERTIFICATE 
20333 

Account Number 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign sub- 
sidiaries and foreign branches of Hawthorn Bank located In Mundelein at the close 
of business December 31, 1999. 

Published In Response to Call of the OFFICE OF BANKS AND REAL ESTATE ol 
the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

1. Cash and balances due from depository Institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 2,678 

b. Interest-bearing balances • ■ 17 

2. Securities: 

a. Held-to-malurity securities 300 

b. Availabie-for-sale securities 8,521 

3. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to 

resell ." 1,050 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned Income 42,695 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 377 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve 

d. Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance 

and reserve (item 4.a minus 4.b and 4,c) 42,318 

5. Trading Assets '..... 

6. Premises and lixed assets (including capitalized leases) 1 ,570 

7. Other real estate owned 167 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries & associated companies . 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 

11. Other assets 527 

12. Total Assets (sum ol items 1 . through 11) 57,148 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic ollices 51 ,654 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 6,700 

(2) Interest-bearing 44,954 

b. In foreign offices, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBFs ... 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) interest-bearing 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under 

agreements to repurchase 650 

15. a. Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury 

b. Trading liabilities 

16. Other borrowed money (includes mortgage Indebtedness 
and obligations under capitalized leases); 

a. With remaining maturity ol one year or less 

b. With remaining maturity ol more than one year through 

three years v 

c. With a remaining maturity of more than three years 700 

17. Not applicable 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Subordinated notes and debentures 

20. Other liabilities 229 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 Ihrough 20) 53,233 

22. Not applicable 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred slock and related surplus 

. 24. Common stock : • 1,022 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus related to preferred stock) 3,163 

26. a. Undivided prolils and capital reserves (123) 

b. Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-tor-sale securities (147) 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustments 

28. Total equity capital (sum of items 23 Ihrough 27) 3,915 

29. Total liabilities, equity capital, and losses deferred 

(sum of items 21 and 28) 57,148 

I, Erich Laumer, Vice President, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify lhat 
this report ol condition is correct and complete to the best of my knowledge and 
belief. 

Correct * Altesl: Gregory S. Kobus 

Christopher A. Gatty 

John M. Heinz 

0100D-3126-MN 

January 28, 2000 





January 28, 2000 




■ 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 5 



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. Kobus 
C Galty 
I. Heinz 
126-MN 
8, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby gtven by the 
Board of Education of School District 
No, 24, in the County of Lake, Stale of 
Illinois, that a Public Hearing will be 
held on the Issue of a Waiver Request 
for exemption from the Limitation of 
Administrative Costs as established 
by Section 17-1 .5 of the School Code. 

Notice is further hereby given that 
a public hearing on this Issue will be 
held at 7 p.m. on the 21st day of 
February, 2000 at Millburn School. 

Dated this 19th day of January, 
2000. 

Board of Education of Millburn C, C. 
School District No. 24 
18550 Millburn Road 
Wadsworth, IL 60083 
Submitted by: James Menzer, Ed. D., 
Superintendent 

1st James Menzer, Ed.D. 

Superintendent 

0100D-3119-WD 

January 28, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS; Schratwieser 

Consulting 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Administrative . 
and Computer Consulting 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
JS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 131 B N. 
Poplar, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
(847)740-8091. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- , 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Klmberly A. Schratwieser, 1318 N. 
Poplar, Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 
(847)740-8091. . 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatioti(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are conect as shown. 
IsJ Klmberty A. Schratwieser 
January 7, 2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the- busi- 
ness this 7th day of January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

IsJ Veronica L. Michelau 

Notary Public 

Received: January 13, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100C-3116-RL 

January 21,2000 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Millennium 

Muses 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Investment Club 
(purpose see mission statement) 
ADORESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1508 
Vineyard Drive, Gurnee, IL 60031. 
(847) 223-3368. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
JIM M. Dolan, 1508 Vineyard Drive, 
Gurnee, IL 60031 (847) 223-3368; 
Sally Evans, 416 N. Kennicott, 
Arlington Hts„ IL 60005; Ginger 
Fruhwirth, 17438 W. Walnut Lane, 
Gumee, IL 60031; E, Lynn Lanoue, 
1660 Thackar, Des Plalnes, IL 6001; 
Elisa A. Bartashevich, 4548 Covenant 
Court, Gurnee, IL 60031; Denfse L. 
Williams, 14105 Oak Knoll Road, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083; Edward G. 
Oilschlager, 14105 Oak Knoll Road, 
Wadsworth, IL 60083, Diane L. 
Fasano, 6779 E. Mt. Vernon Ct., 
Gurnee, IL 60031. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locallon(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
dueling or transacting ihe business 
is/are conect as shown. 
Isl Jill M. Dolan, January 12, 2000. 
IsJ Sally Evans, January 12, 2000. 
/s/ Ginger Fruhwirth 
January 12, 2000. 

fsJ E. Lynn Lanoue, January 12, 2000. 
/s/ Elisa A. Bartashevich 
January 12, 2000. 
IsJ Denise L. Williams 
January 12,2000. 
IsJ Edward G. Oilschlager 
January 12, 2000. 
7s/ Diane L Fasano 
January 12, 2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness Ihls 12th day of January, 2000. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
IsJ Kalherlne E. Sumners 
Notary Public 
Received: January 13, 2000 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Cterk 
0100C-3115-GP 
January 21, 2000 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS ' 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS; Ultimate Shine 

Cleaning Service 

NATURE/PURPOSE: House Cleaning 
Service ■' 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 77 Mariner 
Lane, Fox Lake, IL 60020 (847) 587- 
4169. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Karyn Prasll, 77 Mariner Lane, Fox 
Lake, IL 60020 (847) 587-1356. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
Is/ Karyn Prasll 
January 7, 2000 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending (o conduct the busi- 
ness this 7th day ol January, 2000. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

IsJ Maureen K. Stolarik 

. Notary Public 

Received: January 1 1 , 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100C-3118-FL 

January 2 1,2000 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Michael 

Lescher, D/B/A "Your Link To The 

Chain" 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Realtor 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 532 W. 
Lake St., Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 395- 
3000 Ex. 133. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Michael Wm. Lescher, 532 W. Lake 
St., Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 395-3000 
Ex.133. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locaiion(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of (he person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
IsJ Michael Wm. Lescher 
January 18, 2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 1 8th day of January, 2000. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

IsJ Kimberly A. Aredia 

Notary Public 

Received: January 20, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100D-3124-AN 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF. BUSINESS: Universal 

Transportation 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Transportation 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED. IN THIS COUNTY: 1724 
Grove, North Chicago, IL 60064. (847) 
507-3565. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Mateen Ahmad, 1724 Grove, North 
Chicago, IL 60064, 507-3565. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is to certify that the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that the' (rue or real, full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
/si Mateen Ahmad 
January 7, 2000 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 6th day of January, 2000. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Andres A. Cerritos 

Notary Public 

Received: January 6, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

• 0100B-3106-LB 

January 14, 2000 

January 21, 2000 

January 28, 2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: The Newborn 

Network 

NATURE/PURPOSE; Electronic Birth 
Announcements 

'ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1193 
Pope's Creek Circle, Grays lake, IL 
60030. (847) 548-6537. 
NAME(S) AND POST. OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Christopher W. Urban, 1193 Pope's 
Creek Cirde, Grayslake, IL 60030. 
(847) 548-6537. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(a) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Isl Christopher W. Urban 
January 21, 2000. 

The foregoing instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 21 st day of January, 2000. 



OFFICIAL SEAL 

IsJ Dana Krapl 

Notary Public 

Received: January 21 , 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100D-3123-GL 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: D & W 

Automotive 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Automotive 
Repair 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 284 Main 
Street, Antioch, IL 60002. (847) 838- 
1395. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Wendy Hushmlre, 4408 N. Oak Park 
Ave, Harwood Heights, IL 60706. 
(708) 867-5447. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 
This Is lo certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location (s) indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) ol the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. 
IsJ Wendy Hushmire 
January 20, 2000. 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 20lh day of January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Is/ Dana Krapf 

Notary Public 

Received: January 20, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100D-3120-AN 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

February 11,2000 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Thomas G. 

Miller, Architects 

NATURE/PURPOSE: Architectural 
Design 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 21621 
Wilmar Avenue. Grayslake, IL 60030- 
1033.(847)223-5443. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Thomas G. Miller, 21621 Wilmar 
Avenue, Grayslake, IL 60030-1033. 
(847) 223-5443. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
is/are correct as shown. . 
/s/ Thomas G.Miller 
January 22, 2000. ,. 

The foregoing Inslrument was 
acknowledged before me, by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 22nd day of January, 2000. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

IsJ Jane E. Hall 

Notary Public 

Received: January 24, 2000 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0100D-3125-GL 

January 28, 2000 

February 4, 2000 

February 1 1 , 2000 



FROM PAGE CI 



THELEN 



people who would use the trail 

"I don't know what this will do to 
the amount of people visiting. the; 
area," said Martini. "And I don't 
know what this will do to the natural 
resources and endangered species 
that are in the Gander Mountain 
Preserve." 

The other Thelen' mine, located 
at Rte. 173 and Wilmot Rd., is, plan- 
ning a 330-acre expansion eastward 
that would border the Village of Fox 
Lake. 

Martini is disputing the annexa- 
tion, arguing that the placement of 
the industrial site violates the resi- 
dential zoning of the areas around it 

She believes the mining opera- 
tion would cause problems with 
well water, decrease property values, 
increase truck traffic and cause 
more air and noise pollution. 

In the Wilmot scenario, these 
sorts of problems could damage the 
natural surroundings of the Gander 
Mountain area. 

However, there are two factors 
that could change the fate of Wilmot 
Mountain, and the fate of the Lake 
County preserve, as well. 



At the moment, the ownership 
of Wilmot Mountain is in question. 
After owner Diane Reese filed for 
federal bankruptcy protection in 
December, Steven and Jeannette 
Schwarzbach of Twin Lakes Wis. 
claimed that they had a written con- 
tract purchase agreement before 
Thelen began negotiating with 
Reese. 

The Schwarzbach's claim that 
Thelen was in violation of state law 
when they offered a higher bid after 
the contract. 

The couple has filed a lawsuit to 
stop Reese from selling the moun- 
tain to the gravel company. 

There has also been reports that 
Thelen does not plan to turn the 
mountain into a mine, but instead 
continue to run skiing operations. 

According to Martini, a person 
related to the company said Thelen 
had no Intention of destroying the 
ski hill. 

Martini would like more assuar- 
nace than that. . 

"We'd like to know what their 
game plan is," . commented 
Martini. 



STUDENT 



trict Voice of Democracy chairman 
and chairwoman Walter and Lydia 
Michalski, of Round Lake Post 9649. 

The Voice of Democracy contest 
was open to high school students' 
who were asked to record a three to 
five minute essay on the theme, 
"America's Role for the Next 
Century." * 

A total of 16 posts, 19 schools, 
and 201 students participated in the 
contest 

The Fifth District spent over 
$19,000 on scholarships and awards 
this year, noted Michalski. 

The first place winner, from 
Antioch Sequoit Post 4551 and 
Ladies Auxiliary, was Jourdan L 
Phillips, who received $400. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
TOWNSHIP BUDGET 
Notice is hereby given that a ten- 
tative Budget and Appropriation 
Ordinance for Antioch Township in the 
County of Lake, State of Illinois, for the 
fiscal year beginning February 1 , 2000 
and ending January 31, 2001 will be 
on file and conveniently available to 
public Inspection at the Antioch 
Township Office, 99 Route 173, 
Antioch, Illinois from and after 8:30 
a.m T on February 7, 2000. 

Notice is further given hereby that 
a public hearing on said budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance will be held 
at 7:40 o'clock p.m. on the 9th day of 
March, 2000 at the antioch Township 
Office, 99 Route 173. Antioch, Illinois 
In this Township and the final action on 
the Ordinance will be taken at this 
hearing. 

Is/ Kathleen M.Smith 

Antioch Township Clerk 

January 25, 2000 

0100D-3129-AN 

January 28, 2000 



Phillips is a resident of 
Lindenhurst and an Antioch High 
School senior with aspirations to 
attend the University of 
Pennsylvania after graduation. 

"I honestly didn't think I'd win. I 
figured it wouldn't be me," she said. 

As the Fifth District winner, 
Phillips will compete in the state 
competition in Springfield on Feb. 
12. 

If Phillips wins first place at the 
state competition, she will receive 
$2,000 and an all-expense paid trip 
to Washington D.C. to compete in 
the nationals, where she will have a 
shot at a college scholarship worth 
$26,000. 

"I'm very proud because she 
made the effort,'' said her father, 
Paul Phillips. 

"When she puts her mind to 
something, she completes what she 
starts," he said. 

The second place winner, from 
Wauconda Post 2486, was Sheryl L 
Swanson, who received $300. 

The third place winner, from 
Woodstock Post 5040 and Ladies 
Auxiliary, was Justin D. Ryman, who 
received $200. 

The fourth place winner, from 
Carpentersvtlle Post 5915 and 
Ladies Auxiliary, was Nancy M. 
Godinho, who received $100. 

All 17 contestants received a 
certificate of merit from the VFW, a 
Voice of Democracy pen, A VFW 
100th anniversary coin, VFW pin, a 
•VFW poppy puppy bean bag animal 
and a U.S. flag donated by 
Congressman Phil Crane. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

NOTICE OF 5-YEAR LEASE OPPORTUNITY 

FOR OPERATION OF A CONCESSION FACILITY 

CHAIN O'LAKES STATE PARK 

LAKE & MCHENRY COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 

Sealed bids are requested by the State ol Illinois, Department of Natural 

Resources, for the operation of a concession under a five-year lease providing for 

boat rental, the sale of food, drinks, fishing, camping, picnic supplies, hunting and 

fishing licenses, and winter sports. 

Complete information, Including a Prospectus and Bid Forms for the concession, 
may be obtained from the office of the Site Superintendent, Chain O'Lakes State 
Park, 8916 Wilmot Road, Spring Grove, IL 60081, in the Counties ol Lake and 
McHenry, Stale ol Illinois, or by contacting the Concession and Lease Office at (217) 
782-0179. 

A mandatory prebid meeting will be held at 9 a.m. on February 9, 2000 at Ihe office 
of the Site Superintendent at Chain O'Lakes State Park. 

Bids will be received at the Department of Natural Resources, Division ol 
Concession & Lease Management, 524 South Second Street, Room 610, Springfield, 
Illinois 62701-1787 until 2 p.m. on March 1, 2000, at which time all bids will be pub- 
licly opened and read. 

The State of Illinois, Department of Natural Resources, reserves Ihe right to reject 
any and all bids. 

The Department of Natural Resources shall not unlawfully discriminate on the 
basis of race, color, sex, national origin, age, or handicap in admission to, or treat- 
ment or employment In programs or activities, 

Tracey Blackburn 
Concession & Lease Management 
0100C-3112-FL 
January 21, 2000 
January 28, 2000 
February 4, 2000 



■p 



* 



( 




.C 1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 2Q } 2000 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below are real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area. Listed are the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antioch 

42192.5th Av, Ronald E Wilfert, 
$120,000 

39902 Golf Rd, Richard E & Rose- 
mary E Rasmussen, $129,000 
43022 Lake Av, Federal National 
Mortgage Assoc , $75,000 
43022 Lake Av, Ramonita Almod- 
ovar, $75,000 

603 Ridgewood Dr, Daniel G De- 
roche, $228,500 

26044 W Spring Grove Rd, Trust 
99122 State Bank Of The Lakes An 
Illinois Co, $385,000 
Fox Lake 

36 Lippincott Rde, Vicki Collins, 
$114,000 

73 White Oak, Kathy Dwyer, 
$108,000 
Gravslake 

560 Arlington Ln, Daniel Mcgovern, 
$220,000 

1156 Blackburn Dr, Adenola E 
Akala, $150,000 

2318 Carillon Dr, Mildred Weldon, 
$253,622 

955 Mckay Cir, Douglas Rallo, 
$128,000 

837 N West Tr North, Michael W 
Rynex, $220,000 
837 North West Tr, Maria Rojas, 
$220,000 

202 Siwiha, Daniel & Stephanie 
Herbek, $143,500 
34366 Tanqueray Dr, Christopher 
Eutkowski, $272,000 
Green Oaks 

14121 Spring Creek Ct, Richard D 
Hoffman, $416,373 
Grange 

7281 DadaDr, Walter Boddie, 
$285,000 

686 Dunham, Joann J Gentilini, 
$177,500 

383 Kingsport Dr, Harold A Meniw, 
$299,494 



399 Kingsport Dr, Kristine Paulson, 
$275,740 

6131 Oakmont Ln, John Walsh, 
$347,290 

504 Old Walnut Cir, Manju Manwal 
& Pratik Shrivastav, $377,850 
930 Taylor Dr 109, Edward Chrap- 
kowski, $85,000 
80 Wiltshire, Marc Huntley, 
$135,000 

3725 Woodlawn Av, Alfonso Ba- 
hena, $181,000 
Hainesville 

167 Cranberry Lake Dr, Janice Carl- 
son, $141,208 

237 Cranberry Lake Dr, William J & 
Judith C Degnan, $175,053 

582 Holiday Ln, Kelly AQuinn, 
$139,361 

583 Holiday Ln, Vladimir Rosen- 
baum, $142,856 

584 Holiday Ln, Michael & Lisa 
Richberg, $135,600 

124 N Stillwater Dr, Mark R & Tere- 
sa GSuski, $192,266 
1 66 N Stillwater Dr, Robert A & Lori 
Ray, $196,700 
Hawthorn Woods 
47 Darlington Dr, Ted & Sharon Pa- 
pielweski, $258,000 
68 Falcon Dr, Robert Hoffman, 
$452,000 
In gleside 

6280 N Tara Ct, David F Scherrer, 
$211,000 
Lake Villa 

602 Benton Rd, Scott R Hebner, 
$153,817 

38683 Deep Lake Rd, Robyn 
Bradley, $68,250 
36538 Elizabeth Dr, James M 
Campbell, $106,000 
2101 N Heartland Path, The Secre- 
tary Of Housing ,$183,990 
2169 N Millstone, Scott Nelson, 
$149,000 



748 Southwind Dr, Paul R.Collins, 
$209,900 

24985 W Forest Dr, Salvatore G Ter- 
ranova, $170,000 . 
LlbertwiHe 

1901 Forest Creek Ln, Kevin B 
Weller, $285,000 
623 Golf Rd, Sajan Chako, 
$225,000 

1 125 Jaimee Ln, Alejandro & Ali- 
cia Hurtado, $476,995 
1609 Nathan Ln, Keith & Kather- 
ine Murphy, $439,968 
441 W Torrey Pines Way, Gerlad 
& Christina Grobman, $723,223 
629 Wrightwood Terr, Sharon 
Gurry, $500,000 
Undenhurst 

1716 Fairfield Rd, Rosa M Contreas, 
$135,000 

2907 Falling Waters Ln, Lilian Ol- 
son, $157,470 

2257 HighpointDr, Charles Carl- 
borg, $199,900 

59 St Marys Ln, Irwin K & Judith 
Goldman, $259,155 
123 Tamarack Ct, Betty Behrens, 
$145,294 
Mundelein 

1250-e Ballantrae, Liliya Lyandres, 
$108,000 

1233 Ballantrae PI, Susan M Berg, 
$117,000 

2051 Chadwick Way, Salvatore & 
Linda LPrato, $328,580 
1317 Derby Ln, Jacqueline J 
Koehler, $185,000 
113 Knightsbridge, Laex& Emerita 
Musni, $202,000 

164 N Prairie, Martin Olmos &Ar- 
turo Olmos Flores, $122,500 
234 Stafford Dr, Rick G & Denise G 
Cote, $173,000 

555 Woodcrest Dr, Jeffrey R Miller, 
$121,500 
Round Lake 

21 10 Columbine Ct, Anthony C 
Wiltshire Fowler, $180,504 
443 Finch Dr, Russell O Hoeppner, 
$177,866 

1965 Marigold Ln, Julia E Donavant, 
$213,104 




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34165 N Goldenrod Rd, Gregory M 
Cameron & Tanya Behrens, 
$194,911 

31 North Channel Dr, Raed B Sulie- 
man, $150,000 

277 WTreehouse Ln, Matthew J 
Rendl, $105,fi00 
Round Ijuke Beach 
130 E Wildflower Ln, Anthony B 
Cox, $180,000 

1512 Hainsville Rd, William Moore, 
$131,000 

1609 Juneway Terr, Ismael Mar- 
quez, $129,900 

2255 N Aster PI, Derrick S & Katina 
C Owens, $189,000 
1321 N East End, Roger D& Julie A 
Thomson, $1 17,500 
2257 N Essex Ln, Jerome A Rung Hi 
& Debra L Rung, $165,600 
2269 N Essex Ln, Christopher L 
Bradley, $180,870 
2274 N Essex Ln, Kevin A & Betdi 
Bel), $189,640 

1033 1 N Village Dr, Sandra K Opsal, 
$97,725 

1037 3 N Village Dr, Rebecca Lee 
Westley, $95,480 

1 151 1 N Village Dr, Michael J Bro- 
ker Hi, $100,135 
1 175 2 N Village Dr, Linda Wallace, 



$93,900 

463 Strattford Ln, Edward D 
Moscatelli; $157,000 
209 W Hawthorne, Agustin Garcia, 
$99,000 

1207 Woo dridge, Craig P Meyers, 
$93,500 

1207 Woodridge, Craig P Meyers, 
$93,500 

Round Lake Heights 
2386 N Ojibwa, Lawrence L & Maria 
A Pebenito, $147,795 
2451 N Ojibwa, Gary & Kari A Bend- 
feldt, $147,575 

657 W Ottawa, William Sullivan By- 
ers, $160,900- 
Round Lake Park 
17 E Lake Shore Dr, Rafael Aquilar, 
$114,000 
Wadsworth 

2853 N Augusta Dr Jennifer M ' 
Paull, 3129,072 

2871 N Augusta Dr, Alexander J 
Speirs, $177,180 
Wnuconda 

440 N Main St E 204, Thomas Jahr, 
$130,000 

433 Oak Grove Cir, Edward J & Nan- 
cy A Skarda, $340,589 
28200 WMain St, Michael M & Eliza- 
beth Morris, $355,000 



Japanese film 'Tokyo Drifter' 
to be screened February 11 



The motion picture "Tokyo 
Drifter," directed by Seijun Suzuki 
will be shown at 7 p.m., Feb. 11 in 
Room D100 as part of the College of 
Lake County's international film se- 
ries. 

Admission is free, but it should 
be noted that the film contains 
adult content and is not suitable 



for children. 

CLC film instructor Pat Gonder 
describes this offering as "a gangster 
film that showcases Suzuki's trade- 
mark barrage ofaestheticized vio- 
lence, visual gags and mind-warping 
color effects." 

Call Gonder at 543-2555 for fur- 
ther information. 



FROM PAGE CI 



ZGONINA 



be leading a large group of Like 
Countians to the big game. They 
have not missed one of Jeffs games, 
"except for the time when his sister 
was running in the Chicago 
Marathon and asked for equal time," 
said Ginger Zgonina. All Carmel stars 
who have gone on to professional ca- 
reers have been good to the school, 
officials say; 

"Jeff has donated a lot of equip- 
ment to us," said current athletic di- 
rector and football coach Andy Bitto. 
"He comes back and works out over 
the summer. He did not grow during 
high school, but he was so strong it 
was amazing. In college, he could 
bench press 575 pounds." 

Bitto coached Zgonina while a 
defensive coordinator Zgonina's two 
varsity seasons. Carmel was 5-4 both 
years. His accolades include all-state 
and all-East Suburban Catholic Con- 
ference. He would later be the all de- 
fensive player of the year in the Big 
Ten at Purdue. 

"His first year, he was unbeliev- 
ably huge and fast. Teams would run 
their offense away from him," said 
Bitto, "In college, they did not run at 
him at all." 

"He is such a great guy. I'm so 
happy for him to be in the pros for 
seven years it is hard. He comes from 
a family with a great work ethic with 
his mom and dad and two sisters," 
said Fitzgibbons. 

Coaches said they "knew right 
away" this football player from Long 
Grove would be special. Zgonina 
played hockey and baseball as a 
youth. He played basketball as a 6- 
foot, 4-inch forward until his junior 
year. He did not play football until he 
reported at Carmel. 

■ After CHS, he was originally go- 
ing to play football at the University 
Illinois. But the day he planned to 
sign his national letter of intent to go 
to Champaign, Illinois head coach 
Mike White was fired. White is now 
on the staff with Dick Vermeil and 
the Rams, 

"They joke about that now," Bob 
Schroeder, a long-time friend, said. 

The Zgonina household in Bar- 
rington Hills is complete with jerseys 



and memorabilia from his career— * 
the Pittsburgh Steclers (who origi- 
nally drafted him) Carolina Panthers, 
Indianapolis Colts, Oakland Raiders, 
and an earlier stint with the Rams. 

"He is shocked he has been able 
to play this long," said Ginger. 

He could have selected the 
Chicago Bears in 1999, but his Rams' 
career was still fresh in the memory 
of Vermeil and his staff. 

Although growing up watching 
the Bears in Soldier Field and Bear 
weather, No. 90 has adjusted well in 
the heated TWA Dome. "It is nice 
traveling when you don't have to 
bring mittens and gloves. We have a 
lot of relatives in southern Illinois 
who come to the games. 

Zgonina's life will be altered next 
summer. He will marry his girlfriend, 
Camie Bogley, whom he met during 
his playing days in Pittsburgh. 

Zgonina spends his free time on 
hunting trips in Missouri. 

The team has much latitude un- 
der Vermeil, including sleeping in 
their own beds the night before * 
games. 

While QB Kurt Warner and Isaac 
Bruce and other stars get the public- 
ity, Zgnonia gets his share, too. His 
duties on successful kickoff returns 
help get him noticed. 

"Jeff has a superfan who wears 
the No. 90 jersey to each game. When 
we were tailgating with Jeffs family, 
he came up to us and Jeffs mom who 
asked him to come over and meet 
Jeff. When he saw Jeff, he asked to see 
his brother. Now he comes up to us 
after every game," Schroeder re- 
called. 

The Zgoninas may look forward 
to another family member coming 
through the Carmel ranks. Ed Mirski, 
Jeffs cousin, will be a freshman at 
CHS next fall. Jeffs b.rother-in-law, 
Frank Kmet, played college football. 
Jeff stays in touch with his family, in- 
cluding his grandfather, who watch- 
es games on TV. 

No doubt, the VCRs will be hum- 
ming in the Barrington Hills neigh- 
borhood and at homes of many of 
-Zgonina's friends at approximately 
5:10 p.m. Jan. 30. 



1 



' • 



January 28, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C1 7 




lai%ificd iamfuici 



A 



rniauttcctticiiti 

aikviwKiffiWWm'tco. - 

Notices . . . lip 

l.osl A Found .1 1 5 

Free .120 

I'ci muiliIs t 1 25 

Auction!! ,■• * * • ... 1 30 

I Justness tVrsoimls 1 35 

tfiiiiiiciiil 140 

H»inploijmertl 

Help WuiilcrJ I'.in-'niin.- . "...,'.'.... '".219 

Help Wanted Full-Time .220 

liinployineui Agencies 221 

" Business Opportunities 225 

Siiuiitiptis Wanted 228 

Child Care .240 

Scltotit/liisirtiction ■ . . . 250 

JVlnrUci (mmj utile 

Antiques ........ 301 

Appliances' ......... 304 

Uarler/Tradc 30K 

lla/aars/CrjIls . ." .310 

lliiihlinu Material 314 

Business/Office lii|uipinenl 318 

Klccirunics/Coinputers 320 

Farm Guide , . . 324 

Firewood .' 328 

(lamec/ltiimnuiue Sales 330 

( i«hhI 'lliiuus 'In Hal 334 

I Imscs ,* lack 338 

llimsehnld riiHiils/Fiin'iliute .340 

Jewelry .344 

I.;iwii/C inrden 348 

I'lultiitii: : 340 

Miscellaneous 350 

Medical lupii|i/Supp(ics .' ■ 354 

Musical liislrunieuls 358 

I Vis it Supplies 360 

Keslauraiil lupiipuieiil . . , ; 364 

Tools * Machinery ......... , . .368 

Wauled 'lh lluv 370 



Z^crit di 



HniiiLs Fur Sale 500 

I luines For; Keiil 504 

llotiies Wauled 508 

Jinnies lluildeis 510 

('<iiido/Touu Homes 514 

Mobile Homes " 518 

Apartments Ftir Keni 520 

Apartments Wattled 524 

Apt/Homes To Share 528 

Koouis K»r Kent 530 

lluildinjis : 533 

Itusiness I'rnpeily Fur Sale 534 

llusiness I'mpcity For Kent 538 

Investment I'rupetty .**.' 540 

Mortifajie Services . . . . ' 544 

l-arms " 548 

Vacant l.ois/Acreaee 560 

lU'siiris/Vaealion Uenials 564 

Dul C)| Area I'ropcriy MiK 

Cemetery l.ois 570 

Ileal lisiale Wauled 574 

lttr.il lislule Mise 578 



Z^et 



TctetiUotutl 

Keciealional Vehicles .' . .704 

Sntivvmobitcs/ATVs 708 

Iloats/Moiors/Fie. 710 

Camping 714 

Travel/ Vacation 718 

Sports liipiipment 720 

Airplanes 724 



tmtitporlttttati 



Cais For Sale 

Uculul/Lcascs 

Classie/Autii|iie Cars 
Services %% I'arls . . . 
Car I .nuns/Insurance 



ins 



804 

808 

810 

814 

818 

824 

Four Wheel Drive/ieeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers • -834 

Heavy Eimipnicnl 838 

Moioi cycles 844 

Wauled To liny 848 

Appliances Repair ....; S03 

Hlacklop S06 

Builders . . • .-WW 

C.upcntiy ' SI2 

Carpel Cleaiiiilii 1*15 

Coucn'te/Ceineiil . SIX 

Dry WjiII ......: S21 

lUlitcutioii/liistrueiioii ***-•* 

Fleclncal • S27 

l : irev,twHl • S30 

I liindyiiuu) . S33 

Heiiiinp/Air ('lii'iliitfoVtliig *»3fp 

I lousekeepiuji • • • ■ • -S3 y 

landscaping 

Lutiiidry/C'lcaniiiu 



.S45 
.S48 

SSI 
.S54 
.S57 

S00 
.Sf.3 

S06 



Legal Services 

Medical Services 

Movin^/SlorJee • • 

I'.iiiiiuij,' Dcconiiing 

I'aruleeal/iypiiii: Services • 

I'liiinlnnc .., 

Fools 

Pressure Washing - s * f »'> 

Professional Services • S72 

RudiarTV Repair S75 

Remodeling . • ^^ R 

Resumes - ^8 ' 

RiKilrne/Siding SJU 

S87 

• S«0 

\.[[ S93 

[ soo 

S99 



Storage 



Trces/I'hmls . 
Wedding .... 
Miscellaneous 



& 



istritution 



Kenosha 
County 



Kenosha 




Johntburo 



McHonry 



Crystal 
Lake 



McIIcnry 
County 



S-— — Jound Like 



Gray slake 



Zlon 
£) Wadtwortti 



Gurnco . 



Island Lake 



Mundeloln 



iln \ 




Park 
,Clty 



Waukegani 



North 

n Chicago 

Oaks' 



Wauconda 



North 
Barrlngton Uka2urlch 

Klideer 



©Vernon . ubertyvPle . »*■ - . % > 
Hm « . Uka Forest V 



Barrlnglon 



Long 
Grove 



Highland Park 



Dcerflcld 



Palatine 
Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 



Nonhbrook 



Liikcland Newspapers' Classifieds Apjycar in 11 Newspapers! 

Anlioch News •Round take News • Lake Villa Record 

Mundclein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslakc Times 

Fox Lake Press • Guniee Press • LindcnhiirsCNcws 

Wauconda teader • Libcrt\Tillc News 



HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 



BY CALL 

PHONE (847)223-8161 

py Lakeland Newspapers 
AAA ii P.O. Box 268 

MAIL GrayslakeJL 60030 



IN 30 S.Whitney St. 

W PERSON Grayslake 



BY 
FAX (847)223-2691 





DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party...Wed. I Oam 
HOURS 

8am-8pm....... Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-5pm. Friday 



m 




aifirie 




a 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



110 


NoUccs 



115 



Lost & Found 



125 



Pcrronals 



219 



lid[> Warned 
Pan-Time 



219 



lldji Wantol 
Part-Time 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but it one should 

occur, please report it 

immediately as we can be 

responsible for the First two 

(2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD 



LOST FAMtLY DOQI Brown 
and white husky with blue 
eyes. Answers to Smokey. 
Lake Villa area. Missing since 
Thanksgiving. REWARDI 
(847) 356-694B. 

DID YOU FIND Someonea 
PET or Special Lost Artlcfe? 
Call Lakolond Newspapers 
Classifieds DepL, and get your 
results, FOUND ods are 
RUN FREE at Charge. Call 
(847)220-61 6t. 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

NEEDED 

$5000.00 Compensation- 

Healthy women, ago 20-33. need- 
ed to serve as anonymous egg 
donor*. Donors wilt be required to 
take medication, blood screening 
& undergo minor surgical proce- 
dure. We aro Interested In an eth- 
nic backgrounds. Multiple loctions 
available. II Interested call 
ARR 773-327-7315 
Sedan Inquiries Only 



120 



Free 



FREE PICK UP SERVICE. I 
will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, or outboard 
"motor FREE. Call (847) 
566-2819. 



LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

II you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847)223-2691. 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it lo your account, ail pay- 
ment* Tor your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

po Box aea 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL C0030-0208 



ATTENTION 
PET OWNERS 
WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR FREE/ 
GIVE AWAY COLUMN. 
If you must give up your 
pet, please consider these 
facts. 

'Free animal ads suggest 
that there is something 
wrong with the animal, or 
that It has no value. 
•Some people who re- 
spond to these free animal 
ads are not reputable and 
aro mora concerned about 
making a profit than the 
animal. 

•Charging a fee lo a poten- 
tial pet owner confirms the 
responsibility of pet owner- 
ship for an entire lifetime 
of that pet. For more infor- 
mation, please contact the 
Humane Society. 



ADOPT: LOVING, SE- 
CURE couple yearn to cher- 
ish your newborn. Expenses 
paid. Suzanne & Len toll free 
886-456-0480, 

ADOPTION - LET us be the 
loving and caring parents to 
guide your child through the 
world. Expenses paid. Call 
Anna: and Paul -all -800-396- 
5912. 

LOSE 20LBS FAST. 

Free Samples. 
S/Back Guaranteed. 

(630) 213-1072. 

YOUR CELL WILL 

TELL..Get The Best Supple- 
ments. Healthy Ufa Nutrition- 
ist, Independent Sharktee Dis- 
tributor, (847) 740-2557 order 
by phone possible or call for 
appointment. Ask for 15% Dis- 
count, 



SUMMER CAMP 
SUPERVISOR 

Supervise & train staff, 

plan activities, operate 

wtthin given budget 

8:30-1:00 each day. 

BAinEduc.orECE.CPR 

& Bret Aid Cert 51350/hr. 

Fax resume/call for appt. 

(847) 223-2819 Usa- 

Wlldwood Parle District 

Fax (847)223-2820 



HOMEWORKERS 

NEEDED 

$635 weekly 

processing 

mail. Easyl 

No experience needed. 

Call 1-600-652- 

8 72 6 
Ext 2020 24 Hr«. 



ELDERLY CARE- 

Provtded 24hra in my Gur- 
nee home. One phone call 
can save you SiOOO's & pro- 
vide belter care for your 
loved one. Certified CNA. 
Call (647) 855-2721 



■AtwiAruwmnnAT.Tn<viviri*rr i " — " 



SNOWPldW DRIVERS 
SPIMTdKS 

BOBCAT OWNERS OPERATORS 

Top Pay/ 

Plenty of work. Guaranteed hours. 
No wait for your money. Paid gas. 

(847) 27M747 



Lywj\w uwrji r i nnnArrYVYYrYYY*n -n ^ 



140 



Financial 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run al NO 
CHARGE! {We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161, exL140. 



110 


Notices 



Look Who la 



OVER IHE 



Jessica Murray 



M^ ud 30! 

Happy Birthday Jess! 

Costal Jan Joyce. Fbula. Lisa. Wendy S Mindy 



J2.500 VISA/MASTER- 
CARD UNSECURED! Guar- 
anteed approval!!! Bad cred- 
it/No credit OK! Includes full 
credit restoration. 23-year old 
company. Not a scam. 1-600- 
566-9099 ext 25 (SCA Net- 
work^ 

•"HOME LOANS" 4 PAY 
OFF ALL CREDITORS Re- 
duce' Mortgage rate and pay- 
ment HOME IMPROVEMENT 
LOANS INTEGRITY GUAR- 
ANTEED. Easy to qualify, 
100% FINANCING FREE 1 
HOUR PREAPPROVALS. 
CALL NOW 80064 1-0993. 

LOWER PAYMENTS! 

STOP late fees. Slop or re- 
duce interest Stop collector 
calls. FAMILY CREDIT COUN- 
SELING. Non-profit Christian 
Agency. RECORDED MES- 
SAGE 1-600-729-7964. 
www.famlivcredit.org 



LAW FIRM OF WYS0CKI & GOOCH NEEDS 

SECRETARY 
for p/t position. Could lead to f/L Some f/t 
vacation fill in. Legal experience not neces- 
sary, we train. Good secretarial skills are a 
must as well as previous .secretarial experi- 
ence. We can be flexible on days and hours. 
Call and ask for Debbie to schedule 
appt. (or interview (847) SZ6-0100 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



FIRE YOUR BOSS end 
WORK AT HOME Earn 
$500-S5000/mo. Call toll frea 
1-800-722-4285 or www.work- 
alhomenow.com 



HELP WAFTED 

Inside Sales Part-Time 

We're looking for a few good people! 

Would you like to be p.<rt of a dynamic ules and marketing team? 

Our busy classified telephone ules department is looking far a few 

tood people with a *imng customer-service orientation and good 

communication and sales skills. 

The qualifications for this position Include: 

• Sclf-conlld cncc and a nosilive altitude. 



! Commnnicaiion and nhonc skills. 



■ Timc-manjiK-mcnt and onjanizalional skills. 



' Sales skills 



I'ersiMencc and the ahiiHv 10 kindle rejection. 



initiative. 



«A sense of humor. 



« Customer-s ervice orientation. 



Problem-solvin i ; and dec ision-making 



1 Creativity. 



WORK FROM HOME 

S450t per month Part-time, 

$2,000+ per month Full-time. 

Free Information 

(262)591-4589 
www.cash9 1 1 .com/providence 



A desire to learn 



■ Ahililv lo work wilh others 



Sounds (ike you? Scnd'Fax us your resume. We can ofJcr a good 

starting salary, a generous commission plan and opportunities Tor 

iraining and advancement. Mother's hours available. 

Lakeland •Publishers. Inc. 

Attn: Classified Manager 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake. IL 60030 

Fax (847)223-2691 




mm 



"jjT t0 nd \r~-~t JX~ *r% m J nf^. 



C1 8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 28, 2000 



~A* 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



CHILD CARE CLASS 

FACILITATOR 

IT evening position. Must have an 
Associate's Degree In Early 
Childhood Education, Education or 
related field will) at least six «i) 
hours of credit In early childhood 
education. A minimum of one year 
child ore work experience 
rami red. For applicaiiun/informa- 
Uon call Human Resources at (847) 
543-2065; Tt)»# (847) 223-5615. 
COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 

19351 W. Washington St. 

Grayslake, IL 60D3CM 198 
EOE/AA 



Switchboard 
Operator 

Part Time 

Currently seeking candidates 
for a part time Switchboard 
Operator position. Candidate 
must lie detailed oriented and 
have excellent customer ser- 
vice experience, prior switch' 
hoard experience would he 
helpful. For confidential con- 
sideration send/fax resumes in 
Dcerpath Medical Associates, 
71 Waufcegan Rd, Lake Bluff, IL 
GOO-M/Fax: (8 17) 295-1517 or 
for more information contact 
Human lie-sources at 
(8-J7) 535-8080. EOE 



Can You Count? 



Looking for dependable 
people to count Inven- 
tory In retail stores. 

• Part-Time a.m. hours 

• Weird hours 

■ $9.00 to start 

• Must be 18 or older 

■ Access to Reliable 
Transportation 

CALL 



INVENTORY 

SPECIALISTS 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 

Call (847) 662-9277 



RECEPTIONIST 
Part Time 

Our beautiful and modern 
continuing cara eutiior In the 
Loka ViUn/Undonhurel area has a 
part-llmo position availablo 
working ovonlnas (4:30pm- 
7:30pm) and weekends. Outios 
tnctudo answorlnu busy switch- 
board and routing calls, greet- 
Ing/dirccdng visitors, data entry, 
typing, moll, and tiling. Qualified 

candid aios will hove 1-3 yrs 

rocoptlonisl oxp, typo 45+ wpm, 

and havo somo computer oxp. 

Call B47-356-4SS1 

or apply In parson: 

Victory Lakes 

Continuing Cara Comer 

1055 East Grand Avonuo 

Undanhurot, IL G0O48 eoe 



tMm-FAltrjJME 

School Bas 

Monitors/ 

Drivers Aides 



No weekend, 

holiday or evening 

hours required! 




W.0Q/HK 



1 Bring your kids 
to work optlonl 
I Paid Training 
I Paid Holidays 
I Paid Vacations 
I Annual Bonuses 
I Medical/Dental & Life Ins. 
I Tuition Aid up to SlSOO/yr 
I Various Shifts and hours 

Call today! 
847-244-1066 



TELEPHONE WORK 
• FROM HOME 



Scheduling pick-ups of 

discarded items for a 

well-known charity. 

• Pleasant personality 

• Flexible hours 

• Paid Weekly 

Reliability a musl! 

Please call 
(630)515-5766 



JfRyd 



er 



RECEPTIONIST 

The Perfect PT Positlonl 

Victory Lakes has a pan-tima ojuxirlu- 

rwy ovailatie in our Assisted Living 

Facjityi 9.im- lpm. Monday • Frntiy 

Yuul tin our Ironl-ine rcprcsenttfivc, 

pmttin j and divonu at visitors. 

answering oi roaring cafe, d.ii.1 

entry, typing, nwl nnrl Hng 

RfiC<?|iticrusl openenco is preterm) 

Good jihono prosonco and prdos- 

sion.il rtomeanor are essenfci) 

Benefits am v/alaUc Cii 
6M7-35W551 or npfty in person at 

Victory Lakes 

Continuing Care Center 

1055 East Grand Ave. 

Lindcnhurst.IL 60046 

, coerrvVdV 



Lake Villa Office 

We have 3 immediate openings. 

No experience necessary/will train. 

Mon -Thurs 5-8:30 pm/Sat 9-2 pm 

P/T & possibility for advancement. 

Hourly + Commission. 

Kevin 245-7500 



OOyouS-ite to 

TALK?!? 



(fOefl, we've <jol lue jo6 for uou I 



Lakeland Newspapers Is looking for 
outgoing people who are looking for a great 
part-time job. 

You will be selling new and renewal 
subscriptions to 1 1 different Lakeland 
Community Newspapers & doing other 
customer service related work. 
Hourly wage & bonus! 

Monday-Thursday 5:0O8:30pm 
Saturday 9am-2:00pm. 
Hourly rate + commission. 



For interview 
call Kevin 
847-245-7500 



<s 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




OFFICE 

CLEANER 

noodod at night. 

Couples 

encouraged 

to apply. 
S10/per hour 

(815) 344-0120 



WE NEED 

Plasma Donors 
Immediately. 

Garn$100lnthc lst2wks! 

For ir.ro or a ppt . call 

414-654-1366 



CLEANING 

SERVICE 

Woman wanted to work for 

cleaning service, 

5 mornings a week. 

Call 

(847) 223-0729 



Dental Orthodontic 

Assistant 

Wed, Fii, & occasional 

Mondays (or our 

Long Grove Office. 

Experience preferred, 

but will train. Call Karen 

847-634-6166 



RECEPTIONIST 
GENERAL OFFICE 



Part-Time 

wanted for Vernon Hills 

apl. complex. Ideal for 

students, homemakers 

and retirees. Hours are 

Moa, Wed., Fri. 

8:30am-5pm 

Please call Maria 

847-367-4504 

for more information. 



Receptionist/ 
Part-Time 

Kxriliii}- imvilinii m;lll;lli!i' fur ;i 
skillvil ncttHhiiilsi Inn urimlric 
If l< l)r|i;tr!riiLiil. QiiulitU'd nil- 
ililljllc musl be iilik- to pi inr i- 
ll«". JiiBpIl' innllijili' tasks, lull? 

u'uhI cmnnimunlrallnri ami sec- 

ri'l;irl;il skills anil he sililr In 

;nl.i|K in :i cliaii)<liit: "in k rnvt- 

rniiiiunl. i-'iir ruiiliikiilhil inn- 

siili'rnllim M'inl/f.i\ r (Minus lu: 

I)( iTji.iili Mcilii nl Assmlali-s 

Altn: Unman Id Miiim s 

71 Waiikfcaii Uu.nl 

UikclitnlT, ILWHM-I 

IK47-2'J5-I547l 

Oir inurr innirmatiim cimlacl 

lliniiaii Id-Miiirri". at 

(K47I5J5-K0KII EOK 



RECEPTIONIST 

Busy physician's office 
has an Immediate 

opening for a 
PT receptionist. 

Previous medical office 
experience preferred, 

but not required. 

Ability to speak 

Spanish a plus. 

Please fax or 

malt resume to: 

102 Center Street, 

Grayslako, IL 60030 

(847) 223-9878 



220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Tlme 



AIM HIGH CAREER oppor- 
tunities (or high school grads. 
K you're between 17-27 Ihe Air 
Force can prepare you (or a 
career In life. Benefits Include: 
High tech training, tuition as- 
sistance, medical and dental 
care, excellent pay. Up to 
$12,000 enlistment bonus for 
those who qualify. For an In- 
formation packet call 1-800- 
423-USAF or visit the Air Base 
at www.alrforce.com 



AREA REPS WANTED ISE 

provides training, travel oppor- 
tunities and part-time income 
for placement, supervision of 
exchange students and house 
families. Please call Jayno 1- 
000-291-6503. 



ASSEMBLY AT HOME. 
Arts, crafts, |ewelry. Also elec- 
tronics, sewing, typing In your 
spare time. GREAT PAYl No 
experience needed. Will train. 
1-600-591-1B60 ext. 3 
(24hra.).(SCA Network). 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmv 



220 



Help Wiuiii'ti 

Full-Time: 



BILLER EARN UP, TO 
$40K PER YEAR. Easy Med- 
ical Claims Processing. Train- 
ing provided, Compuler re- 
quired. No previous experi- 
ence necessary. Flexible 
hours. 886-660-6693, ext. 115 
(SCA Network). 

BUSINESS OWNERS. AC- 
CEPT major credit cards. 
Free setup. Absolutely NO UP- 
FRONT CHARGES. Regard- 
less of size, age. credit. 48 
hour setup. Increase sales. 1- 
800-908001 1 

DRIVER - ABSOLUTELY 

SO DOWN LEASE PUR- 
CHASE! $190 a week (or 24 
months. Be your own boss. 
Run regional or OTR. Call Bob 
Meyer 1-800-553-2778, ext. 
2839. 

DRIVER - COMPANY Driv- 
ers and Owner Operators. Call 
today and ask about our great 
new compensation and bonus 
packages. Boyd Bros. 800- 
543-8923 (OO'S call 800-633- 
1377). EOE. 

DRIVER COVENANT 
TRANSPORT 'Coast to 
coast runs "Teams start 35c- 
37c $1,000 sign-on bonus (or 
exp. co. drivers. For experi- 
enced drivers and owner op- 
erators 1-800-441 -4394. For 
graduate students 1-800-338- 
6428. 

DRIVER-OWNER OPERA- 
TORS MORE home time 
plus, onjoy 82 cents per mile, 
plates/permits, fuel card, work- 
ers comp, medical plan and 
more. We^also offer company 
discounts on repairs and (uel. 
Cardinal Freight Carriers 800- 
935-3131. www.cardlog.com 
EOE 

DRIVERS & CONTRAC- 
TORS - Now hiring for our 
flatbed and van division, 
$3,000 sign-on bonus (or 
teams, $1,500 sign on for so- 
los. Solo company drivers 
•Average $45,000 to $50,000 
•Lease purchase available 
'Paid medical, dental, vaca- 
tion, 401 K and much more. 
•Excellent pay package for our 
contractors. Call us today! BIT- 
TERROOT INTERNATIONAL 
SYSTEMS, LTD. Must havo 
lyr. JOTR experience, Class A 
CDL Company drivers: 888- 
245-5977, contractors 888- 
245-1773. 

DRIVERS > .MARTEN 
TRANSPORT, LTD. Marten 
Transport can pay you • *1 
year-29c *2 years 30c *3 
years-3lc *4 years-32c '5 
yoars-33e. Call 1-800-395- 
3331. 
www.marten.com 

DRIVERS - NEW 2K PAYl 
OTR: 6/rno. exp. - .30/cpm top 
pay - ,40/cpm. Regional: 
.36/cpm. Jump Start Lease 
Program. MS Canters 1-800- 
231-5209 EOE. 

DRIVERS - NO exp. needed. 
2 week CDL training provided. 
Earn $2B-32,000/yr. wilh full 
benefits. P.A.M. Transport. Toll 
Froe 1-877-443-8797 or apply 
on-line at www.olrdrlvers.com 

DRIVERS DO YOU WANT 
GUARANTEED HOME TIME? 
It's yours by calling: I -B00- 
247-8040. Smlthway Motor 
XPress. Eqrnlngs up to .39 
cents a mile. COMPLETE 
BENEFIT PACKAGE. 

www.smxc.com 

DRIVERS-REGIONAL 
DRIVERS NEEDED. Due to 
expansion of our fleet, Star 
Transport Is now hiring experi- 
enced OTR drivers. Full bene- 
fits, great home lime, good 
miles. Training available for 
limited experienced CDL-A 
drivers. For more Info call 1- 
800-548-6082 ext. 805. 

EARN UP TO 35K/YR. Work 
from home doing data entry. 
Will train. Computer required. 
Call toll free 877-209-7070ext. 
509. (SCA Network). 

EASYWORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

$500-$ 1.000 part-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For (roe Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envolope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Inglosldo, III. 60041. 

EMERGING COMPANY 

NEEDS Medical Insurance 
billing assistance Immediately. 
K you have a PC you can 
earn $25,000 to $50,000 an- 
nually, Call 1-800-291 -4083 
Dept. #107 (SCA Network). 



FREE SAMPLES 

Lose up to 30lbs. In 30 Days. 

$38 to Start. 

Dr. Recommended. 

All Natural. 
Call 1-888-893-861 0. 

INSURANCE 4 DAY work 
week. Leads, advances, 
$1,000/woek, statewide op- 
portunity, 5 people minimum. 
Call ASAP 1-600-252-2581. 

MEDICAL BILLING EARN 

excellent $$$ processing 
claims from home. Full training 
provided. Computer required, 
Call Medl Pros loll free. 1-888- 
313-6049 ext, 3128 ( SCA Net- 
work). 

POSTAL JOBS TO 

$18.35/hr. Inc. benefits, no ex- 
perience. For a pp. and exam 
info, call 1-800-813-3585, oxl. 
#4220. 8am-9pm, 7/days fds. 
Inc. (SCA Network). 



PUT YOUR COMPUTER 
TO WORKI $499+P/T- 
$8499+F/T. For free Informa- 
tion log onto www.hbn.com 
Use access code 5179 or 
phDne 800-298-6622 (SCA 
Network). 

SMITH TRANSPORT HAS 

new openings In the Midwest 
and OTR fleets. We have se- 
lect opportunities Including: 
COMPLETE BENEFIT PACK- 
AGE, 401 K PLAN, VACA- 
TION/HOLIDAYS. 1 year OTR 
experience. 23 years of age. 
CALL RECRUITING TODAY 1 - 
888-778-9770, M-F 8AM- 
BPM, S-S 8AM-5PM. 

START YOUR OWN BUSI- 
NESS. Sel your own schedule. 
Control your own income, soil 
from your home, at work, 
through fundraisers. Be an 
AVON REPRESENTATIVE 
call 888-942-4053. 



Customer Service 
GROWTH 

| means opportunity . . . 

The GwkI Hands (Viiplc Hjh: 

G<hnJ Sit« For Ynul Sun mov- 
ing In tin- right direction ovii if 
you arc banning, ciunglrtK. or 
nluminj; In the working world. 
With Altstalc, jtiu an adwncc 
In, your carwr and see ynur 
accomplishments rmnkil. 
• Customer Service 

Representative 
Arc you an experienced cus- 
miner focused associate, adapt- 
able lo change and ilirKini; In a 
fast-paced, leam environment? 
Previous Insurance Industry 
experience a definite plus. Pre- 
employment skills testing con- 
ducted as applicable. 

I • Data Entry 

I M'c hnv seu-rJ openings In our 

1 0aU Entry area (or experienced 
people Willi PC skills and a min- 
imum 30 wpm keyhoin) skills. 
Must be capable of Inputting 

| d-iu In a fast-paced emlmnmmi. 
And the good news doesn't stop 
. . . lie provide a competitive 

I salary, a broad range of benefits 

[Including Uic/ Medical/Denial 
plans, Pension & Profll Sharing, 
lullion reimbursement and 

I more. For consideration, please 
email: DBrown49alt5talc. 
com/ FAX (847) 247-7170) 
or mall resume lo: Human 
Resources (Indicate joh 

I lllle) ALLSTATE 
IIFE INSURANCE 
544 Utkcvlew Parkway 

Vernon lillts, IL 60061 

Allstate Is an Equal Opportunity 

Empluyer and we encourage 

Women, Minorities, Disabled 

and Veterans lo apply. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fiill-Timt: 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



xaphic 



We're looking for a 
"graphic designer" lojoiu our learn. 

Do yon hnvc.cxpcrlcncc 

with computers and graphic design 

programs? If you do, 

then we teach you the rest 

in tliis entry level position. 

[ Send your resume to NEAL TUCKER a(.j 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
L Grayslake, IL 60030 

c 

iorfaxto223-8810j 



I 



Check 
This Out! 

Positions Available For 






MANAGEMENT 



Want a rock-solid career with a company 
that's a leader & committed to your success? 
We offer 3 different management positions 
that fit your experience level. 

Mail or fax your resume to: 

676 Portage Ct. 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

Fax: 847-837-8981 



FULL AND PART 
TIME CASHIERS 



If you treat people right, they'll treat you 
right, too. At Speedway Super America, 
that's our philosophy. You'll find an atmos- 
phere that's supportive, friendly & even FUN. 
And we'll train you so you'll be comfortable 
right from the start. 
Stop and apply at any of these stores today! 

1550 Glen Rock, Waukcgan 

2932 Belvidere St., Waukegan 

2850 Skokie Hwy., North Chicago 

491 S. Rte. 83, Grayslake 

505 Townline Rd., Mundelein 




^ 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



m 



AutO 




«&. 



•? 



i^'^ta 



Keep thai New Year's 
Resolution. 



>■.-,' 



Here's your opportunity to enter 
a Corporate environment 



Why not consldor a career whom you can uso your technical skills and 
oxporlonco In an offico environment, with tho opportunity for career 
growth and ongoing training? 

If you havo auto toch training and/or experience, you can train to bo a 
sorvlco advisor with us. The position involves heavy phono contact with 
drivers and shops, diagnosing and authorizing service work on tho 
vohiclos. A ptoasant phone manner Is a must. 

For Immodiate consideration ploaso call Kathorlno at 047-699-7000 
oxt. 4802 or look In at our now facility at 38833 N. Sheridan Road near 
Sheridan & Wadsworlh, Beach Park, IL (near Zlon). 

WHEELS, INC 

666 Garland Place 

Des Plalnes, IL 60016 

Attn: Kathertne Baden 

Fax:847-391-9975 

e-mail: kbadcti(5)whcols.«ipi 

smoke free workplace 

eoe 




• 



January 28, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 











Lakeland Newspapers / C1.9: 



t .iW.,»*4wiB<: 




220 



Help Wanted •■■ 
Full-Time 



220 



llclpwantcd 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time • 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Long-term project for top company. Earn $12 hr, + 

large completion bonus: 0/T available. 

Call Larry (647) 816-8707 

- AOMIN SUPPORT 
Explore new opportunities! Top $$$, Word, Excel, 
P Point A 45 WPM. Call Larry (847) 816-8707 

DATA ENTRY 

Excellent employer needs your accuracy & happy 

attitude. Top SSS. Call Larry (847) 81 6-8707 



Security Officers Wanted 

We arc now recruiting professional security ofnccrs lo work In 

upscale estate, residential, school and commercial locations, Job 

may include shift work. Possession of a PEHC card is pre/erred, but 

not required. Immediate openings. Successful applicants will have 

to pass a background and fingerprint check. Valid driver's license 

and a high school diploma or equivalent. Interested 

applicants should pick up an application at 

Grayslakc filgli School 

400 N. Lake St. 

Grayslakc, IL 60030 or call 548-3757 

Equal opportunity cmploy>er. ; '. 



MaintenanceJTechniciaii 



Chicago Cutlery, Inc. has an immediate opening for a 
Maintenance Technician. Rcsponsibillilcs Include maintaining, 
modifying, repairing & rebuilding a variety of .complex plan! 
machinerj/equipmcnl Including electrical, mechanical & pneu- 
matic machines; planning & performing mainienancc operallons 
requiring a high degree of specially; making complex replacement 
parts; troubleshooting; ability to use complex hlucprinis/schcmal- 
ics and understand various machine specifications. 

The Ideal candidate must have a high school diploma or equiva- 
lent plus trade school training, minimum of 3-5 years hands-on 
cxpericnccJn Industrial maintenance, knowledge of and experi- 
ence with a variety of shop tools and their applications, manual 
dexterity, good hinil-eyc coordination, and ability lo lift up to 75 
lbs. Experience with computerized PM systems preferred. 

This full-time position offers competitive salary, bonus capability 

and comprehensive benefit package including medical, dental, life 

Insurance, 401 (k), pension, pd. vacation & holidays. 

Apply in person or mail/fax your resume 

including salnrv history to: 

Chicago Cutlery, Inc. 

441 W, Bonner Road 

Wauconda, 1L 60084 

Attn: HR Mgr/MJ 

Fax: 847-526-2154 

No phone calls please. Final candidate must pass drug screen. 

EOE 




How To 
Survive 

The Job 
Search 

By Nancy Sakol 

Q: Please help me with a problem I am having wilh my former employer. A 
week ago I was fired torn my |ob at (name withheld), for reasons I cannot 
believe. I have been employed for the past 6 weeks with a company I really 
liked. I leave for work every rooming at 7 to arrhe at 7: JO and have always 
been on time. I went to leave for work on Thursday morning that It had 
snowed the night before and while trying to get Into my car, I slipped on the 
Ice and fell, causing me to hurt my shoulder and back. I had my roommate 
drive me to the (hospital), (name withheld), because [ was In pain and wis 
asked a bunch of questions about my job when I arrived. Uhlle I was there 
I was examined and had x-rays lo see if ihere wis anydung broken. The doc- 
tor told me that I was bruised but that I his OX. He also told roe that I 
should lake the next few days oh* work so my back and shoulder could heal. 
The following Monday Iretumedloworkandtomy surprise I was called In 
lo the Personnel Department where I was tola thai I was no longer 
employed, t asked the reason why and they said dial the reason should be 
obvious including lie fad thai 1 had not reported lo work since llie 
Wednesday before. 1 was angry when I left because 1 (old them that I was 
under the Impression dial when the hospital asked me all those questions 
about my )ob, that ih ey were calling the company to tell them *iui had hap- 
pened since 1 was on my nay to work at the lime. The hospital called me 
twice and said the company is disputing the bills as they are not covered 
under Workman's Compensation. 1 have tried to call the company to tell 
ihem about my hospital bills but they are not returning any of ray telephone 
calls. How can I be sure that the company pays die bills? What should 1 do? 
Please hdp. D.D. - Round lake (vU Email). 

A: I really don't know who has been feeding you information, but hare you 
got the story wrong. Big wrong! First of all, In no way are you entitled to 
Workman's Compensation for an Injury thai happened wrtlle you were 
attempting to go to work. That is the first problem. The next is lhat you 
apparently wenl In to the hospital and somehow made the hospital believe 
that ihls was a work related Injury thereby causing the hospital to bill the 
company direct for your injuries sustained. Now as I understand ft, you have 
no personal Insurance since you were not eligible for the company group 
healih plan for another two months, therefore, leaving you with medical bills 
at the hospital which will be your obligation to pay. The company that 
released you has released you for failure lo report In to work or conlart 
them while you were absent. The Idea lhat you believe the hospital would 
have called your company to report your absence Is absurd. According lo . 
the hospital, you advised them when you arrived that this was a work rdal- 
ed Injury 1 would seriously suggest that you stop trying lo contact the com- 
pany who Is dearly appalled by your situation, and concentrate your efforts 
on contacting the hospital to see how you can make restitution before they 
file an Insurance fraud case against you. My advice lo you Is that you do It 
very soon. Then, when you are ail healed, 1 would concentrate your efforts 
of finding a new employer without using the former company as a reference. 
Thai loo would be a mistake. Good Lucid 

Send your Inquiries to our new website 
wwvy.iupcriorpersonnel.com 

Note: Nancy Sakol Is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel In Gurnee. 

Letters can be tent to Nancy Sakol 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 
. P.O. Box 260, Grayslakc, IL 60030 

PLACEMl@aol.com 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuliTime 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Time i, 



220 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

REPRESENTATIVE 




TELLER-SUPERVISORS |j 
PERSONAL BANKER 


Prior teller experience 

required.' Supervisory 

experience preferred. 

Please call to make appt. 

or apply In, person. 

State Financial Bank 

1509 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

LIbertyvllle, IL 

(847)680-1077 


Insurance 

Exp.P&CCSR 
w/pcrsonal Insurance 

background. 

Call (847) 295-3030 

Ask for Karen or 

George 



PRINTING 

LAS VEGAS, NV-Irnmed 
Openings. Las Vaga3 
Color Graphics, stale of 
the art print facility, needs 
40 Inch Komorl lead 
Pressman & Feeders, 
working Bindery Foreman, 
Mac Operators & CSRs. 
702-617-9000 



TEACHER 

Immediate opening for" 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

TEACHER. 

Adult Day Program. 
■ Small classrooms in 
Lake County. 

Contact 
Ml. St. Joseph. 

847-438-5050 



Barrett Business 
Services 

Some Computer Skills 
Dillnguil a Plus 



ON-SITE 

COORDINATOR 



Starting pay $10.00/hr 

fax resume to: 

815-758-4226 

or call 

815-756-5)499 

Ask for Pattv 



W««Wi 



I""" OLIVE GARDEN" 
VERNON HILLS 

r is now seeking to fill positions of: 

•Servers •Bartenders 
•Host/Hostess 

Instant benefits, apply in person. 

Olive Garden Italian Restaurant 

701 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
. Vernon Hills 
Ask for Ron or Brian 



Retail 






HIRING EVENT 

Friday, Januar y 28th 

FULL-TI 
MANAGEM 
TRAINEEgf 
Clerks 

Supervisors 



Jewd and Osco, the Midwest's 
#1 supermarket/drug chain, 
can get you started last 
on a healthy career. We are 
looking (or career minded 
Individuals with strong 
people, communication and 
organizational skills who have 
a customer service attitude. 



We will be 

INTERVIEWING & HIRING 

from 9am-4pm 

at the Illinois Depl. of Employment Security 

800 Lancer Lane • Grayslakc 

(located at the College of Lake County) 

Jewel-Gsco 



Pre-einploymmt drug wnrenln g required. EOE 




Engineering 
APPLICATIONS 
ENGINEERS 

Dana her Controls, a. Fortune 
500 company located In 
northern, IL, has Immed. 
openings for Applications 
Engineers due to an increase 
In business. You will assist 
customers & sales reps In the 
selection, installation A oper- 
ation of our products. 
Although most contacts arc 
by phone, occasional travel 
will be rcq'd. Candidate 
should possess excellent ver- 
bal/written communication 
skills w/gixxl understanding 
of electrical & mechanical 
principles as found In Indus-, 
trial machinery & processes, 
BS degree In Electrical/ 
Electronic engineering tech- 
nology in rcq'tl w/0-3 y f * 
exp. We olfer a competitive 
salary & full benefits pkg on 
your 1st day of erhplymt. 
Benefits Include medical, 
dental, vision, life, 401k, vaca- 
tion & holidays. Qualified 
applicants may send/fax 
resume w/salary rcq's to: 

Danahcr Controls 

167 Dclany Rd.Gurncc.tL 

60031, or Fax: (8 17) 662^33 

EOEM/F/D/V 



The Lake County 

High Schools 

Technology Campus 

has an opening for a 

full-time 
Instructor 

in the 
Multl-Meclia 
Technology 






Instruct students in I 
multi-media author 

ing, computer graph- 
ics, animation, web 
design, and digital 
video production. 
Applicants should 

fax letter of applica- 
tion and resume to 

Jeff Blierton, 

Technology 

Campus, 

(847) 223-7363 



ALDI ALDI AUDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI 



CASHIERS NEEDED 

$11.00 Per Hour — Up to $14.00 Per Hour 

Applications arc being accepted from persons interested in working in a grocery store 
environment 

Responsibilities will lndudc prompt, courteous customer service, accurate cash control, 
efficient operations of the scanner cash register system and stocking merchandise. Must 
have a high school diploma or G.E.D. 

Cashiers needed who are wanting to work 20*35 hours per week with full benefits. Must 
be available lo work anytime between 6:00 am and 9:00 pm, Monday through Saturday. 

Also need cashiers who are interested In working under 20 hours per-weck with no ben- 
efits and a flexible schedule. Saturdays mandatory*. 

BENEFITS FOR CASHIERS WORKING 20-35 HOURS PER WEEK 

• Paid Major Medical Insurance 

• Paid Dental Insurance 

• Family Medical & Dental Insurance For $50/Month 

• Short-Term & Long-Term Disability Plans 

• 401K Plan 

• Retirement Income Plan 

• Six Paid National Holidays Per Year 

• One Paid Birthday Per Year 

• One Paid Personal Day Per Year 

• One Paid Kkkoff Day Per Year 

• Three Paid Sick Days Per Year 

• Paid Vacation After 6 Months of Service 

Positions available at the following locations: 

AJdi Aldi 

3331 BeMdere Road 1600 North Lewis 

Park City, Illinois Waukegan, Illinois 

An ALDI representative win be available for you to apply in person from 
7 am to 11 am. and 4 p.ra to 7 pm on Thursday, February 3, 2000 at 

HOLIDAY INN, 615 West Grand Avenue, Gurnce, Illinois 60031 



ALDI 



EQE/WF 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fuli-Tintc 



ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI ALDI 2 



TOOLMAKER/ 
MOLDMAKER 

Northern Wl-lmmed 
Openings. Exp'd Mold- 
maker, Prefer exp In 
CAD/CAM & CNC 
operations. We offer 
comp wages & bnfts. 
Low crime, affordable 
housing, dean air & 
water. Resume or let- 
ter of inquiry: Forest 
Tool, lnc,POBox215, 
Crandon.Wi 54520 



BED MAKER 

& 

HOUSEKEEPER 

Will tain the right person 

Hours arc varied, some 

days, some evenings. 

Need to know English. 

Apply in person at: 

Care Centre, of 

Wauconda '.. 

176 Thomas Ct. 

Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847)526-5551 
fax#.(847) 526-0807 



Safes 





I 



How about a better environment and earning 
potential? As a Sales Rep with TruGreen 
ChemLawn, you'll enjoy a. friendly atmosphere 
along with Incredible perks, including base 
salary, unlimited commissions, paid training . 
and advancement opportunities. No 
experience is necessary, just ambition. 

45K 
EARNING POTENTIAL 

We also offer: 

• 24-26K base salary 

• medical/dental/life insurance 

■-.'•' 401(k) • profit sharing 

• lucrative commissions • and more. 

Contact us at: 

•(888) 227-0383, 24 hours a day, 

7daysa week 

• Fax:(847)680-8089 

• Call for directions at: (847) 680-8088 

We're located 15 min. from Gurnee. 
EOE'AA/M/F/D/V 



TftU GREEN ChemLawn 

Everyone grows in our environment. 




DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further informaiion. 

Requirement - Bachelor's Degree 
& Substitute Certification 



Aptakistic - Tripp School District #102 
123 1 Weiland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-5338 

Deerikld School District #109 
517 Deerfield Road, Deerfield, IL 60015 

Contact: Denise DiCiemcnU x222 (847) 945-1844 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W*. Grass Lake Road, Amioch, II. 60002 

Contact: Patti or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslakc Community High School, District #127 
400 N. Lake Sl, Grayslakc, IL 60030 

Contact: Lana Madole x!2I0. (847) 223-8621 

Grayslake School District #46 
625 N, Barron Blvd., Gray-slake, IL 60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry xl 100 (847) 223-3650 

Gumec School District #56 
Spaulding, OTIaiue, & Viking Schools 
900 Kilboum Road, Gumee. IL 60031 

Contact: Sheila (847) 336-0800 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, IL60O6l 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-3279 

lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Decrpath, Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa. IL 60046 

Contact: Kaihy. (847) 356-2385 

North Chicago Community Unit School District #187 
2000 Lewis Are., North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mona Armstrong (847) 689-8150 

Round Lake Area School District #116 
316 South Rosedale Court. Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Vicky Gonzalez-Gomez. .{847) 546-5522 

Trevor Grade School District 
26325 Wilmot Road, Trevor, Wl 53179 

<7o///Y/c/:Rhonda (262) 862-2356 

Woodland School District #50 

17370 Gages Lake Rd, Gages Like, IL 60030 

Contact:!^ Lutz (847) 856-3605 



fcL »» »£-**■* »»»*^t d W~*« * .**TT 4 



BM 



f 



C20 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 28, 2000 



-/ 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



I kip Will it a! 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



'Help Wauled 
Full-Time 



220 



llelp.Wanted 
Full-Time 



GENERAL OFFICE 

To,$10/hr. Friendly 

co-workers 

welcome pitch-in 

attitude. Phone 

skills, light 

computer and good 

eye for detail. 

244-0016 or 

549-0016 

Superior Personnel 



MOLD 
MAKER 

Weukegan location. 

CNC, EDM, 

MASTERCAM. 

Experience preferred. 

Excellent growth potential 

and benefits. 

Fax resume 

847-689-4980 

or call for appointment 

847-689-4964 



J 



HEALTH CARE 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Cashier 

Diffpaili Mulled Is cum-nily siTkinj- 
full Uinc cjndiiblus uhii in detailed 
and customer service oriented. 
Chosen candidate will be responsible 
fur "applying insurance payments, 
cashiering, and balandnc. cash 
receipts. Ideal canilldaicswlU possess 
past experience In a medical facility. 
For confidential consideration send/ 
fax resumes to: Dcentalh Medical 
Assoc. Attn.: Human Resources, 71 
Vt'aukegan Rd, Sic. 900, Lake Bluff, IL 
60011. Fax: W7) 295-1517 or call 
(817) 535-KOKO. EOE 



EXPERIENCED 

WAITSTAFF 

Full or Part Time 
Must be willing to work 
evenings. Looking for 
mature individuals who 
are Interested In long 
term employment witn 
an established restau- 
rant. 
S100 Hiring Bonus! 
Call Armando 
(847)566-0475 
El Barrio Restaurant 
Mundeleln 



SPECIflL 


EDUCATION 


RIDE 


needed full time at 


Grass Lake 


School 


Call 


(847) 


395-1550 



***MECHANIC*** 

Long-standing spring co. 
seeks mechanically-In- 
clined person to train In 
the area of machine set- 
up. Must possess me- 
chanical ability & basic 
understanding of math 
skills. Pay rate based on 
mechanical exp. Exc bnft 
pkg. Toll Free 800-424- 
4526; Resume: 16000 
Common Rd,, Roseville, 
Ml 48066 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 



North Suburban Dealer- 
ship has an Immediate 
opening for its smalt office. 
Must have good people 
skills. Excellent opportuni- 
ty for ambitious Individual. 
Automotive or cashiering 
experience a plus, but will 
train. Excellent salary and 
benefits. 
Call Linda for appt. 
(847) 433-8200. 



<fjWA!;v 



MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 




I 



Health Cnro 

PHLEBOTOMISTS 

Quest Diagnostics, tho nation's 
loading provider ol diagnostic 
testing Information and srjrvtc- 
as. la a respected loadBr in the 
Clinical laboratory Held Wo cur- 
rently seek dynamic, outgoing 
Individuals with a deslru io help 
others to join our loam in those 
lull lima positions 

Wo require: 

• 1 year ol phlobolcrmy oxpeil 
once (Including geriatric and 
podlatilc) 

• excellent oral/written 
. communication skill? 

• knowledge ol OSHA & CLIA 

• computer literacy 

In return for your hard work and 

dodicniion, you'll receive n 
compolilivo salary and compre- 
hensive bonolils package For 
immodioio consideration, 
mall/Tax your resume to: 
QUEST DIAGNOSTICS 
Ann' Mike Baron 
310 S. Qroonloat, Sto, 210 
Gurnoo, ILGO031 
Fn*.847-3GO-OS73 
Equal Opporlunity Employer 





MEDICAL OFFICE 
COORDINATOR 



Our busy 
ophthalmology prac- 
tice Is looking for a 
dynamic Individual Tori 
the coordinator posi- 
tion in our Vernon 
Hills office. 
Responsibilities 
include optica), med- 
ical and front desk. 
Benefits include med- 
ical, denial, life Insur- 
ance, pension and 
401(k). Calljanfccnt 
(847)214-1657 
or fax resume to 
(847)244-5122. 



OPTOMETRIST 

Optometrist needed for 2- 
offlce Oplhalmology prac- 
tice w/optical. Loc'd In 
rural area 2 hrs to St. 
Louis. Regular hrs, mini- 
mal Saturdays. Sal 60- 
80K depending on exp. 
Reply by CV: Op- 
tometrist/Heartland, 36 S. 
Wabash Ave, Sto 702, 
Chicago, IL 60603. 



Fast paced, growing 

NW Suburban 

Optometrist 

looking for f/p time 

OPTICIAN/ 

OP TECH 

Esp. preferred, will train right 

person. Benefits available. 

(847) 362-3444 or 

(847) 541-1184 



Health Car* 

RNs/LPNs/CNAs 

Full-lime (ovonincs) and part-timo 
RNs/LPNs/'CNAs needed lo earn lor 
tho resident* ol our 120- bed conttnu 
mo earn comer. Musi bo caring, 
dopondaUo and liconsod in IL 
Previous oupenonce In long-lorm 
care Is desirable. Competitive pay 
and bontliis available. For immedi- 
ate, consideration, ploaso lax 
resume lo B4 7-350-4 509. 
Or apply In person ol: 

Victory Lakes 

Continuing Caro Center 

1055 East Grand Avonuo 

tjust oast ot Deep Lake Road) 

Llndonhurst, IL 60046 

Ph: 847-350-4551 

oojVm/f/dAr 



FRONT DESK/ 
MEDICAL TECH 



Like County ophthal- 

molof-y/optomclry 

practice seeks origin, 

I energetic individual for| 

this full time position. 

Excellent salary and 

benefits, 

Call. Ian ice at 

(847) 244-1657 x26 

or fax resume to 

(847) 244-5122 



Doctor's Office 
needs 

MEDICAL 

ASSISTANT 

or 

CNA 

with office experience. 

Must know how 

to take vitals. 

Full or Part time 

Call 

847-662-0350 



Hab Aides 

Nurses Aide 

All shifts. Flexible 

hours. 4-Bed Group 

Home. Pleasant work 

environment. 

Competitive salary. 

Please apply at 

1504 16th St. 

North Chicago 

(847) 244-231X 

UOl: 




torn 




ose 






What is opportunity like with o progressive nonprofit healthcare delivery system? Just ask (he people who work at All Saints Heatlhcore System. They'll talk 
straight from the heart about a supportive, friendly environment and the chance to bring compassionate care to palients and families. As a multi-campus, 
integrated system with more than 3,000 doctors, staff and volunteers, the opporlunity to be your best never ends. Join others who know why this is a place 
for excellence. . . a place for you. 



NURSING/ 

PATIENT CARE POSITIONS 



PROFESSIONAL/ 
TECHNICAL POSITIONS 



RNs 

•ICU 

• Med/Surg 

• Stroke Unit 

• Behavioral Health 

• Surgery 

LPN and Nursing Assislanl positions are available in various areas. 



• Employee Health 

• Emergency Department 

• Ortho/Neuro 

• Women & Infants 



•PC Analyst 

• Medical Technologist (PM 

• Surgical Technician 
•COTA 

• Medical Social Worker 

• Medical Assistant 



1 Dialysis Technician 

• PC Educator 
•Biomedical Technician 

• Diagnostic Radiographers 
•PhlebotomisttPM Shift) 

• Discharge Planning Coordinator 



Telehealth Nurse 

These RNs wilt respond to telephone calls according to urgency, 
collect and interpret data. to identify patient needs and life 
threatening emergencies, and serve as a patient resource. 
Candidates must be graduates of an accredited school of nurs- 
ing, have CPR certification and 2 years' recent medical/surgical, 
critical/emergency or ambulatory care nursing experience. 



■ ■ J've found my position as a triage nurse at ^Ttlehcallh challenging 
and rewarding. D have heat an SIN for IO years with ^Neonatal, 
• Pediatric and ^Adult triage experience, D especially enjoy the 
teaching aspect of the position, families are appreciative of the 
consistency of the advice given. J J 

Jenifer Wietfetdt, RN 



LEADERSHIP POSITIONS 



• Perioperative Nurse Specialist 

• Medical Imaging Technical Coordinator 

• Nursing Supervisor 

• I.S. Manager 

Our convenient location, between Milwaukee and Chicago, attracts the 
best and offers quiet lakefront living with many recreational, cultural and 
educational advantages. In addition, we provide excellent benefits that 
include tuition reimbursement, child care voucher plan and a fitness facil- 
ity. To apply, send a resume to: 3801 Spring Street, Racine, Wl 
53405; Fax: 262-636-4133, Phone: 262-636-4294; email: 
hr@allsafntshealthcare.org. We are an equal opportunity employer 
and maintain o safe work environment through post-offer drug testing. 




CNA/ 
AIDES 

Intermediate Care Facility 

lor Women with 
Developmental Disabilities 

Seeking CNAs cr AIDES. 

Part limo and Full time 

positions available, 

primarily PM shift, 

and weekends. 

Wilting to train, 
experience is not required. 

Contact 

Mt. St. Joseph 
847-438-5050 



Health Core 

Victory- Community EldcrCARE Ins 
] excellent opportunities unliable fun 

CORPORATE 

ELDERCARE 

COORDINATOR 

'In this pan time piishton, you 
ail! be responsible far coanll- 
iratlng this new program as we 
Introduce h lo ana employers, 
i To qualify, you should possess a 
' degree in marketing or a related 
area along »ith excellent com- 
munication and computer 
skills. 

CLERICAL 
ASSISTANT 
Must be familiar with wo rd pro- 
cessing, have prolans clerical 
experience and be wry profl- 
.dent In telephone communlca- 
I lion. This position Is IS hours 
per week. 

(lease call or send resume lo; 
Cindy Hall, Human Resources 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

132-1 N.SIierlilanRd. 

WaukcKan.lL 60085 

I'll: (847) 360-1 1 70 

Fax: (8-17) 360-1230 

email; liumanrcsources® 

lconncct.net 



QMRP/ 

Residential 

Service Director 

Small group homes 

looking for n QMFU? This 

person must Iibms a DA 

Detrreo tn Human Services 

field. Must liave worked 

tilth MJV population for at 

least I yeoe Supervisory 

experience Is needed. 

Please send resume lot 

IS04 IGthSL 

North Chicago, ILG0004 

or fax resume lo 

B47-473-330O 



Seeking LPN/RNs 
in our Lake Zurich 
Intermediate Care 
facility. Needed: 
Part-time, 2 PM to 
10:30 PM and 10:00 
PM to 6:00 AM, every 
other weekend is 
required. In addi- 
tion, need full-time: 
10 PM to 6 AM and 
2 PM to 10:30 PM, 
every other week- 
end. If interested, 
contact: 
Mt. St. Joseph 

D.O.N. 
847-438-5050 



Nursing Opportunities 
Full-Time 

Mulli-Specirtlty Ftiyticioui Group in Uikr Gunny n tuncnily tcdiing Medical 

AwMjhu ulki arc drilit jirJ to providing (jualily paliciil care. Your cfTura will 

Ur rewankd widi ttwipcliltvc pay and hciKfiu. Fnr norifidcijlial coniidcration 

vnd icuuiKi to Dccrpadi Medical Aiwciaies, Ann: Human Resources 

71 Waulcgan Rd.. Sic. 900, Lake Bluff, IL £0044 

Fa* : (847) MS- 1 SJ7 or cal 1(847) 535- SO* I ROE 



L»~ Activity Aide - 1 



The Activity Department 
is very important In pro- 
viding our residents 
wiili a day full of mean- 
ingful programs, pro- 
jects, and opportunities 
for socialization. He part 
of a professional team 
where staff members 
and their ideas arc one 
of our most precious 
resources! 



(Earn Up to $8.35 start- 
ing/ with Experience) 

• Full/Part Time 
Openings Available 

• Flexible Hours 

• Get to know Susan 
by contacting: 

Libertyville Manor 

610 Peterson Road (Hwy 137) 

Ubertyviltc, IL 60048 

(847)367-6100 



Certified Nurses Aids 

(Earn Up to $10.35 Starting / with Experience) 



• Low Resident Staff Ratio 

• Health/Dental Program 

• Opportunity For Growth 
and' Advanceme nt 

■ Get to know Peggy by 
contacting: 

Libertyville Manor 

6 JO Peterson Road (Hwy. 137) 

Libertyville, IL 60048 , 

C847) 367-6100 



• Flexible Hours 

• Quarterly Bonuses 

• Profit Sharing 

• Paid Sick Days/ 
Holidays 

• Overtime Available 



00 



► 



)le 
ri- 
al, 
ng 
vlll 
nd 



n 



January 28, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 












220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time . -' 



THE BEST INN HOTEL OF UBERTYVILLE 



. is searching for 
Front Desk Guest Representatives 

Absolutely must be professional, flexible, 

customer service oriented and a team player. 

Outstanding pay, benefits and working 

environment. Join our winning team. 

Apply In. person at 1809 N. Milwaukee. 

EOE. 



%t LEGAL SECRETARY/ 
PARALEGAL 

Law firm seeks Individual with good typing and organi- 
zational skills to perform paralegal duties In Litigation 
Department. Knowledge of Microsoft Office a plus". 
Excellent benefit package. 
Send Resume or Fax to - 
H60. North poi nt Blvd., Waukcgan, IL 60085 

Fax: C847) 887-8519 

3i\, Attn: Deborah Flgucroa 



'-: 



L 



t— 



•' 



__ 



Maintenance Technicians 

Nichols Aluminum Lincolnshire an ISO 9002 certified 
leader In the processing of cold rolled aluminum sheet Is seek- 
ing qualified maintenance technicians. The qualifications 
include knowledge and proficiency In welding/gas cutting, 
hydraulics, pipe fitting, pumps, power transmission, lubrica- 
tion, rigging, shop machines « tools and equipment, basic elec- 
trical and pneumatic. 

Starting wage will be $18.28 for Individuals successfully pass- 
ing the maintenance qualification test. Additional wages 
Include a production bonus shared by all shop employees, 
quarterly safety bonus, yearly attendance bonus and 3-2-2 
premium. 

An excellent benefit package including: Group Health, Dental, 
and life, a 401-K plan which includes a 6.5% contribution by 
the Company after one year and a stock purchase plan. 
Please send resume to: 

Nichols Aluminum 

200 Schelter Road 

Llncotnshlre.lL 60069 

Attn: Stan Whlteman 

EOE/M/F/H/V 



RESTAURANT 



W 



Monday 1/31/00° 9AM-6PM 

GO South Waultegan Rd., Deerfield, IL 
_PltQlu3; 847-291-1142 



COOKS 

SERVERS 

HOSTS/HOSTESSES 

Full-time, Part-time 
GREAT DAY SHIFTS 

Talk to us about our flexible hours, competitive pay, meal 
discounts, and career advancement 




M AN AG EM ENT CANDIDATES 



O 



You'll enjoy our dynamic environment that provides out- 
standing benefits including 
medical & 401 k, and a gen- 
erous salary and bonus 
structure. Recent restau- 
rant management experi- 
ence is required. 
t EOE M/F 




Neighborhood Q*I 4 Bor 




• Up to S11.20.hr. To Start, Up to $14.68/hr 
(for experienced drivers) 

•401K 
•Paid Training 

• No Nights Or Weekends Required 

• Advancement'Opportunltles 

• Summers & Holidays Olf (Summer Work Available) 

• PRESCHOOL CHILDREN MAY RIDE ON BUS WIH PARENT DRIVER 

• INDEPENDENTWORK ENVIRONMENT! 

What a great way to help your community and your income potential. 

CALL: 

1-883-230-KIDS 



Laidtaw will dpnate $200 to any church or community 
organization who refers members that are successfully hired. 



We carry The Nation's Future* 

r/T/A \ 




SERVING THE CMICAGOIAND AREA WITH 30 LOCATIONS £& 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Hclp.Wanted 
■■'■• RiS^Diae 



22.0 




Lakeland Newspapers I \* 



Help Wanted 
ruII-Tirric 



220 



mm r. 



Cleficat/Gufnce 

Mission minded Christian 
seeking church and position. 

Office Sec/Coordinator 
highly organized, mature skills 

Bookkeeper/Secretary/ 
Receptionist 

smiles, multi-task 
computer skills 

New Melhodist Church & 
Child Center 

263-6314 

Fax 263-6334 

llvewellum@holmail.com 



MOLOER 

Waukegan location. 
MOLDING 
MACHINE 
OPERATOR 
& 
SHOP 
ASSISTANT. 
Will train. - 
Excellent growth 
potential 
and benefits, 
Call for an appointment 
847-689-4964' 



K*z£cHEVBOLET 



K/IEGA STORE 

Licenses. Title Clerk - Seeking exp. UT clerk to 



handle large volume, some overtime, hours M-F, 8-5, 
must be dependable. 

Blller - Auto dealer seeks exp. Auto Blller. Must be 



reliable and able to handle large volume sales, end of 
month overtime, hours M-F, 8-5. 

Inventory Clerk - Full-time, M-F, 8-5, Auto Dealer exp. 

helpful. 

Apply At 
Rockenbach Chevrolet Sales 

1000 E. Belvidere Rd. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



Or call 847-223-8651 , Ext 3131 . Ask for Vicky. 



iier exp. 

J 

/icky. 



-" -.■■_-• 




i 



m 




, 



A RE YOU PERSISTENT, 

DEPENDABLE, OUTGOING, 

RESPONSIBLE & ORGANIZED? 

Lakeland Newspapers has the perfect career 

opportunity for you in our exciting sales 
department. This job involves sales calls out- 
side the office so a dependable car is necessary, 
Wc offer great benefits! 

• Salary plus Commission 

• Health Insurance 

• Dental Insurance 

• Disability & Life Insurance 

• A Matching 401 K Plan 

• Gas Allowance 

. • Phone Reimbursement 

So if you're self-moiivatcd. highly organized, 

and very personable, you're sure to be a 

success. Experience a plus, but will train the 

right person. For an interview appointment call 

Bob Schroedcr 

Lakeland Newspapers 

. (847)223-8161x113 



- 






kVif/tir»> 



Start The Year 
WithABettGr Starting 

Salary 




per hour! 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR.. 

A Career Change? On-The- Job Training? 
Company Stability? Increase In Salary? 
Thenstart 2000 with one of the biggest names 
In the office products business. Quill is 
continuing to experience tremendous growth 
and Is now hiring warehouse positions ATA 
NEW STARTING RATE! Check us out! 

WAREHOUSE POSITIONS 

We are looking for responsible, motivated 
Individuals who enjoy working in a fast paced 
environment, are attentive to detail and have the 
ability to lift 70 lbs. Apply In person or fax 
resumes to: 

Quill Corporation, 100 Schelter Rd., Lincolnshire 
IL 60069. FAX 847-634-5820. We are an equal 
opportunity employer. 




[■emm 



eosMions- F "' ! ? !a| 



1ST Sinn 



• Receptionist 



2NI> AND .-WI) SHIFT 



• Data Entry Clerks 

• Package Handlers 



Great Starter Positions 
Will train 

AVAILABLE NOW 

Applv in Ifcrwin " 



K&R TRANSPORTATION 
30*59 AVr Washington 

. Waiikcgun*. II. 



P.M. SUPERV1SOR/ASST. 

DIRECTOR OF FOOD SERVICES 

FT needed for evenings (12-8 p.m.). Must be a team 
player & able to assume cook responsibilities. Past 
management exp. desired. Food service & sanitation 
certificate desired but not required. 

Send resume or apply in person at: 

CARE CENTRE OF WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 6O084 

C847) 526-5551 

C847) 526-0807 FAX# 



J 



!..+?*.•* ■*■* vito k n m M m»*m,m***m**mm*m* m m i — ■■ 



Entry Level Reporter 

The Great Lakes Bulletin is looking for someone with a 
passion for Writing about die Naval Training Center Great 
Lakes .This full-time, entry level position w<li give the right 
candidate an opportunity to cover the fast-paced, exciting 

world of U.S. Navy training right here in Lake County. 

Previous experience wlrh military base newspapers will be 

helpful to the candidate, but is not required. 

It's not |ust a job, It's an adventure - let the Journey begin! 

Please send or fax resume and cover letter to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Wardc 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, tt 60030 

FAX: (8473 223-8810 



wur 



MAINTENAiNCE SERVICE TECHNICIAN 



The Village of Wauconda (pop. 9000) seeks 
Maintenance Service Technician. Job requires 
maintenance of streets, sewer, water system, 
snowplowing, and other duties as required. Good 
mechanical ability and work habits. Requires CDL 
or ability to acquire CDL within 120 days of hire 
Pay rate $12.58 to $16.87 with fiul benefits. Job 
open until filled. 
Applications available at the Village Hall, 
101 N. Main, Wauconda. 



STOCKROOM/ 
DATA ENTRY 



Night Shift 3 pm-1 am 
4 nights per week 

Experience preferred but will train 
Please apply In person 8:30am-5pm or fax resume. 



CARTER-HOFFMANN 

Since 19-f 7. ffxxlscrvlcc equipment that delivers! 

1551 McCormickAvc.MundcIdn,IL 60060 

FAX.-847-367-S981 

EOE 



JOB FAIR 



JOB FAIR 



^ 



Factory 
Outlet 

1/2 Off 

The Lowes! Ticketed Price 



COMING SOON TO GURNEE MILLS 

Full-time and part-time positions are available 

• Bookkeeping/Cash Office • Sales Associates 

• Six Department Managers • Warehouse/Security 

• Sales Supervisor • Custodians 

• Great benefits including 20% discount 

• Competitive wages 

• 401 k savings plan 

• Flexible scheduling 

• Bonus potential 

STOP BY FOR AN INTERVIEW 

Thursday - Saturday 

January 27, 28 & 29, 2000 • 10 AM - 6 PM 

At the VF Factory Outlet Store (use exterior entrance to 

VF Store near Mail Entrance F) in the Gurnee Mills Mall 

between Goodslone Jewelers and Samsonile (lormerly 

Computer City), or fax resume to VF Factory Outlet, 

Human Resources Manager at 610-378-9364. 

Lee $&*%>• VAawjter rfealtirtex 



E.O.E - M/F/D/V 



llclpWamed 
Full-Ume 



*STYUST 

*NAILTECH 

•MAKEUP-AFfTlST 

.FlexvHrs. Please Apply 
In Person or Cat! 
OFF BROADWAY 

4949 Grand Ave., Gurnee 
- 847-662-6603 



r Growing Tag and label Mfr. 
Seeking 
PRESS and 
MACHINE OPERATORS 
Competitive Pay Rates/ 

Full Benefits 
Brand New Plant/Facilities 

Exp. or Trainees 

Ability to read and write 

English required. 

Pay starts at 
$9.00/hr-S12.0Ohr 
Pay depends heavily on ap- 
titude and/or experience. • 
Call Chris at 
847-362-5100 '" 
Chicago Tag and Label Inc. 
Ubertyvllle, IL 



Accounting 
Clerk 

lakeland Publishers' busy 
accounting dept. has an 
immediate opening for an 
experienced person who 
enjoys all phases of 
accounting: payables, 
accounts receivable 
| including collections, 
report preparation of 
monthly P&L; reconcilia- 
tions. Will join staff of five 
emphasizing teamwork. 
Congenial surroundings. 
Chance to advance. Salary 

based on experience. 

Complete health, 401 (k) 

match. Fas resume to 

847-225-8810 or submit 

application to 

Chris Montes 

30 S. Whitney SL 

Grayslake, 11 60030 



MACHINIST 

Sunny Phoenix. AZ! Immed 
Opening-skilled Machinist. 
35+ yr Cable Connector Mfr 
seeks qualified Setup 
Operators. Home of the 
Phoenix Cardinals & 
Coyotes & Arizona 
Diamondbacks. Must be 
able to read & interpret blue- 
prints. Ability to operate & 
check work w/in close toler- 
ance, regrind & reset tools, 
diagnose problems. We 
offer exc. classroom 4 on- 
the-job training & quality 
eqpmLYr-round overtime 
w/llex his. Bntts indude 
MeaVDent/Vision/Life/Dis- 
ability insurance & 401 K, 
relo avail. Day & night shifts 
avail. Wage depending on 
exp. Resume: Gilbert 
Engineering Co. Inc., 
Personnel Coordinator, PO 
Box 23189, Phoenix, AZ 
B5063-3189 
www.hu/naflresources 
©piYbertconnectors.com 
EOE 



M NPtl-K.iirui> 



SET-UP/ 

MACHINE 

OPERATOR 

1 -i-.uling manufacturer of com- 
ponent* Tor lite loud speaker - 
industry i* seeking a SET- 
UP/MACHINE OPERATOR 
for 1st SHIFT. Ideal candidate 
will liavc: 

■ mechanical aptitude 

■ lyr exp in manufacturing 

■ stable work record 

■ able In lift up to 80 pounds 

Apply in person or mail/fa* 
(847-J958RG2) resume aim: 
Human Resources. NuWay 
Speaker Products lite.. 90S 
Anita Ave.. Anlioch. IL 60001 

EINuWay 



mm 



C22 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 28, 2000 



«'t 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



GENERAL OFFICE 

tmmediale opening for 
a personable individual 
who enjoys a variety 
of office duties includ- 
ing direct contact with 
customers. Auto deal- 
ership exp. helpful, but 
will train the right per- 
son eager to learn. 

Excellent benefits 
include insurance and 
401 K. Call Mary Lou 

at 847-362-4300. 

Pauly Honda 

Libertyviile 



Farm 

PresliQoul tiige private r!-r>— ,.iaa 
irairwifl BUtle in Northern Illinois has 
Outstanding openings lor (he lo'lowng 

STABLE MANAGER 
Posaon Reports lo Director Tho per* 
son wu seek mat be jUe la siwb*- 
viss a support stall. intet.ia success- 
fully win all levels o< eiroioyees. 
boat ill' d'erfsrhorjos and Ihe osner- 
al puMC assist with year round man- 
agement ol liaining and s«asonal 
diessaga programs The suMt'SShU 
candKitto w.n have prevous if, i ■ ■ 
enco In the above areas and possess 
eiCL-t'eni communicaoon'rruiuQfn^ni 
(kills Housing assistance pa ss'til^- 

STABLE GROOM 
The person we seek musl be i : .■■•■ Is 
groom and allerid lo our norses on a 
■ r-tfjiir |j.is.s Must ba aUo and witl- 
ing lo assist with all lewis ol General 
labor in: Mi* I in our dorse cp oration 
IrVe oiler regular, 5taoy envkiymant. 
good pay and benefits plus cppdrtunl- 
dly tor advancement 

inter oslcd canoVJatos are encou»atjM 
lo apply rn person or send ccrtidontiai 
rosumf "itili-t including salary requirc- 
mcnlsto 

Temptl Firms 
Mr George WJturrrs 

i ' "<: I .-.■.-! v.- m: i -,-... I 

CldMillCieeklLGOCU 

eo» 



FLOOR CARE/ 
MAINTENANCE 



FT JANITOR NEEDED 
M-F WITH SOME MAIN- 
TENANCE RESPONSIBILI- 
TIES. MUST WORK WELL 
INDEPENDENTLY & BE A 
GOOD TEAM PLAYER. 
PREVIOUS FLOOR CARE 
EXP. HELPFUL BUT WILL 
TRAIN. 
APPLY IN PERSON AT: 
CARE CENTRE OF 

WAUCONDA 

176 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

(847)526-5551 



Graphics 

IMAGING TECHNICIAN 



Dunaliir Cwiinils, a Furtiinc 500 
company IncaiL-d In iinnliL-ni IL, h;u 
.in Inimuil, npeniiiR fur an Inuring 
Technician. Qualified jgtplicunl 
w/pnssess ihc ftitlimfng skills: ability 
lo use imposing etruiril, wet bench 
processing (dewlnplng, itching & 
ruslst stripping) & microscopic 
Inspection. Previous exp In trie 
graphic urn fluid -and/or trUaJ sil- 
ver hallile and/or dlmi film process- 
es is j plus. We offer a competitive 
Vr-jge & luiiefl I pkg Including nietl- 
lea), denial, vision, -link, vacation & 
holidays effective on (he Isi day of 
employment. Qualified candidates 
may submit resume w/salary rei|'s lo: 

Danahcr Controls 
1675 Dclany Road 
Gurncc.lL 60031 

Fax: (847) 662-6633 
EOE M/I7D/V 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Do You Love 

CllildREN? 

Christian working 

environment & a friendly 

staff". If this appeals to 

you please call or 

apply in person at 

Little Lamb 

Christian Preschool 

36448 N. Fuller Rd. 

Gurncc 

847-360-9042 ' 

Positions available: 

• Tench it's Aide 

• After K-Tencher 

• Preschool Teacher 

F1VIT 
Offering sign-oa bonus 
Free child care 



ENTRY LEVEL 
REPORTER 

Lakeland Newspapers Is 
looking lor someone with 
a passion for journalism. 
This full-lime entry level 
position will give the right 
candidate a chance to get 
his or her foot in the door 

as a local community 

journalist, covering the lull 

gamut ol stories that 

happen weekly in 

Lake County villages. 

Please send or FAX 

resume wilh cover letter lo: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Robert Warde 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake. Illinois 

60030 

FAX: (847) 223-8810 

la si 



QA 
TECHNICIAN 

Wc are looking for a responsible 

self-srjuicr to support our QA 

dept. on 2nd shift. 

To qualify you MUST: 

■ have manufacturing exp. 

■ be computer literate 

■ have the ability to use 
various measuring 
instruments 

■ tic able to work without 
close supervision 

WILL TRAIN!!! 

Apply ill person nr tclhl/ftu resume UK 

Human Resources Dept. 

NuWay Speaker Products, Inc. 

905 AnlUi Aw., Anlioch. IL 60002 

Fix: B47-395-8862 

MNuWay 



AUTO 

Sunny Phoenix, AZ-lmmed 
Openings. Phoenix's lead- 
ing Ford Dealership is offer- 
ing exceptional career 
opptys for qualified Automo- 
tive Techs: Heavy Line, 
Auto Transmission & more. 
Mel Clayton Ford features 
modern, fully eqppd service 
dept. We offer high pay, 
401 K plan, paid vacas/lrain 
ing/hldys & oppty for ad 
vancement. Mel Clayton 
Ford's ownership takes 
pride in lis rep as an excep 
Uonal place to work here In 
America's Best City. Apply 
now: Jim Harkness 602-264' 
161 1x 1100; Visit our web 
site Automollve-techni 
clans.com & apply now. 



r 1 



K&R Transportation has the following openings: 

DISPATCHER 1:00 PM-9:45 PM 

Typing skills & knowledge of city & suburbs. 

WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR 10:00 PM-6:45 AM 
Must have experience. 

Apply in person: 

K&R Transportation 

3059 W. Washington 

Waukegan, IL 




Immediate openings - Call now! 



- Temp-Temp to Hire and Direct Hire 

Northern Suburbs 

• Gen Office up to S10 hr 

• Rcccpi up to S 1 3 hr 

• Data Entry/Cust. Service up to S 13 hr 

• Admin. A.ssistup to $17 hr 

• Exec. Assist up to $19 hr 

• Call Center Mgr 550,000 

• Admin Supervisor 550 - 60 

• Reg. Sales Mgr. $58 + com 

• Accounting Clerk $25,000 

Call us today for more info. 

Ask for Tricla (800) 584-768J or Fax (847) 465-2028 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 





* ** Spring 






Maker* * * 




Long-standing spring co. 
seeks exp'd set-up person 
w/Shfnko cqpmt. Top 
wages & all fringes. Toll 
Free 800-424-4526; Re- 
sume: 16000 Common Rd„ 
Roseville, Ml 48066, 



GENERAL OFFICE/ 
CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Computer skills 
helpful, 3 1-37 hrs 

call' 
(847)336-8595 



UNION 
CARPENTERS 

WANTED 

call 

RESIDENTIAL 

CARPENTRY INC. 

(630) 529-5520 



Fast paced, growing NW 

suburban Optometrist 

looking for full time 

FRONT DESK 

RECEPTIONIST 

Exp. preferred, will train 

right person. 

847-362-3444 
or 847-541-1184 



FuH/Part Time 

FOOD SERVICE 

WORKERS 

Excellent Hoursl 

Great Pay! Hiring Bonus! 

Ploaso Call 

847-270-3003 



WATTSTAFF 

F/T - P/T 
j Line Cooks Experienced 

WANNA MAKE SOME 
j CASH AND HAVE FUN? 
! DUKE'S GRILL 
I C847> 5Z6-O002 j 




Experienced 
Groom or Wanted 
Full Time 
B.C. Dog Training 
Grooming & Pot 

Supply 
847-566-1960 
Ask For Cathlo 



Reservationist 

Full time days. 
Excellent benefits. 
Call (847) 740-9301 



Teachers 
& Assistants 



For state-of-the-art 

child care center in 

Lincolnshire Corp. 

Center 

Call Kathy 

847-634-1982 



Maintenance 

FACILITIES LEAD 

Souililakc Educational Center 

Responsibilities include liic 
day-to-day operations of the 
facility (electrical. IIVAC, 
grounds maintenance and 
custodial) and supervlsinR 
staff. US diploma or GEO, 2 
years of maintenance/custodi- 
al experience and superviso- 
ry experience required. 
Submit your application to 
Hit, COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY, .19351 W. 

Washington St., Grayslake. IL 
60030-1198 by February 9. 
2000 or rax (847) 223-OH2-1, 
http://wivw.clc.cc.ll.us/ An 
Equal Oppon unity Employer. 



<My. 



$4075 



19 



I'Lice your word r;i|e ad in 1 1 

Liikckmd p;iper>. Great Lakes 

Bulletin. Market Journal .mil 

on lite Internet, .ill forS19.73! 

Price billed on 15 words 

or fewer. Deadline is 

Tuesday 5:00 pm, Call Lisa 

(847V 223-8161 




Business 
Opportunities 



ASSEMBLY-10 companies 
need home workers Imme- 
diately! Call 347-604-4476, 
DeptLPL 

ATTENTION SMOKERS: 
NEVER pay for cigarettes 
againl All major brands. (847) 

245-8523 or 
yvww.ciqar6ttBSforfree.com 

FREE 3 MINUTE message. 
Reveals how you can earn an 
extra S500-S2.000 per month. 
24hr. message. (877) 574- 
4184. 

GARDEN GIFTS 

You can earn $20-$40 

an hour as an 

. lndopondont Consultant 

with Wlldflowers Garden 

Party, inc., a new Homo 

Party Company, 

Sell beautifully designed, 

hard-to-flnd garden 

products. 

Year-round catalogs. 

Fun and rewarding! 

Call (847) 949-7375. 

INTERNATIONAL COMPANY 

JUST STARTED DOING 

BUSINESS IN INDIA. 

Wanted: bilingual speaking. 

For information call phone If 

" for appt. 847-872-3580 

Email: herbatgar@spry- 

net.com 



MAKE MONEY 

SURFING THE WEB 

I will tell you how for free 

e-mail me: 

klemmy2@rnindsprlng.com, 

NEW AUTOMATED HOME 
business (patent pending) un- 
limited Income. No selling. 
Weekly checks. $168 initial 
cost. Internet required. Tro- 
mendous fax benefits. 800- 
621-4889 complete recorded 
presentation. (SCA Network). 



228 



Situations Wanted 



ELDERLY CARE L.P.N. 

looking for live-In position. Ex- 
cellent references. (847) 
672-2791. 



240 



Child Care 



CHILD CARE NEEDED In my 
home or yours, 10:30am- 
5:30pm, Monday-Tuesday- 
Thursday- Friday, Wednesday 
8:30am-5:30pm. 1 -preschool- 
er, 2-school aged. Wauconda. 
(847)487-2101. 



CHILD CARE/HOUSE- 
KEEPER NEEDED in Grays- 
lake for 3 children, Monday- 
Friday, 8am-5pm. English 
speaking, experience and ref- 
erences required. Call (847) 
548-2007. 

ISLAND LAKE MOM has 2 
full-time openings, Monday- 
Friday, 6am-6pm. Large 
fenced-in yard on quiet street. 
Any age. Call Krlsty (847) 
526-6510. 

ISLAND LAKE CARE 

GIVER HAS full and part-time 
openings, large fenced in yard 
and playroom, lunch and 
snacks, CPR/Flrst Aide train- 
Ing. (847)487-7921. 

WADSWORTH FAMILY 

SEEKS quality In-home day- 
care for 6 & 8yr. olds, Monday- 
Friday, 12-5. Reliable car and 
references required. English 
speaking. Non-smoker. (847) 
856-0778. 



250 



School/Instruction 



PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students . 
Syrs, lo adult.- 
Over 25yrs. experience. 
REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



301 


Antiques 



ANTIQUE DINING SUITE. 

William and Mary style dining- 
room suite, C-1920, In very 
good condition, table with pull 
out leaves, 2-head chairs with 
arms, 6-slde chairs and buffet, 
professionally appraised at 
$4,150 asking S3.500, (847) 
546-0739. 




304 



Appliances 



CALORIC PRESTIGE SER- 
IES, almond double oven, 
good condition, $250. (847) 
3S5-5435. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



BEANIE BABY SALE 

Saturday 1/29, 

9am-4pm. 

Best Western Hotel 

Rt. 173. Anlioch. 

CONSTRUCTION EQUIP- 
MENT 1990 Case 580K 
backhoo. 1978 GMC 10 yard 
dump, 1978 International 10 
yard dump. 1986 Chevy utility 
body truck. 1989 Ford utility 
body truck. 1980 GMC 1 ton 
pickup. (847) 546-1474. 



314 


Building Materials 



ARCH STEEL BUILDINGS 
INVENTORY CLEARANCE. 
Huge Savings. 1999 steel pric- 
es. -25x30, 40x58, 50x110. 
While supplies last. Great 
workshops/garages. Call 1- 
800-341-7007. 
www.steelmasterusa.com 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $8,148. 50x75x14, 
$11,019. • 50x100x16, 

$14,196. 60x100x16, $16,193. 
Mini-storage buildings. 

40x160, 32 Units, $16,534. 
Free brochures, www.sentlnel* 
buildings.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0790. Exten- 
sion 79. 

TWO STEEL BUILDINGS, 
Engineered Certified. 40x100 
was $16,880 now $7,990. 
40x40 was $8,316 now 
$3,990. Must soil, can deliver. 
1-800-292-0111. 



ETTT 



Business 
Office Equipment 



COPIER MINOLTA, LIKE 
new, only 1500 copies made, 
autofeed/sorter. New $8,000, 
asking $1,975. (847) 
488-1373. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



777 SLOT MACHINE 777 
full size slot machine, $425. 
Two to choose from with war- 
ranty. (647) 548-1084. 

DELL COMPUTERS...FAC- 
TORY DIRECT. $0 down. 
Low monthly payment. Penti- 
um III-600 available. Some 
credit problems OK. Call by 
Jan. 14, for free printer. OMC 
800-477-9016 Code kn02. 



DON'T THROW AWAY 
YOUR OLD COMPUTER 
EQUIPMENT. I will come 
and pick It up for FREE. Call 
(847) 566-2819 after 5:30pm. 



FOR SALE TEST equip- 
ment: electronic parts, diodes, 
chips, lamps, fuses. (847) 
526-7760 after 5pm. 



GET PAID 

TOSURFTHEWEBI 

If you ever surf the web, then 

why not get paid far It? I just 

received my first check 

Check itoutl 

Just go to: 

www.alladvantage.com. 

When you sign up use the 

reference code DXX-947. 



KUHLMANN DRAFTING 
MACHINE AND TABLE, 
$450. Lexmark printer copy 
scanner and fax, $350. Xerox 
copy machine #5310, $350. 
(847) 526-7255. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
Is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847) 223-8161. ext. 140. 



338 


Horses & Tacks 



18YR. GRADE TENN. 
WALKER MARE, 15.1H, red 
bay, great looks, good gait. 
Used as brood mare. Intmed. 
rider req. $1.200/best. (847) 
356-3098 alter 6pm, 

FOUR HORSE GOOSE* 
NECK, dressing room, ramp 
load, newer tires, brakes and 
springs, $2,000/best. (262) 
835-2716. 

SADDLE SHOP HORSE 

trailers. Western/English, 
new/used. Buy, soil, trade. The 
Corral, Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(414) 593-8048. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



ANTIQUE POCKET BIL- 
LIARD TABLE (Brunswick Ar- 
cade), 4-1/2ft.x9ft„ f-1/2ln. 
slate top, $9,500/best raason- 
able offer. (847) 662-0943, , 

ARMOIRES + 

15,000 other solid wood 

. furniture Items available. 

•Unfinished 

•Finished 

•Customized 

TREEHOUSE STUDIO 

(downtown McHenry) 

(815)344-0911 

www.treehousesludio.net 



ATTENTION QUILTERSI 
FEATHERWEIGHT, with 
case and attachments, Pris- 
tine. (847) 263-6995, (847) 
587-4910. 



CALIFORNIA KING WA- 
TERBED, headboard lights, 
8-drawers underneath, 3-stor- 
age cupboards, 1-dresser, 1- 
nlghtstand, 1 -chest, black wilh 
mirrors, excellent condition, 
$1,400 for all. (847) 
740-2513. 



DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted llghl fixtures, grandfa- 
ther clock, armoires and as- 
sorted couches with love- 
seats. By owner. (847) 
438-6997. 

DININGROOM BREAK- 
FRONT AND SIDE BOARD, 
unique Victorian wilh inlays, 
excellent condition, $600. 
(847)501-3914. 

DININGROOM SET, 
CHERRY, 6-chairs, 1-leaf, 
china cabinet, $1,500. (847) 
746-5492, 

Dryer, compactor & dressers, 

coffee table, assorted table 

lamps & assorted desks. (2) 

2pc. sectionals. Armoires, 

dining room & dlnetto sets. 

Baby grand piano. By owner 

(847) 438-6997 

ELEVEN PIECE THOMAS- 
VILLE DININGROOM SET. 
great shape, $1,075/best. 

(847) 599-90B9. 

HOT TUB BUYERS: Buy 
from manufacturer. Save 
51000 to $1500. Prices start at 
51995. FREE VIDEO, price list 
1-800-869-0406. 
www.goodllfespa.com 

SOLID WOOD DRESS- 
ERS, brass day bed, file cabi- 
nets, more. Good condition. 
Best otter. (847)543-1672. 

GIANT 

NEW YEAR 

FURNITURE SALE 

•Deluxe 3-piece sofa, love, 

chair, $290. 

•3-ploce100% Italian 

Leather sofa/loveseat and 

chair. $1,290, 

•Italian lacquer bedroom set, 

$790. 
• Italian mahogany bedroom 

set $990. 
•Queen pillow top mattress 

set, $200. 

* King size mattress set, 

deluxe, $350, 

*7-piece cherry dinlnlgroom 

set, $490. 

•Benchcraft Italian leather 

sectional, wilh 2-recllners and 

sleeper, $1,895. 

•Italian leather sofa sleeper, 

$695. 

'Italian Leather green 

sectional, $1,495. 
'Bone pearllzed leather 

sectional, $1,895. 

•Italian Imported lOplece 

mahogany diningroom set, 

was $4,500, now $1,995. 

* Italian marble diningroom 

set, with chairs, $1,295, 

Seven piece cherry finish 

diningroom sot, $299 . 

FACTORY CLOSE OUTS: 

Twin size mattress set. 

$69.95. 

•Full Size $79.95. 

'Queen size $99.95. 

•Butcher block diningroom set 

$75. 

•Black metal futon with 

mattress, $125. 

•3-piece cocktail table set, 

$69.95 
•Queen Anne design cherry 

dosk, $125. 
Imported rugs, art, statues, 

and much more. 

Wa carry Thousands of 

Items for your Christmas 

shopping. 

Celebrating our 

49th. Year. 

Hope to see you soon. 

WHOLESALE TO YOU 

BEST PRICES 

SHELDON CORD 

PRODUCTS 

2201 W. Devon, Chicago. 

Open 7 days 

(773) 973-7070. 



340 



Household 
Goods/ Furniture 



DESIGNER MODEL . 

HOMES FURNITURE ' 
CLEARANCE! 
Sofa/loveseat set, 
hunter green, $495. ■ 
Sofa, white, $350, 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: PlaldB, Florals, 

Leathers and More. 

Diningroom sets, 10-plece: * 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also; Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modelhomefumlturB.cdm 



Store Closing Sals . 
The Tiffany Galleries 
Mayfalr Mat) 

1-414-443-1203 
Gurneo mills 

847-856-0102 
We will be closing our 
doors and everything must 
go. You will find the best 
prices ever on furniture 
and Tiffany lamps. All fur- 
niture 25-75% off. All Tiffa- 
ny lamps 60% off our origi- 
nal low prices. Check out 
our unique furnishings at 
Incredible prices, hand 
carved benches, armoires, 
tables and chairs, enter- 
tainment centers, chests, 
book cases and much 
more. 

Everything must Got 



348 


Lavm/Gardcn 



HONDA SNOWBLOWER 
MODEL HS624. Track Drive 
6hp, like new, 5yrs. old, $825, 
Call (847) 223-3836 

SNOWTHROWER AT- 

TACHMENT FOR older 
John Deere 100 Series lawn 
tractor. (847) 381-8657. . 



349 



Clothing 



FUR FULL LENGTH ranch 
mink, sliver fox sleeves, size 
12, $2,500/best. . (262) 
697-0916. 



350 



Miscellaneous 

'■-> jlrlVCl 



BEANIE BABIES 
Brittanla Bears 

3100/each 
(647) 740-6426 

BICYCLE TRAVEL CASE, 

softstded, Bike Pro typo, with 
wheels, for airline travel, $180. 
Call (847) 91B-8112. 

GRAVITY EDGE WORK- 
OUT machine. Baby swing. 
Baby bassinet. Stroller/car- 
seat combo. All best offer. 
(847) 265-2155, 

HARTKE 7000 350W BASS 
AMP, $400. 4-12 Bass cabi- 
net, $250. Yamaha 16/4/2 mix- 
ing • board, $500. (847) 
477-4490 leave message. 

KENWOOD Home Surround 
Sound Stereo System w/6 4ft 
speakers, $600. OAK Dining- 
room Set, completo w/lop & 
bottom china hutch, $600. 
KING Loran Global Position- 
ing System, $400 

(815)385-0942 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 
SETTES, excellent condition. 
Over $500 value. Best offer. 
(847)516-3425. 

SAWMILL $3,795. SAWS 
logs into boards, planks, 
beams. Large capacity. Best 
sawmill values anywhere. 
Free Information. Norwood 
Sawmills, 252 Sonwil Drive, 
Buffalo, N.Y. 14226. 1-800- 
578-1363. 

VACUUM-GS4 Klrby, 

has all attachments. 
1983 Lincoln, 
good condition. 
847-823-5337. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



DIABETIC? DID YOU know 
that Medicare pays for diabe- 
tic testing supplies whether on 
Insulin or not? Call "today for 
free Info. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 1 -600-843-7038. (SCA 
Network). 

MEDICARE RECIPIENTS 
USING a NEBULIZER MA- 
CHINE! STOP paying full price 
for Albuterol, Alrovent, etc. so- 
lutions. MEDICARE will pay for 
them. Wo bill Medicare for you 
and ship directly to your door. 
MED-A-SAVE 1-800-538- 
9849 ext. 17J. 






January 28, 2000 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers / C23 



r 






358 



Musical 
Instruments 



500 



Homes For Sale 



PARACHO STRING QUI- 
TAR, $30. TKG 4-p!ece drum 
set - with 'cymbals; eoat, 
$300/be'sL Insstruments bast 
for 8-1 2yr. old, (847) 263- 
1646. ^_ 

PIANO KIMBALL OAK 
Spinet Piano In excellent con- 
dition, $1,200/best. (847) 
543-6911,(847)343-8779. 

WANTED DRUMS, GUI- 
TARS, Mandolins, Ukuleles, 
Bass Guitars. Pre 1975, Cash 
Paid. Ryan (262) 652-9967 
Kenosha, Wise. 



360 



Pets & Supplies 




500 



Homes For Sale 



AKC POMERANIAN PUP- 
PIES, ready now, vot ap- 
proved, 1st. shots, parents on 
premises. (847) 548-9044. 

AKC REG. POMERANIAN 
puppies, 2 males, 1 female, 
$300. each. 

847-740-2521 

AMERICAN PIT BULL 
puppies, 5-females, 3- 
males, brlndles, blacks and 
tans, family raised, parents on 
premises, S250/oa. (847) 
973-8722. 

BRnTANY AKC, great hunt- 
er or family dog, orange/liver, 
S400. (282) 781-1974 

DOG SITTING 

IN MY HOME. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 968-6319. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES out of Imported 
German bloodlines/Schutz- 
hund parents, M/F available. 
Call evenings (815) 
338-7887. 

GET HOOK, ROUND, tape- 
worms with rotational worm- 
ing. Use Happy Jack Tape- 
worm Tablets In rotation with 
Happy Jack Uqul-Vict. TSC 
TRACTOR SUPPLY AND 
I COUNTY COOPS, www.hap- 
pyjacklnc.com - 

LAB PUPPIES CREAM col- 
or, B/weeks, AKC, dew 
clawed, first shots. Parents on 
premisos. (262) 657-7079. 

LABRADOR PUPS AKC, 
.chocolate and black,- dow 
claws" removed,"$35Q-$400. 
(262) 694-3355. 

MILLENNIUM POODLE 

PUPS, 
AKC Sid. Poodle Pups, 8 

whs, 

male/Iemale, black, 12/wks 

old, $400 Cash. Call anytime 

(815) 458-9458 home 

(815) 341-7680 cell 

ROTTWEILER PUPPIES 
AKC, all female, 9/woeks old, 
good with kids, excellent Ger- 
man bloodlines, $350. (262) 
652-4279. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY PUP- 
PIES, 3-males, AKC, blue 
eyes, beautiful markings, first 
& second shots, wormed, 
$350, (847)263-1253. 

SUGAR GLIDERS RE- 
QUIRES commitment, seri- 
ous inquiries only. (262) 
697-0258. " " 

TWO GERBILLS COM- 
PLETE with colorful plastic 
cage, all accessories and 
food, $60. (847)263-1646, 



370 

• 


Wanted To Buy 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
AMY CONDITION- or 
Parti. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASH! Call 
(630)985-2742, 

WANTED TO BUY 1-10 
acres near Ill/Wise, border, to 
build storage building. Ask for 
Jared (414) 862-2517. 



ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP 
RENT with option. Owner Fi- 
nancing. Executive ranch, 2- 
1/2 acres with pond, 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, full base- 
ment, C/A, 2 wall-to-wall fire- 
places, large 2-car attached 
garage, hardwood floors, 7 
minutes lo Antloch Schools, 
shopping and Metre. 
$2,500/month, ' references, 
credit and $5,000 security de- 
posit, $298,000, $18,000 
down, finance balance, 3-5yr. 
balloon 8-3/4%, 20yr, amerlza- 
tion. Available 2/14.. (847) 
740-9557. 

BEAUTIFUL HOME IN 
ADAMS, WISCONSIN, 4-bed- 
room, 2-bath, 1 level, easy ac- 
cess. Family, daycare or 
' group home. 1-acre enclosed 

lot. $85,000. (60S) 764-1550. 

BEST VALUE IN LAKE 
COUNTY. Round Lake Park 
contemporary, 2-story, 4 -bed- 
room, 2.5 baths, 2400sq,ft. 
Musi see. Full finished base- 
ment, bllllardroom, glass block 
wet bar. Basement adds 
another 1,000sq.ft. 7yrs. 
young. $175,000. For Sale By 
Owner. (847) 740-^067. 

BURLINGTON TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-UNITS at 
1,8 50 sq.ft. each. 3 -bedrooms, 
2.5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, private wooded rear 
yard, will sell one or both, 
5112.000/ea. (414} 
763-6365. 

DIAMOND LAKE LAKE- 
FRONT 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath 
home. Many special features. 
Four season recreation. 
$368,900. (847) 566-7768. 

DREAMS DO ' COME 
TRUE! House For Sale By 
Owner. 9210 393rd. Ave,, 
Powers Lake, Knolls, Wiscon- 
sin. Newer raised ranch on 
wooded comer lot. Beautifully 
landscaped. 3-bedrooms, 2- 
full baths (1 with whirlpool 
tub), familyroom with oak man- 
tle fireplace, laundryroom, 
large eat-in kitchen with all ap- 
pliances, high efficiency fur- 
nace with central air, 200am p 
service, 2-car garage, 
I2lt.xi2lt. deck off kitchen, 
concrete drfve next to house 
for RV/boat. Plus 16x32 patio 
behind house. 10x14 barn 
■ shed enclosing - 4ft. i cyclone 
fenced yard. All this for only 
$160,000. No. Brokers Pleaso. 
Call Ray at (414) 279-5397, 

ELK GROVE BY OWNER 5- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, IMng- 
room, d I nlng room, f ami lyroom 
with fireplace. $259,900. (847) 
524-2730. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER, Oak 
Valley Estates, Spring Grove. 
Beautiful custom built 7yr. old 
home, 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, lull basement. A house 
you must see to appreciate, ail 
the quality features. Asking 
$249,000. For more details 
call (815) 938-9008. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 2- 
bedroom, 1-1/4 bath ranch 
with 2-car attached garage, lo- 
cated on 4 acres with 
3,000+pole bam, on Old 
Greenbay Rd. In Pleasant 
Prarie, Wisconsin. Easy ac- 
cess to 1-94 4 Hwy, 31 . Asking 
$215,000. (414) 694-0232 
after 5pm. ^^^ 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
MCHENRY Beautiful 2-story 
home, 4-bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 
3tcar garage on 1-1/2 acres. 
Cathedral ceilings, master su- 
ite, cedar decks, C/A, large 
gourmet kitchen. Many more 
upgrades, too much to list. A 
MUST SEE. Near Chain ol 
Lakes and RL 1 2 for easy com- 
muting. (815) 385-8468, 

RICHMOND FOUR BED- 
ROOM RANCH, 2-full baths, 
1-1/4 acres, must see. 
$195,900. All newly remo- 
deled. (815) 675-6282. 



2600 SQ.FT+ IN GRAYS- 
LAKE 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath; 2- 
story foyer, vaulted ceilings; 
open kitchen/famllyroom; ex- 
ercise room with skylights; 
$219,900. Call Joyce/John 
Freese REMAX SHOWCASE 
(847) 360-3311 ext. 218. 

65TH ST. 516, 2 unit, 2-bed- 
rooma each, with diningroom. 
No Realtors. $99,500. (414) 
657-6801. 

ANTIOCH LARGE 4-5 bed- 
room house, hardwood floors, 
on large lot, with 2-small 
bams, finished basement, 2- 
1/2 car attached garage, 3- 
carport, fenced-in backyard, 
needs little work, move- In con- 
dition, $125,000. (262) 
857-7771, (282) 945-3783. 



FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 1- 
balh (akefront house, 1hr. 
from Chicago on private is- 
land. Boat access only. Beauti- 
ful view of Meyers Bay. 
$99,900. (815) 363-1449, 
(847) 587-9476. 



FOX LAKE 2-STORY, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-baths, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, workroom, lake access, 
$129,900. Extra lot available. 
(647) 587-0925. 

FOX LAKE BY OWNER 
New 3/99, Raised ranch, 3- 
bedroom, 2-1/2 bath, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, sod, dock, woodbumlng 
fireplace, A/C, cathedral ceil- 
ing, $190K/negotlable. (847) 
587-4222. 



500 



Homes For Sole 



GAGES LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOMS, remodeled bath, no 
garage, no basement, newer 
roof, newer siding, lake rights, 
asking $110,000. : (847) 
548-6573. 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 
brick and' stucco,. 2-car at- 
tached garage, 5-bedrooms, 
4-baths, familyroom, formal di- 
ningroom, oak staircase and 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home In nice lo- 
cation, $335,000. (847) 
623-2870. 

GURNEE Adorable 1/2 acre 
wooded, mature perennials, 
low taxes, 3-bedrooms, *2- 
baths, 2-1/2 detached garage, 
$174,750.(847)244-3422. 

GURNEE OPEN SUNDAY 
12pm-4pm, 3-bedroom, 2-1/2 
bath, 24Q0sq.lt. (includes fin- 
ished basement with wind- 
ows), 3-car garage, cul-de- 
sac, $225,000. (847) 
855-1781. 

HOME FOR SALE On beau- 
tiful double lot, In West Milt- 
more neighborhood, 3-bed- 
room, 1 -newly remodeled 
bath, hardwood floors', de- 
tached 2.5-car garage, on 
quiet no thru street. $127,000. 
For more details call (847) 
356-0377. House shown by 
appointment only. ■ 

HOME FORECLOSURES 
NO MONEY DOWNI NO 
CREDIT NEEDEDI TAKEO- 
VER VERY LOW PAYMENTS. 
1-800-355-0024 ext. 8593. 
(SCA Network). 

HOMES FROM $5,000 

Foreclosed and repossessed. 

No or low down payment. 

Credit trouble O.K. 

For current listings call 

1-800-311-5048 

X8107. 

HOUSE FOR SALE BY 
OWNER 2- bedroom, ceramic 
lile bath, ilvingroom, kitchen, 
enclosed rear room, hot water 
heat, California closet inserts 
in large closets, heated and 
A/C 2-1/2 car garage; almost 
2/3 acre, shed in back. Allow- 
ance for Interior decorating. 
Fold down stairs leading to 
attic storage. West Antloch. 
Low taxes. MUST SELL! 
$99,000/best. (414) 

662-9662. 

JOHNSBURG 3-BED- 

ROOM RANCH, 1-bath, full 
finished walk-out basement, 
deck, wooded neighborhood, 
$118,900. (847) 497-9523. 

KENOSHA, WISC. 

RANCH, 3-bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, partially finished base- 
ment with workshop, fenced 
backyard, 1-1/2 detached ga- 
rage with attached shed, 
$109.500. (414) 942-1423. 

LAKE & MCHENRY & 
COOK CO. Free list of 
FHA/VA/Bank Foreclosures! 
Low down payments. Coldwell 
Banker (647) 222-6661. Se 
Hablo Espanol. '__ 

LAKE VILLA 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2-bath quad level on 
2-lots, 2-car garage, C/A, fire- 
place, above ground pool, 
. room off deck with hot tub, tak- 
erlghts to Chain. One year 
homo warranty Included. 
$168,900. (847) 356-8363. 



LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

II you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847)223-2691. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



UNDENHURST IMMACU- 
LATE 2-BEDROOM ranch, 
"with C/A, : full finished base- 
ment featuring: 3rd. bedroom, 
laundryroom, workshop and 
large familyroom. Lots of stor- . 
age. Custom deck, mature 
trees and landscaping. (847) 
356-0109. 



LAKEVIEW ON DOUBLE 
LOT in Paddock Lake, Wise. 
Enjoy privacy in Ihls 1600sq.ft. 
house surrounded by dead 
end streets and seasonal 
neighbors. 3-large bedrooms, 
1-1/2 baths and a fireplace! 
Roofs and 2 stage furnace are 
3yrs. new. Motivated sellers, 
priced to go last. Call Cindy for 
appointment (847) 650-3452 
or (847) 740-0007. 

UNDENHURST FOR 

SALE BY OWNER, raised 
ranch, 4-bedrooms, 2-full 
baths, 2-1/2 car detached 
HEATED garage, enough 
room for 2-cars and a boat, 
oak floors, crown molding, 
large deck, C/A. B.J. Hooper 
School/Grayslake High 

School. $159,900. Shown by 
appointment (647) 356-3546. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



UNDENHURST LAKE- 
FRONT PROPERTY NEW 
CONSTRUCTION CUS- 
TOM BUILT HOME 4-bed- 
room, full basement, formal 
living arid diningroom, family- 
room with fireplace, large 
kitchen with Island, master 
suite features whirlpool tub 
and cathedral ceiling, 2-story 
foyer, hardwood floors, 9ft. 
ceilings, close to forest pre-, 
serve, $329,000. (847) 
356-0962., '''.' : 

LOVELY 4-BEDROOM 
TRl-LEVEL, 1-bath, kitchen, 
has newer wood cabinets and 
floors, Includes refrigerator, 
stove and dishwasher. Newly 
painted. Finished lower level. 
Laundryroom includes washer 
and dryer, central air, Round 
Lake Beach. Asking $105,000. 
417 W. Beachvlew. (847) 
546-7627. 

MUNDELEIN FOR SALE 
BY OWNER, 214 N. Green- 
view Dr., maintenance free 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath ranch, 
fenced yard back to park, 2- 
car garage, central air, cus- 
tom blinds and newer wind- , 
ows throughout, $136,900. 
Call for appointment (847) 
566-6927, 

MUNDELEIN/LOCH LO- 
MAND BY OWNER, 3-bed- 
room remodeled ranch, with 
finished basement, 1 -block 
from private beach, $169,900. 
(847) 566-8042. 

NEAR GURNEE, ILLINOIS 

BY OWNER Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 2.5 bath, loft, base- 
ment, bar, fireplace, C/A, 
deck, fenced rear. $198,000. 
$12,000 below market (847) 
816-3798. Realtor gets In Jury. 
Possible owner financing. 

NORTHWEST NEWLY 

CONSTRUCTED 3-bed- 

room ranch, vaulted celling, 1- 
3/4 bath, 2-car garage, deep 
lot. $135,000. (414) 
553-9585. ' , \j- - 

OAKWOOD KNOLLS ANTI- 
OCH Great starter home for a 
young' family. 3-bedroom 
ranch In established, quiet 
neighborhood of Antloch, 1- 
1/4 bath, screened-in porch, a' 
nice sized kitchen, new wood 
floor, and a beautiful wood 
stove all make for a nice cozy 
feel. The 2-1/2 car detached 
garage, fenced backyard and 
a full basement give this home 
lots of room for you to grow 
into. Walk to beach at Cross 
Lake with playground and 
swimming, lots of kids at play 
In this neighborhood, great 
family atmosphere. Priced for 
quick sale @ $137,500 this 
one wonl last long... (847) 
838-3510. 

ON THE BOULEVARD 
Great Neighborhood 7816 
20th Ave., Kenosha. Wise 2* 
bedrooms, possible 3-bed- 
room ranch, Ilvingroom, fami- 
lyroom, large eat-in kitchen, 1* 
3/4 bath, 1-1/2 car garage, 
large fenced In yard, 

$105,900. (414) 658-2301. 

PELL LAKE, WISCONSIN 
Only 5 minutes to Illinois bor- 
der,' beautifully landscaped, 
1,500sq.fL, 3-bedroom, 1-1/2 
bath, raised rach, In very quiet 
neighborhood of newer 
homes, 6/yr. old home 
features a hobbyists 26x32 
dream garage, fully heated, 
.dry walled and Insulated, city 
water and sewer all connect- 
ed, price reduced to $129,900. 
Motivated. (414) 279-59B6. 

LAKE VILLA PRESTEGI- 
OUS CHESNEY SHORES 
1600sq.fi. ranch with targe 
room sizes. 3-bedrooms, 2-full 
baths (updated), L-shaped 
greatroom, familyroom with 
Lannon- Stone fireplace, C/A, 
new roof, 2- patios, beautiful 
lake view with water rights to 
Chain, low taxes, definitely not 
a drive-by, $159,000. Call (or 
appointment (B47) 356-3910. 

PREVIEW INSIDE OF MANY 

HOMES IN NORTHERN 

LAKE 

COUNTY IN THE COMFORT 

OF YOUR HOME GO TO: 

htlptfJOYCEFREESE. 

REALTOR.COM : 

ROUND LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1 full bath, newly re- 
modeled and new carpeting, 
$98,000. (847) 548-9980. 



SOUTHSIDE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH, with recroom . in 
basement,' newer carpeting In 
Ilvingroom, - hardwood floors in 
bedrooms, oversized garage. 
Many extras. (414) 694-5B96 
for appointment. 

SPRING GROVE FARM- 
HOUSE Charming 2-story on 
2,4 acres, 3-4 bedrooms, 2- 
baths, newly remodeled kitch- 
en and bath, flagstone fire- 
place. Must see. $215,000. 
(815) 675-9016. 



SPRING GROVE HAVE 
kids or like to entertain? No 
problem in this 4-bedroom, 3- 
bull bath home on 1 acre, 3- 
car garage, roomy eat-In kitch- 
en, diningroom, large living- 
room, familyroom with brick 
fireplace. Backyard Includes 
cedar shed, 3-seasons gaze- 
bo with electric, large deck, 
large patio and wood swing 
set Asking $228,000. (815) 
675-1604. 

SPRING GROVE METICU- 
LOUS stone cedar custom 
built home, 4-bedrooms, 4- 
baths, on 1.5 wooded acres, 
3. 3 00 sq.ft., walk-out base- 
ment, open loft overlooking 
greatroom with stone fire- 
place, 2-whlrlpool baths, wrap 
around deck, 3.5 car garage, 
upgrades galore. By owner 
$339,000. (B1 5) 675-3800. 

SPRING GROVE WATER- 
FRONT, nice 1 -bedroom cot- 
tage with fireplace, also large 
fenced-in backyard, plus boat 
dock, owner financing, 
$89,900. 10% down, 
$750/month. (B47) 497-3256, 
(847) 988-2078. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNETI Visit 
ht1p://www. Ipnews.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, In 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15c each 
additional word. 

WAUKEGAN THREE BED- 
ROOMS, 2-1/2 baths, 2-car 
attached garage, park like lot, 
1 acre, 2800sq.ft., $193,000. 
(647)623-3105. 

THREE-FOUR- BEDROOM 
HOUSE, large fenced yard, 
Grayslake area Schools. (847) 
231-5166. ■ - 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN cedar and brick 3-bed- 
room ranch home, livingroom, 
diningroom, kitchen, family- 
room, den, 1.75 baths, full 
English basement, huge 2- 
tiered deck, 3-car garage, 1.3 
wooded acres with thousands 
in professional landscaping, 
immaculate inside .and out. 
Highly rated Randall Grade 
School. For appointment call 
(262) 877-9620, ' 

VA/HUD REPOSI 

New Hats weekly. 

Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 

"Your Repo Specialists." 

(847) 526-0300. 



VERNON HILLS DEER- 
PATH 4-bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 
2.5 ' car garage, hardwood 
floors, many recent upgrades, 
excellent family neighbor- 
hood/schools, $225,900. 

(847) 680-3652. 

VINTAGE BEAUTY, 
GREAT Waukegan neighbor- 
hood, 3-bedrooms, hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace, cen- 
tral 'air, $134,900. (847) 
662-5942, 

WAUCONDA FOR SALE by 
owner, 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 
Call for Info. Days (847) 296- 
0302, evenings (847) 
526-4522. ask for Miko. 

WAUKEGAN 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3.5 bath, 2.5 car at- 
tached garage. 3,000sq.tl., on 
dead end street, fireplace, 
cathedral ceilings, must see, 
$245,000. Call Larry (847) 
249-5245. 

WILL BUY OR LEASE 

YOUR HOUSE 

Any area, condition, or price. 

(647)973-1193, 

WONDER LAKE RAISED 
ranch, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths. 
' C/A, fenced yard, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, quiet street $119,000. 
(800) 244-7920 ext 213. 

WOODSTOCK JUST 

MOVE in, |ust off historic 
square, 2-bedroom, new roof, 
windows, carpet, paint, deck, 
hot water heater. Close to eve- 
rything. $89,900. Call Kevin 
fB15) 337-9044. 



Gov't Foreclosures Sale 

Wdukepn, Zio'n, Round Lake, 

McHcnry & other areas, j 

From $52,000 & up! 

Low down/make ofTer! 

Western Realty 

1 -630-495-61 00 



ROUN0LAKE 

BEACH $90s 

6 rms,3bdrms, 

new kit/bath!! 

Ig.lot.NewHT/CA. 

Must sell! 

GATEWAY REALTY 

CALL MARY 
C773) T75-4440 



♦FORECLOSED 
HOMES * 

LOW OR $0 DOWN 
Govt & Bank Repos 

being sold nowl 

Financing available! 

Local listings. 

1-800-501-1777, 

ext. 9203 



504 


Homes For Rent 



AVAILABLE NOW OLD 
Mill Creek (Mlllbum) Very 
roomy 4-bedroom, 2-bath, liv- 
ingroom, diningroom, sitting- 
room, and mudroom. Refer- ■ 
ences, credit check and de- 
posit required, S1,100/morrth, 
tenant pay utilities. Call Cathy 
(847) 244-5330. 

DOWNTOWN GRAYSLAKE, 
1 -bedroom, $565/month, 
2-bedroom with Jacuzzi, 

$765/monlh, . 

3'bedroom, $875/month. 

ROOMS FOR RENT 

$90/weekty. 

(847) 367-1360, 

pager (847) 335-4800 

Vouchers and Certificates . 
' accepted. 

GURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 

2.5 bath, nice neighborhood, 
all appliances, IMngroom with 
| fireplace, masterbedroom 
;• with soaker tub, 2-car garage, 
20x20 deck looks out to na- 
ture pres. and trait. Woodland 
Schools. Pels considered. 
$1,900/month + deposit. (847) 
543-9882. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 2- 

bedroom, 1-bath, large 
fenced yard, alt appliances. 
Remodeled. No pets. No Sub- 
sidles. $750/month. Available 
February 1st. (847) 
543-8411. ■ 

ROUND LAKE PARK, 
SMALL PETS WELCOMED 

3-bedroom Cape Cod, 1-balh, 
2 fenced-in yards. - New fur- 
nace/AC. $975/month plus util- 
ities and security deposit. 
Lease with option to buy avafl- 
able. (847) 740-8557. 

WILLIAMS BAY, WISCON- 
' SIN, .SMALL 3-bedroom, 5 
minutes to lake, furnished or 
unfurnished, private country 
setting, $500-$525. (847) 
498-1418. 



514 



Condo 
Town Homes 



CONDO FOR SALE Vaca- 
tion Village, Fox Lake, 1 -bed- 
room Clipper, pool, marina, 
security gate, $39,000/best. 

(847)587-1109. 

UBERTYVILLE 
FOR RENT 

2 bedroom condo close to 

downtown shopping & Metra. 

saesymo. No pets. 

847-360-8842 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath town- 
house for rent, $84S/month 
plus utilities, security deposit, 
(847) 824-4281 leave mes- 
sage 

TOWNHOME 3 BEDROOM, 
2.5 bath finished lower level, 
2 car garage, oak trim 
throughout, central air, cathe- 
dral celling on upper level. 
Asking $165,000. Golf 
course community/Wads- 
worth. For more Informa- 
tion/appointment for viewing. 
847-782-1105 

VERNON HILLS TOWN- 
HOUSE FSBO, 3-bedroom, 1- 
car attached garage, new car- 
pet, all appliances included, 
excellent condition, great loca- 
tion next to playground. 
Hawthorn Schools. $96,900. 
(847)680-7832. 



514 


Condo/Town 
Homes 


MMAMHHMflefltCJM 

WAUKEGAN 2-BED- 
ROOM, 3-LEVEL condo, 
fully 1 finished, basement, Cen- 
tral air/heating, $82,500. (847) 
625-5280. 


518 


Mobile Homes 



MOBILE 1990 CARROLL- 
TON, double wide, Kenosha, 
newly carpeted; air, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-balhs, natural, fire- 
place, deck, shed, $35,900. 
(262) 552-7666. 

MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell, 
$3,750/besL (708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 3-BED- . 
ROOM, new furnace, central 
air, large kitchen, targe living- 
room, large shed. A Must see. 
$14,500.(262)942^1111, 

moduLars dou- 
blew1des • singlewides 
- illinois largest dis- 
play of model homes, 
foundations,. base- 
MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-600- 
798-1541. 

OAKDALE ESTATES 
HWY. KR & I-94, Kenosha. 
1986 North American, 16x80, 
2-bedrooms, centra) air, shed, 
deck, all appliances Included, 
attractive lot, $32,900. (414) 
679-0079. 

PATHFINDER 12X60, 2- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath, larger 
livingroom, and 10x8 utility 
shed, all appliances included, 
$6,500/besL (262) 597-9543, 
pager (262) 494-2124. 

ROUND LAKE DOUBLE 

wide, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
livingroom, diningroom, fami- 
lyroom, low property taxes, 
1st. 6/months lot rental free, 
$30,000. (847) 265-8068. 



SHORECREST 
BEDROOM, 

S10,000/best. 
654-8818. 



POINT 2- 

14x70. 

(414) 



UNION GROVE 1972 Rollo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition, 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck. 2 sheds, Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking $27,000/besL 
(414) 878-2726. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Located In an over 

55 community. 

NEWLY DECORATED 

1990 1 -bed room, 

1-1/2 bath, with carport 

and shed. $39,900. 

1990 1 -bedroom, 

1-1/2 bath, with carport, 

and shed, $29,900. 

1995 2-bedroom, 

2-bath, with garage, 

carport and shed, $56,900. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



A DETAILED 1, 2 & 3 bed- 
room apartments and also stu- 
dio in a well mintalned brick, 
refin.- mahogany, solid plaster, 
3 closets, dining, air, laundry, 
parking. Hard to find quality at 
$535. (847) 910-1389. 

CLEAN , 1-BEDROOM, 

2ND floor apartment In 
Round Lake, 5495/month plus 
security deposit. Available 
January 1st. (847) 546-8730. 

FOX LAKE STUDIO newly 
remodeled. Murphy bed. Stor- 
age unit, pool, tennis, biking, 
marina. Ideal for single, 
$470/monlh + utilities. (847) 
587-5301. 

FOX LAKE 

VACATION VILLAGE, 

LARGE STUDIO 

APARTMENT, 

BEAUTIFUL 

SURROUNDINGS, 

SECURITY ENTRANCE, 

$470/MONTH 

PLUS UTJUTIES. 

NO PETS. 
(847)223-1131. 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

KENOSHA SPACIOUS 3- 
BEDROOM apartment In 2- 
flat building, off street parking,, 
near Metra and lake, 
$685/month. (262) 656-8897. 



! 



-I 



C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 




r anuary28, 2000 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



KENOSHA, Wl„ 5237-41 
Ave. 1BR sido-by-slde du- 
plex. Appliances included, 1 
car attached garage, 
lawn/snow removal. Full 
bsmt. No pets. Month to 
month. $625/mo. Call 262- 
694-9777 Until 5:30pm; 262- 
694-0061 or 262-694-2494. 

ANTIOCH ' LAKEFRONT 

NEW 1-bodroom, furnishQd 
apartment,- Includes utilities, 
plus your own washer/dryer, 
private area. Available March 
1st. $650/monlh. (847) 
838-0583. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
$645-$760/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
355-5474. 

LONG LAKE, 1 bdrm. apt., all 
uills. tncl., $600. mo. Avail. 
Feb. 1st. 

Call 847-546-4407 

PLEASANT PRAIRIE/NO 
DEPOSIT SHORT TERM 
LEASE, 2 BDRM, HEATED 
GARAGE. 950/MO. (262) 
942-5028, • 

STOP RENTING!! OWN for 
less. $0 Down. No credit need- 
ed. Guaranteed approval. 1* 
800-360-4620 ext. 8203 (SCA 
Network). 



.WACONDA 3-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT. LargB rooms, 
first floor. Stove, refrigerator, 
washer and dryer.. Available 
Immediately. $900/month. 
(847) 3B1-3846. 



WAUCONDA 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, heat and hot 
water Included, $565/month 
plus security deposit and 
lease. No pets. References. 
Available Immediately. (847) 
433-0891. 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Cozy Studio apartment 

Includes all utilities. 

Availablo February 1st. 

No pets. 

S570/month plus security. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



ZION 1-BEDROOM, EAST 
SIDE, first floor unit with front 
porch, $445/month plus elec- 
tric and gas, no pets. (847) 
831-53B8. 



ZION 3-BEDROOM, EAST 
SIDE, heat paid, new kitchen 
cabinets, no pets. S745/month 
plus electric. (847) 831-5388. 



g "Dtcowc* "Do. Cimce Tiue! -*£^ 

'& A Place To Call Homef 






-K: 




1 & 2 Bdrm sjvcojs uoor plans 

ON-Snt 24-1 KXJR EMERGENCY MMNT. 
SaTILUTC TV NW' AVAILABLE 

• LAUNDKV FACILITIES "J^ 

• CONVENIENT TO METRA A 

• BEAUnrUUY MANICURED grounds 

• Flcxihlc leasing 



■■»*- 



Uvnnoi 
Im a n ii rJ 



445 Donin Dr. 
Anlioch, IL 

(847) 395-0949 



$ * 



Deep Lade Hcimi'age 

149 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Lake Villa. IL 

(847) 356-2002 






OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS , 



Offering Affordable Homing for Qualified Applicants, 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1, 2 & 3 Red roam Apartments 

Wheel-chair accessible, I bedroom, 

Stop in at: 

2*>*> Oakxidgc Court in Antioch 

Or call: 
fst 847-395-4840 

bsb 1-800-52 6-0844 TDD 



MuuKrd by McrklUn Group, Inc. 



£v\I/a!> 



Lakcwood Village Apartments 



In Island Lake and Grayslake 

Offering affordable housing for qualified applicants. 
Now accepting applications for our: 



• 1,2 and 3 bedroom apartments 
Wheel-chair accessible, i bedroom 



Please call fpr more information or appointment ac 
(847) 223-6644 
TDD# (800) 526-0844 f=t 



w$m 



Meridian Group, Inc. 



C3»— 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To Share 



528 



Apt/Homes 
To SJiorc 



UTILITIES PA1DII 
Roommates Wanted. 

Newer home, 

clean, nice rooms. 

Good location. 

Call Mason (847) 746-2577. 

M. Mason Enterprises, Inc. 

GAGES LAKE HOME near 
CLC, $425/month. All utilities 
Included except phone. Must 
be responsible. Ages 18-30. 
(847) 543-0839. 



LOOKING FOR FEMALE 
ROOMMATE, early 20's, re- 
sponsible, easy going, to 
share 2-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath 
townhouse. $500/month 

Washer/dryer, vaulted ceil- 
ings, fireplace, C/A. Very nice 
Grayslake neighborhood. No 
furniture necessary, only for 
bedroom. Jennifer (847) 
223-^988 



HdoMMATE WANTEO 

•Looking for 3rd. parson to 
share house In Fox Uko* 
$400/month + 1/3 Utilities, full, 
kitchen end laundry. Available 
Immediately. (847) 587-6443. 



SEEKING RESPONSIBLE 

INDIVIDUAL to share 2-bed- 
room home In Wlnthrop Har- 
bor. $500/month plus security. 
Includes all utilities except 
phone. References required. II 
interested call (647) 731-3860. 

WANTED * RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON to share 3-bedroom 
house In McHenry, 

$400/month + 1/2 utllllles. 
Non-smoking. - (815) 

759-9204. 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



TWO ROOMS AVAILABLE 

FOR RENT 

In largo Lake Villa homo, 

off Rt. 69 & 132, 

fully furnished, 

$375-$400/month. 

1-800*2 5 5-4 85 9 

oxt.4689, 
(847)073-0128, } ' 
.<4JflBBtMQ1&< \ 

--PT-. ■ --,'•■ 



534 



Business Property 
' For Sale 



IDEAL BUSINESS LOCA- 
TION Heart of downtown Mu- 
ndeleln. Formerly an op- 
tometrists office for 20yrs., 
currently used as Real Estate 
Appraisal office. Approximate- 
ly 900sq.ft. house wilh full un- 
tinlshed basement, vary high 
visibility location, 50x1 50ft. 
site, plentiful convenient on 
site parking. House has new 
roof, new insulated windows, 
new furnace, new C/A/C, 
newly fenced backyard, 1-car 
detached garage, .6 miles to 
Metro. $149,900. (847) 
949-5327, 



PLANTATION, FL 

Executive Office Park 

w/retall. 134K sf. 

$9.7 Mil. 
561-347-2760. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



;F6ifiiIica»S 



New Building 

(2) -1800 sq.ft. 

Industrial Warehouses. 

Round Lake Industrial rant 

2-i ft. ceiling, fenced yard. 

12 It. overhead door. 

8-17-546-1474 



LANDSCAPE 
CONTRACTOR 

2400 Sq. Ft. Pole Bam 

plus acreage 

for growing product 

In 

Richmond. 

Negotiable. 

Land 
Management 

815-678-4334 




SIX APARTMENT UNITS 

All brick with garages, North 
side Waukegan, good cash 
flow. No contracts. (847) 
662-3241. 



Tppi^e|t\*dwHr) 

Lekelaford wewspapejrs 

Cali;fl47#23.816f 



-: — 



f 



NEW GLARUS, Wl. Take 
the scenic drive thru the 
hills & valleys of S. Wis- 
consin. Exc business 
opptys In America's Little 
Switzerland, 3 hra to Chgo. 
Offering the rapidly expand- 
ing New Qlarus Primoroso 
Winery which features like 
now apt, retail space & 
wine making. Other comm'l 
proprty for sale incl. supper 
ctutx restaurant & conven 
fonca store. 
Uonhardt-Juglurn Realty 



603-527-2555. 



560 



Vacant Lot 
Acreage 



FOX LAKE - 

NEW 

LAKE VIEW 

OFFICES 

ON GRAND AVENUE. 

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE. 

(847)587-1615. 

GRAYSLAKE DOWN- 

TOWN 1 500sq.lt. Center 
Street Storefront. Also 

765sq.tt., downtown store/of- 
fice for rent, -1200sq.fi. shop 
space for rent. Call for details, 

(847) 604-3295. 

INDUSTRIAL/WAR- 
EHOUSE SPACE WITH of- 
fiCO, (262) B43-3705. 

ISLAND LAKE COMMER- 
CIAL SPACE In prime loca- 
tion, 400sq.ft. on main floor, 
4 oosq.tt. on lower level, 
S695/monlh. (847) 526-5755 
days, (847) 526-8306 even- 
ings. 

MUNDELEIN OFFICE 

SPACE Centrally located, 
600sq.ft., easy access. Plenty 
of parking. Low utility bills, 
S600/month. (847) 680-9824. 



WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
LOCATED ON MAIN 
STREET . . 1200SQ.FT. 
BUSINESS WITH OFFICE, 

$785/month plus ullllllos. 
Available Immediately. (847) 
526-5000, leave mes- 
sage. 

i luiii i iimiwmiHiuM 

WAUCONDA RETAIL/OF- 
FICE SPACE, approximately 

Q00sq.fi., Main Street location, 
ample parking. Availablo 
2/1/00, $700/monlh. Call Bob 
Olsen (847) 526-5101. 



BUILD TO SUITI TREVOR, 
WISCONSIN 1/2 acre parcel, 
private well on sewer. (414) 
862-2197. , 

DAVIS, ILLINOIS CORN- 
ER oversized (113x197) lake- 
view lot In Lake Summerset. 
Boating, fishing, pool, parks. 
Low taxes.- $32,000. (773) 
622-2276. 

FIVE-NINE ACRE HOME- 
SITES, near Wllmol, Wiscon- 
sin from 589,000. Some wood- 
ed and walk-outs. Horses/pole 
buildings OK. Owner will 
finance, $2,000 down © 6%. 
(815)678-4228, 

HALF ACRE LOT FOR 
SALE Private cul-de-sac, 
city sewer, well water, 2 
miles North of Antioch on 
Rt. 83. Call for Info. Must 
SOB. (815) 344-8883. 

LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove, $2,000 
down, no Interest or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash. Call owner (815) 
678-^228. 

POPLAR GROVE, ILLI- 
NOIS Double lot on North 
Main Street. Residential. 
$45,0OO/negotlable. (815) 
765-2133. 

UNIQUE FARMETTE 

HEARTLAND Township 

Countryside Two residences 
on 9.4+acres, horse barn wilh 
4 1st. class stalls and drive-In 
hay loft, fenced arena end 
turnout, new 3 stall garage + 2 
drive-in sheds. Farm house 
modernized, 3-bedroom, 1- 
bath, basement, high off. heat, 
farm size kitchen, laundry, 
deck. Second house, 1 -bed- 
room, LR dinette, oak kitchen, 
utility room, large deck, zoned 
A2, Immediate occupancy. 
More acreage available. Miles 
of vistas across open fields 
and Klshwaukee stream, 
$285,000. (815) 943-9892 or 
(608) 723-2795. 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Ren lab 



#1 CAMPGROUND MEM- 
BERSHIP AND TIMESHARE 
RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. 
DONT WANT YOURS? 
WE'LL TAKE IT. BUY1 SELL1 
RENT! RESORT SALES INTL 
,.1-800-423i5987. 

CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP COAST-TO-COAST 
Travel America Resort Parks 
International (RPI), home 
park, sparkling springs, near 
Rockford, III. $800, seller will 
pay transfer fees. (414) 
694-5253. 



568 



Out Of Area 
Property 



SOUTHERN COLORADO 
RANCH SALE 40AC/WELL - 
$36,900. Enjoy sensational 
sunsets over the Rockies and 
views of Pikes Peak on gently 
rolling terrain. Long road fron- 
tage, tolo & elec. Ideal for 
horses. Exc. financing. Call 
now 719-676-6367 




fV 



1982 24FT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON BOAT, Includes chairs 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (847) 
395-8637. 

1068 32FT. MOTOR- 
HOME, now tires, queen rear 
bed, excellent condition, 
55,000 miles, $20,900. (847) 
546-6141. 

1990 ROCK WOOD 25FT. 
TRAILER, easy tow, triple 
bunks, sleeps 6-7, loaded ex- 
tras, never used, $10,000. 
(847)390-0717. 

CAMPING TRAILER 1987 
YELLOWSTONE, 24ft., en- 
closed, central air, 
$4,500/best. (847) 746-3686. 



LAYTON 1993 TRAVEL 
TRAILER 26ft., front bedroom, 
rear bunk, sleeps 8, full bath, 
awning, A/C, hitch Included, 
$8,900.(847)249-0166. 



MOTORHOME 1995 

PACE Arrow, 33ft., Chev 454, 
under 20K miles, fully loaded, 
sleeps 4, Includes car caddy 
and hitch, $84,500. (847) 
623-4874. 



SOUTHWlND 1985, 27FT. 
Class A MH, fully self-con- 
tained, very clean 
511,000/beat. '" (847) 

882-3837. 




1998 POLARIS XCR 600, 
good condition, many extras, 
roady to ride, $3,000. 
(847)395-7306 

NEW SNOWMOBILE 1990 
Skl-Doo MXZ600, never used, 
$5,000. (262) 653-1727, 

(847) 638-5898. . 

POLARIS 1987 INDY 600. 
1990 Polaris 500. (262) 
653-0289. 

POLARIS 1994 XLT, 
$2,350. 1995 Arctic Cat 
580ZR, Just studded, $2,700. 
Both wilh low miles and mint 

condition. (847) 587-9825. 

POLARIS STORM 1996, 
.low mllkes, excellent condi- 
tion, many extras, with 2- place 
trailer, $3,600. (262) 

B77-866G. 

SNOWMOBILE 1996 SKI- 
DOO FORMULA Z583, 2500 
miles, excellent condition, ask- 
Ing $3,200. (262) 859-1 843. 




1991 YAMAHA SUPER JET 
(stand-up), like now, under 
50hrs. with Karavan Trailer. 
Wet suit Must see. Must sell. 
$1,600/best. Waterford area 
(414)514-2474. 

CHRIS CRAFT. 1056 18ft. 
Continental, like new condi- 
tion, appraised at $15,000- 
$18,000. Best offer. (708) 
447-^3216. 

SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pellers, ski vests, accessories. 
(B15) 365^1729. 

SYLVAN 1990 SPORT 
TROLLER, 1989 Suzuki 25hp 
MK auto pilot, 2-MK anchor 
mates, extra prop, cover, 
Shoreland Trailer, extras, 
$3,0O0/best. (847) 265-8398. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



SNOWBOARD 1097 NO 
Llmltz-Ed Dubrowski pro 
model 147-1997 Burton cus- 
tom free style bindings, $250. 
(282)' 862-2568. 

TRANSPORTATION 



724 


Airplanes 



1946 LUSCHOMBE BA, 

65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and files 
great. 516,500. (414) 
248-8702. 




187B TRANS AM, 10th anni- 
versary Silver Edition, all 
power, 403 engine, automat- 
ic iransmlsslon.$2,500. 
1976 thru '89 

Trans Am parts & misc. call 
wilh noeds. 847-458-1812 

1984 BMW 528E, 6-cylin- 
der, automatic, 4-door, sun- 
root, new tiros, brakes and ex- 
haust, excellent condition In- 
side/out, silver with black 
leather, $2,800/best. (847) 
9B7-9637. 

19B5 FORD CROWN VtC, 
LTD Wagon, excollent run- 
ning, 1,200. 

(847) 634-9088 



804 



Girs For Sale 



HYUNDAI 1995 EXCEL 2- 
door hatchback, 67,000 miles, 
A/C, automatic, am/fm radio; 
new tires and brakes, 
$3,000/best. (847) 680-0307 
after 6pm, 

B50 1097 4-DOOR, 

$18,995. (847) 362-9200. . 

AUDI 00, 1990, $3,995. 
(847) 625-8400. 

AUDI A41990, $5,995. 
(847) 662-2400. 

BERETTA 1005 Z26 

$7995 526-2424 

BMW 525I, 6-SPEED, 

black, leather Interior, power 
sunroof, 82K miles, excellent, 
$13,900. (262) 633-8771. 

BUICK 1985 CENTURY, 4- 
door, only 64,000 miles, Sony 
CD player, A/C, power wind- 
ows/locks/seats, $2,500/best. 
(847) 837-9351. 

BUICK 1086 REGAL, 
power everything, like new, 
must see, $3,000. (262) 

652-1360. 

BUICK 1090 REGAL, 
52,995. (847) 856-3000. 

CAPRICE 1908 $11,995 
526-2424 ^^^ 

CAVALIER 1007 2- DR. 
$7995. 847-526-2424 

CHEVY 1981 CAMARO, re- 
built motor, new battery, some 
rust. (262) 652-3473. 

CHEVY 1987 Cavalier $595 

FORD 1BB7 Tempo $595 

CHEVY 1978 Suburban 

4x4 $995 

Just plain, simple, reliable 

vehicles, winter or summor. 

(815) 385-0942 __ 

CHEVY 1900 LUMINA, all 
power equipped, clean In and 
out, no rust, 89K. Must see. 
(847) 973-8771 after 6pm. 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 

86,000 miles, fair condition, 
but runs great, $2,900. 1989 
Yamaha Excitor snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (847) 
740-2219. 

CHEVY 1991 CAVALIER, 
good shape, $2,000. (847) 
395-8258 after 5pm. 

CHEVY 1094 . CORSICA, 
$4,995. (847) 662-2400; 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
power steering, A/C, 73,000 
miles, $7,000. (414) 
862-9731. 

CHEVY 1008 METRO LSI 4- 
DOOR, $8,995. (847) 662- 
2400. 

CHEVY CAMARO CONVT., 
1995 $11,995. (847)623-3000 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
Bodies. Factory-new. Guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. 
Doors from $89.00, Fenders 
from $50.00, Beds from 
$800.00, Bedllners $169.00. 
BUMPERS, GRILLS, RE- 
PAIR PANELS. PAINTS, 
ABRASIVES. WIND- 

SHIELDS, RADIATORS. De- 
livery. MARX 217-824-6184. 

CHRYSLER 1994 LEBAR- 
ON CONVT., $6,995. (847) 
625-8400. 

CHRYSLER 1996 SE- 

BRING CONV., $11,995. 
(847) 662-2400. 




' Send us ii picture mid maybe your cat will be the next 

<WW» * v j>ET OF THE WEEK! 

Send'Us t your,!favorite photo and any Information aboul Ihe pet 

you would like to see mentioned to Lakeland Publishers, 

AW»; Classified PET OF THE WEEK, P.O. Box 268, 

Groyslake, Illinois 60030, Sorry, pholos cannot be returned. 

All Information Is subjeel to editing. 



804 




DODGE ' 1095 NEON; 
$5,200.(847)623-1492. 

DODGE 1006 NEON, 

$6,000. (847) 623-1492. " T 

DODGE 1996 STRATUS 

SE, $6,995. (847) 856-3000. 

DODGE 1997 NEON, 
$7,995, (847) 662-2400. : . ,. 

DODGE 1997 RAM SLT 
4x4, 49,000 miles, brand new 
cap, $16,500. (262) 857-4102 
evenings please. 

DODGE INTREPID 1994, 
$7.395, (B47)623-3000 

DODGE SHADOW ES 1904 

$4.495.(847)623-3000 ' 

DODGE STRATUS .1099, 
$12,995.(847)623-3000 

EAGLE TALON 1992, 
auto., sunroof, bra, very clean 
Inside and out, $4,500. Call 
eves. (847)587-1737. 

ECLIPSE 1002 GS 

$5995. 847-526-2424 

EL CAMINO 1986 Candy 
Apple Red, V8, automatic, 
bucket seats, power windows 
and doors, $10,000. (414) 
694-3573, 6018 69th St. 

FORD 10B6 ESCORT EXP, 
5-speed manual, high miles, 
good runner, no rust, 
$600/0051. (262) 723-5976. 

FORD 108B STATION 
WAGON, automatic, runs 
groat, $800. If Interested we 
can meet at Super- Kmart, 
Round Lake. (262) 862-2321. 

FORD 1095 TAURUS, A/C, 
P/S, P/B, 74K miles, best offer. 
(847)223-8816. 

FORD 1996 RANGER EX- 
TENDED CAB, $9,995. (847) 
662-2400. 

FORD 1996 TAURUS, 
$8.995. (847) 662 2400. 

FORD 1097 TAURUS, 
$8,995. (B47) 662-2400. 

GET A REPOSSESSED VE- 
HICLE FOR AS LOW AS $69 
Now thru Saturday 1/29. Call 
Union Nissan/Truck World. 
(847) 244-8000. ,_ 

HONDAS FROM $200 Po- 
lice Impounds; and; tax repos. 
All makes and models avail- 
able. CALL NOWI 1-800-772- 
7470 ext. 7040 (SCA Network). 

INFINITI 1006 G20, 

$10.995. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI 1998 I30, 

$21,995.(847)362-9200. 

INFINITI I30T, 1099, 
$26,495. (847) 362-9200. 

INFINITI Q45 1907, 

$29,995. (847) 362-9200. - 

KIA SEPHIA 1998, $8,995. 
(847) 662-2400. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to placo an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

Wo will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

tax our 24-hour fax line at . 

(847)223-2691. 

MERCURY 19BB COUGAR, 
3.8 liter, power everything, 
new custom paint and sun- 
roof, 68K miles. $4,700 or 
best. 
(847) 838-6994 __ 

MERCURY 1991 CAPRI 
CONV., $4,095. (847) 662- 
2400. 

MERCURY 1993 CAPRI 
XR-2 CONV., $4,995. (847) 
662-2400. __ 

MERCURY 1097 COU- 
GAR, $11,995. (847) 856- 
3000. ] 

MERCURY COUGAR 
1990, 122,000 miles, runs, 
great, new automatic trans- 
mission, $1,975/best. (847) 
566-2394. 

METRO 1994 $2995. 
847-526-2424 



MITSUBISHI 1993 
ECLIPSE, $2,995. (847) 62- 
1492. 

MITSUBISH1 1008 MIRAGE 
$8995 526-2424 



NEED A CAR? 

NEED CREDIT? 

Call 888-24 APPROVE 

Mr. Kayo has placed more 

people In need of credit In 

vehicles than anyone 

Inthearoal 






i 



' 



;- 



f t.3 






. 






i 



January 28, 2000 





fB&E&Stfigjg&S 



CLASSIFIED 







Lakeland Newspapers / Cm 



804 



Cars For Sale 



NISSAN 1093 ALTIMA 
GXE, aulomatlc, A/C, cruise, 
am/fm cassette, ■ ASS, 
S6,500/be5l, (847) 548-4812. 

NISSAN 1998 SENTRA, - 
S8.995, (847) 625-8400.-^ 

NISSAN 1007 SENTRA 
GXE, $9,795. (847) 656-3000. 

NISSAN 1997 SENTRA, 
$9,895, (847( 362-9200. 

NISSAN 1999 ALTIMA 
QXE, $15,405. (847) 362- 
9200. 

OLDS 1095 CIERA SEDAN, 
37,995,(847)856-3000. 

OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME 

1994 $6.995. (847)623-3000 

OLDSMOBILE 98, 1984. A 
real looker! Champagne color, 
automatic everything, looks 
great Inside and out. Excellent 
runner, mechanically sound. A 
real steal at $2,200. Call (262) 
654-6543 ask for Susan,. 

PONTIAC 1977 TRANS 
AM 400 automatic, very clean, 
only 50,000 miles, never seen 
snow, $7,000. (847) 
360-9674. 

PONTIAC 1991 GRAND 
AM, $2,995. (847) 856-3000. 

PONTIAC 1003 BONNE- 
VILLE, $6,995. (847) 856- 
3000. 

PONTIAC 1900 GRAND 

AM, $7,995. (847) 625-8400. 

PONTIAC 1006 GRAND PRIX 
$9995. 847- 526-2424 

PONTIAC 1997 SUNFIRE 
SE, $7,995. (847) 856-3000. 

PONTIAC 1990 SUNFIRE 
GT, $13,995. (847) 856-3000. 

PORSCHE 924 1988, 
$4,995. (647) 662-2400, 

PRIZM 1990 $12,749 
526-2424 

AUTO AUCTION., 
. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 
SALVATION ARMY 
Now Every Saturday 

9am. 

Over 100 to bo fold 

weekly to the highest 

bidder. 

Opening bid $100. 

,som<- i . a no ntmmr v - ; 

' Grand opening at our new 

location In Waukegan on 

Rtel20, one block east of 

Groonbay Road. 

(847)862-0100 



SATURN SL1 1995, 

$6,995. (847) 662-2400. 

TOYOTA 1991 CAMRY, 

$5.995. (B47) 625-8400. 

TOYOTA 1991 TERCEL, 2- 

door, 84K, 1 -owner, garage 
kepi. $2,500. (847) 782-1735. 

TOYOTA COROLLA 1993 
$5,995. (847)623-3000 

TRANS AM 1975-89 mis- 
cellaneous parts. Call with 
needs. 1979 10lh Anniversary 
Trans Am, 403 auto., all pow- 
er. $2,500. (B47) 458-1812. 

WOTS WAGON 1998, 
$28,495. (847) 362-9200. 



VOLVO 1996 850 WAGON, 
$20,850. (847) 362-9200. 

VOLVO 1997 850 WAGON, 
$21.995. $362-8200. 

VOLVO 1997 S90, $21,995. 
(847) 362-9200. 

VW GOLF 1986, new tires, 
new brakes, vary litle rust, 
$600. (847) 587-0394. 

VW JETTA GLS 1996, 
$13,195.(8471623-3000 



824 


Vara 



CHEVY 1003 G20 CON- 
VERSION, loaded, no rust, 
mint, green. New cassette, 
battery, alarm, remote start, 

$7.000/best. (847) 612-9523. 

CHEVY 1094 CONVER- 
SION VAN, $9,495. (S47) 625- 
8400. , 

CHEVY 1098 ASTRO CON- 
VERSION VAN, very low 
miles, extended warranty, 
power everything, fully loaded. 
Must sell, $13,750. (262) 
686-6566. '■ 

CLUB WAGON 1988, - 5.011- 
ter, well kept, reliable, $2,800. 
(847)838-1207. 

DODGE 1991 CARAVAN 

SE. $5,495. (847) 625-8400. 

DODGE 1996 GRAND 
CAFtAVAN, $10,995. (B47) 
662-2400. 

DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 
ES 1992, $5,995. (847)823- 
3000 ' 

FORD 1985 VAN, runs 
good, extra set of tires, power 
windows and door locks. Good 
work van. $650/best. (847) 
973-2108. 

FORD 1988 F-250 VAN, 
12ft. bed, hitch, ladder racks, 
$1,150/besL (262) 843-4646. 

FOHD 1995 WINDSTAR 
$8,995. 847-526-2424 

FORD 1995 WINDSTAR 
VAN, $1i;995. (847) 625- 
8400. 

VENTURE 1997 EXT. 
$14,900,847-526-2424 



814 


SeniceS Parts 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



1971 DUSTER PARTS 

GLASS, hoods, wiring, extras. 
(847) 546-7695 aftor 6pm. 

CHEAP-CHEAP-CHEAP 

Crazy Ron's Tires. 

Discount Tires 

Waukegan. 

(B47) 244-2555. 

TIRES & RIMS 

4 Mlcholin tires Pilot LTX- 

P285/S0/R18 and 4 Borbet 

wheels, brand new, paid 

$1,700, will sell for $1,000. 

815-378-7111 

WHEELS 4-ALUMINUM 

MAG wheels with tires for 
1987 Dodge Dakota, 
$250/besl. (262) 654-7857. 



828 



FourVtfceb . 
Drrce^cepx . 



844 



Motorcycles 



S42 


Landscaping 



JEEP 1994 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE, $10,995. (847) 882- 
2400. '•- 

JEEP; 1098' CHEROKEE 
SPORT, $14,700. (847) 623- 
1492. . 

JEEP 1996 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LIMITED, $17^400. 
(847)623-1492. 

JEEP 1987 4X4 COM- 
ANCHE, sunroof, CD player, 
list of new parts. Runs perfect, 
needs body work, 

• $1,200/best. (262) 308-0340. 

JEEP 1997 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE, $15,995. (847) 662- 
2400. -. 

NISSAN 1993 PATH- 
FINDER, $11,995. (847) 662- 

2400. 

NISSAN PATHFINDER V-6 
4X4 1991, $9,995 (847)623- 

3000 ■ 

QX4 4X4 1998, $26,995. 
(847)362-9200. . 

WRANGLER 1098 SA- 
HARA, $19,900. (847) 623- 
1492. 

WRANGLER 1998 SPORT 
4X4, $17,500. (847) 623-1492. 



1978 FORD F250 4x4, 7*6' 
Western plow, runs good, 
body rough, $1 ,500. 

Call 262-763-7476 

BLAZER 1 997 4-DR. 4X4 
526-2424 

BRONCO 1995 XLT 4X4, 
5.8 Liter, automatic, all power, 
tow package, new tires, has 
had great maintenance, 65K 
miles, clean inside and out, 
$13,900.(847)855-1236 

CHEVY 1990 SUBURBAN 
4X4, brand new motor, 4in. lift. 
& 35ln. tires, clean, 
$8,000/best. (847) 922-0006, 
pager (888) 226-2717. 

CHEVY 1992 BLAZER 4X4. 
4-door, loaded,. 114K, new 
tires/brakes. Looks/runs great. 
$6,500/besL (847) 543-8018. 

CHEVY 1993 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, $8,995. (847) 662-2400. 

CHEVY 1096 SUBURBAN LT 
$24,900. 847-526-2424' 

DODGE DURANGO 1999 
$25,995. (847)823-3000. 

FORD 1987 EDDIE 

BAUER BRONCO II, 

148,000 miles. Asking 
$2,500/firm. Call (847) 740- 
0769. 

FORD 1991 BRONCO, 
$7,200. (847) 623-1492. 

FORD 1994 BRONCO XLT. 
5.8 V8, power everything, al- 
loys, extra clean, 1 -owner, 
$10,600*. Call Jeff (847) 
507-5852. 

FORD 1994 F-160 4X4, 
XLT, Club Cab, shortbed, off 
road package, power wind- 
ows, A/C, 351 V8, automatic 
transmission, excellent condi- 
tion, $11,750. (847) 
263-8316. 

GMC JIMMY 4X4 1992, 
$7.995. (647) 625-8400. 

GMC SIERRA 4X4 1998, 
$15,995. (847)623-3000. 

GMC Z71 1996 extended 
cab, fully loaded, CD, cas- 
sette, push button 4WD, per- 
fect condition, $17,900/best. 
(847) 395-6680,. (847) 707- 
4568. 

GO IN THE SNOW. 1985 
Bronco II, 4WD, 5-speed, 
good condition, high miles, 
$2.000/best. (847) 546-6697. 

JEEP 1986 CHEROKEE 5- 
speed, 15,000 miles on new 
2.8 motor, new brakes, discs, 
bearings, muffler, works good, 
$3,800/best. Ramon Acuna 
8am-7pm. (847) 249-0136. 

JEEP 1994 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, $9,900. (847) 
823-1492. 

JEEP 1994 GRAND CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, $11,900. 
(847) 623-1492. 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 1970 
FLH ELECTRAGLIDE S&S. 
Cart>, shovel, extras, 'clean, 
57,500/OBO. Call 'evenings 
(414)694-7715, .' 

HONDA MOTORCYCLE 

1996 Gold wing As pen cade, 
■17,000 miles, candy apple 
red, mint * condition, 
$10,800/firm, (262) 534-4565. 

VULCAN 1994 

750 Kawasaki, 

10,000 original miles, 

$4,000 or best offer. 

Ask for Dan Senior 

815-3B5-6397 

YAMAHA 1097 BANSHEE, 
race ready, -• never raced, 
$9,0004- Invested, too much to 
list, $5,995. (815) 648-2508. 



YAMAHA TRI-Z, 3- 

WHEELER, very fast, 

$1,600. Must see. (262) 
859-2600. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



S. HERNANDEZ 

LANDSCAPING 

• No Job Too Small. 

•Quality Workmanship; 

•Inside/Outside Painting 

*Snowptowing 

♦Free Estimates 

•Fully Insured. 

Sifverio Hernandez 

Round Lake Park, III. 

(8471 546-4617 or 721-4617. 



Visit us 




S48 


Legal Services 



the web 






DIVORCE $195 30-60 
DAYS., children, properly, 
missing spouse OK. Bankrupt- 
cy $225 stop creditors calls. 
8am-8pm. Monday-Saturday. 
1-800-688-3188 (SCA Net- 
work). 



S78 


Remodeling 



ASTRO 1903 EXT. $8995 
847-526-2424 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 

(847) 662-5202. 

CHEVY 1996 EXT. CAB, . 
black, V6 manual, warranty, 
$15,500/best. (262) 
878-5072. 

CHEVY 1996 SUBURBAN 
4X4, all leather, full power, 
dual A/C & heat, Impeccably 
maintained, $24,900/best. 
(847) 265-755B. 

DODGE 1995 RAM VtO, au- 
tomatic trans., loaded, ext. 
cab, 8fL box, $15,000. (262) 
752-0597. ; ."- 

DODGE DAKOTA 1991, 
$4,495. (647)623-3000. 

DODGE RAM CLUB CAB 
4X4, 1997 $20,995. (847J623- 
3000 

DODGE RAM CONV VAN 

1996, $12,998. (847)623-3000 

FORD 1985 F-160 4WD, 
everything works, runs good, 
$1,400/besL (262) 862-9231 
after 5pm. 

FORD 1087 TRUCK F-350, 
cab and chassis, 6.9 diesel, 
new fenders and doors, 
$4,000/best. (414) 877-9644. 

FORD 1988 RANGER GT. 
160K miles, new transmission, 
rims, tires, looks good, no 
rust, Georgia truck, runs but 
needs engine work, 
$2.200/beSt (847) 578-9439. 

FORD RANGER 1904 XLT 
4WD manual, Immaculate, 
70K, 5K/2yr. left full warranty, 
step bars/push bar with 
fogs/cap bedliner, GV TR R15 
tires 15K. New Sony CD am/fm 
speakers CB radio/antenna, 
$8,995/best. Craig 8am- 
10pm. (262)770-9155. 

FORD RANGER XLT EXT 
CAB 1994 $7,995. (847)623- 
3000. 

LANDSCAPER RETIRING 
TONS of equipment for sale. 
1991 Ford F-350, 1-ton dump 
truck, mint condition, low 
miles. Call for details (262) 
857-9206. 

MY TRUCK IS A 1987 
CHEVY S-10, 4-wheel drive, 
130,000, blue, $2,200. (847) 
8380759. 

SNOWPLOW 7FT.6IN., 

WESTERN, Early Chevy, 
$475. (262) 859-2600. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



SALT SPREADER 1998 
Western 2.5 cy. V box salt 
spreader, used 2 times, elec- 
tric start kit/hopper screen, 
like new, $2,800. (847) 

234-047A. 



844 


Motorcycles 



S33 



Handyman 



1 



THE HANDYMAN NO Job 
too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and Jree estimates. 
(8471 223-7724. 



S39 


Housekeeping 



1904 HD FATBOY, red, 
28,000 miles, excellent condi- 
tion, lots of chrome, Sampson 
Drag Pipes, Skulls galore, 
many extras, $15,500. (847) 
963-9408 Carl. 



DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICE! 

10 Years Experience 

•Move outs, 

•Senior Specials. 

Reasonable Rates. 

References available. 

(847) 973-9913. 



DC TILE WE We instsall ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, and 
Pergo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 

pager (JOB) 9S8-8504. 

JACK'S 

REMODELING 

*Basemsnt Finishing 

•Familyrooms & Officerooms 

•Electrical & Plumbing 

•Kitchens & Baths 

•Vinyl Replacement Windows 

•Soffit Fascia. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(B47) 546-3759. 

QUALITY ONE HOME Im- 
provement We do Interior and 
exterior painting, drywall, 
decks, and more. Call now for 
Holiday Savings. Free Esti- 
mates. Call between 7-5 Mon- 
day-Friday, Saturday 8am- 
4pm. Ask for Dan (847) 
740-3309. 
•CH 




IPNEWS 



.COM 



A 



TAX DIRECTORY 



U 



CUT 



LTD. 



Enrolled Agents 

Certified Public Accountants 

IRS Representation 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

CARL SAND 
ACCOUNTING & INCOME TAX 

E-File available 

Income Tax Preparation 

Small Business Accounting 

404 Lake St •Antioch 

(847) 395-7444 

COMPREHENSIVE 
ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Free E-File wlpd. return 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

Mary Carpenter, CPA 

(847) 223-4040 

COTE & WRIGHT 

Servicing Lake County for over 30 years 
31 S. Seymour, Ste. B • Grayslake 

(847) 231-4163 • fax (847) 231-4167 
1304 Washington St. • Waukegan 

(847) 662-6019 • fax (847) 662-6053 
E-mail: cotewright@aol.com 

* dam/snell & tavei^e/ltd. 

Certified Public Accountants 

21 Rollins Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-3022 

1512 Artaius Parkway • Libertyville 

(847) 367-4448 

4410 Rt. 1 76, Ste. 6 • Crystal Lake 

(815) 356-9182 

Internet Address: dstcpa.com 



H&R BLOCK 

474B W. Liberty • Wauconda 

(847)526-8877 

2 W.Grand • Fox Lake 

(847)587-9333 

426 Lake • Antioch 

1 (847)395-6230 

629 W. Rollins • Round Lake 

(847)546-4862 



JACKSON HEWITT* 




Taxsewira 

344 North Ave. (ComerNonh&Mmn) • Antioch 

(847)973-1099 

366 Virginia St. mu) • Crystal Lake 

(815)477-2905 

226 N. Barron Blvd. • Grayslake 

(847)548-6060 

1007 N. Front St. (rud • McHenry 

(815)363-1040 

622HawleySt. • Mundelein 

(847)949-8433 

2435 Green Bay Road • North Chicago 

(847)689-1099 

23 W. Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach 

(847)740-1099 

336 S. Green Bay Road 9 Waukegan 

(847)360-1099 

2250 Sheridan Road • Zion 

(847)746-1099 

CALL 1-800-234-1040 

FOR OTHER LOCATIONS 

IERROLD J. WEINSTEIN, LTD. 

Income Tax Preparation 
(Electronic Filing Available) 
Small Business Accounting 

Payroll Service 

4949 Grand Ave. • Gurnee 

(847) 662-3420 



■" 



V* 



■^ ' *TT 



i.S 



~? 



C26 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



January 28, 2000 



E39 



Lakeland Newspapers is your 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Businesses & 




CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC^ 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

33265 N. Rte. 45 
Wildwood, [L 60030 

(847) 223-4682 




Lakeland Building 
Maintenance Inc. 



"Wo do the cleaning so you can 
concentrate on the business" 

• Offices • Medical Buildings 
Factories • Animal Hospitals 
Banks • Construction Clean-up 

24-Hour Emorgency Service 



(847)791-4204 
(847)566-2589 




To Place 
Your Ad Here 
Call 

847-223-8161 



Insured 



Bonded 



ALL AROUND 
CLEANING 

We do all cleaning! 
Small patching 6- painting. 

FREE ESTIMATES | 

Call Kathy Warner at 

847-587-1342 




847/395-3454 

• Payroll,, spread sheets, 
' general ledger, income 
i taxes & computer input. 
) Call Karen Palka . , 
for an appointment today! ; 



' ";""»»»"' mrn Hu i mm mgiTiCTnin 



TfiindiSpruig! 

Cattits at 

Lakeland 9^ezvspapers 

to advertise your 

business here. 

(847)223-8161 

»iiiiinnmi.in 1 ..;;;.M.„ f .. r ..,.,.... l j i 



INTERNET CI^VSSIFIEDS 

DONT BE LEFT BEHIND 

100 word /9()d;iys/$ 175 
Banner Ad./ 90 Days / $250 

Discounts to Start Y2K 
1999 30% 2000 Jan 15% Feb 10% 



EHSTiivcrm7E 

TECHlVOLCKSyr 

84-7-V409061 

: dls"i 'iNcnvirri-c®AOi„coM 



Honest John's 
Firewood 



• F.C. $65 Delivered 

• Free estimates on Tree Work 
(847) 548-4993 



**+*. + **♦. <!*.****«.** + *♦.*•******#■#.* 





15 



RECYCLE 

CASH For Alum. Cans 
Cop»ur-Brass 
Insulated Wire 



Chicago Surplus 

1 1304-260th Ave 
Trevor, Wise. 



One Mile West of 83 &C 
Turn North on 259th 



n 



Mon-Fri 9-5 pm 

Sat 9-3 

Closed 12-1 Lunch 



* 

* 
* 

* 



* 



Painting,;Wailj>apering 

Expert Installation 
Paper ♦-Fabric •Vinyl 

DECORATING 

INSURED 

(847^95-8428 



* 
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* 
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* 
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*> 
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«.*****., A*********** *,*, + + *,♦**,**.** 




262-862-251 




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Alt AMERICAN 
% CONST. ^ 

Kitchen-Bath-Bascment^ 
Painting/Custom Remodeling 
Qual[ty work atafforjable- prices 

($500offwiththisad) 

Free Estimates' 

847-548-5110- 

Lit. Bonded ' «« v..i3 



& Insured "■"'"" 



«HmR* 



M 
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Personal Touch 

Residential Clean i nn Service 



A Dciail Cleaning Even- Tunc 

'Til Put A Sparkle In Your Home, 

& A Smile On Your Face" 

All Supplier Inclmlixl 

dullest >|vja.iJ vSillii«< It^ioffi 



>e>\ Home Based Business 

Best Rays Now Available! 

Cmilil Yo.tir.lliime I se 

Sume Special Attention! 



Ask for Desiree 546-0767 



DON'T THROW AWA 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 

WILDWOOD.IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 






^ 



• ROOF, SIDING AND WINDOW LEAK 
TROUBLESHOOTING AND REPAIR 

[• ROOF INSPECTIONS (NEW & RE-ROOF) 

• CUSTOM RE-ROOF SPECIFICATIONS 



PHONE # 847-508-7148 

FAX # 847-587-6258 

E-MAIL: ResRoofCo@aol.com 



MEMBER: 

. hoof c'cwtutUHit n ttiruie ihcii 

. N«llON«L ROOf HO COH1RACJ0RI ASIOC 
|t«(U| • 

• BUIIWHO Of ncuLi icoot »oumil TUMOR t 
|BOC»| 

ILLINOIS I TATE UCENUD ROOf WQ 
C3HTTUCTCM 



*/\>o L^ime to ^mXeanl 

You're always busy and cleaning is a chore.... 
Let us tidy up for you! 

We offer deaninG: 

•Weekly • lii-Monihly •Monthly 

•Special Occasions & Kdncaiions 

- Very Reasonable Kates - licensed; Insured, & Bonded 

- Fltlili Estimates - References Available 



Staci-Bnibakcr 
Owner 



PRO-MAIDS 

Professional Cleaning Service 

(847) 514-6855 





ire you intertill 
placing an «d here? 

(all (847) 223-81(1 
ax (847) 223-2691 








H o r i z o n Remodeling Inc. 



Full Service Remodeling 

Drywall 

Basement Finishing 

Garage Finishing 

Residential and Commercial 



insure d ! 



f 8 4 ? ) 8 3 8 -5 9 4 9 







A PRIVATE PARTY IVIERCHANDBSE AD 



Name 



Address 



Phone. 
City_ 



State 



Zip. 



LISTINGS 



19.75 =15 words or fewer, onu week, 15© each additional 

word. Ads will be seen in all 11 Lakeland Newspapers, The 

Market Journal, Great Lakes Bulletin and on the Internet. 



Please check one box below! 



a GARAGE SALES 330 

Q LAWN & GARDEN 348 

Q HOUSEHOLD MERCHANDISE 340 

□ APPLIANCES 304 

□ MISC. MERCHANDISE . .350 

□ PETS 360 

□ WANTED TO BUY - 370 

□ GIVEAWAY 120 

We'll help you gel rid ol your 
unwanted treasures. Your ad will 
reach 200,000-1-. II works I Call 
(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 and ask 
for Lisa. The classified deadline is 
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. 



□ BOATS & EQUIPMENT '.'.710 

□ MOTORCYCLES 844 

Q CAMPERS & TRAVEL TRAILERS . . .704 

□ AUTOMOBILE LOAN & FINANCING .804 

□ VANS & TRUCKS 834 

□ AUTOMOBILES WANTED 848 

a AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE 804 





DEADLINE: Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 

Please allow extra time for orders 

being sent through mail*. 

Payment must be received with order. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


a 


9 


io 


1 1 


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/ 



Drop ad off in our office from 8:00 arra~5:Q0 pm Monday-Friday 
at 30 S. Whitney; Grayslake, IL or fax to our 24 HOUR fax line at 847-223 2691 



* We are not responsible for ads received late that were sent through regular mail. 



\jdnuary28 l 2000 



COUNTY 



lakeland Newspapers 



/ C27 




I 



j 



i 



Lakeland Newspapers presents its Annua! Report on the status 
one of the fastest growing areas in the nation: Lake County! 
exciting progress edition has received high praise from readers 
straight-forward reporting of the past, present and future plans for all the dynamic 
communities represented in Lake County. ■£ . ^ . 

Lakeland Publishers' editorial department annually -selects ten individuals trom the 
Lake County area that reflect the kind of excellence that drives our communities 
forward, and presents their stories in Forefronts 2000. 



featured; 

TOPICS: . 



•Business; ■• Most ^ Influential People 
Economical Development . 
Recreation/ Lifestyles •Politics 
Transportation : # Environ menta!^;_^ 
" ^ucatib n ^ ^ma Ithrare^^^Soci a I Issues 




oris 
on Will 




C28 /Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



January 28, 2000 



.il 



\~ 



*. 





By A 





Don't Have 
Optical insurance?/, 

ipi 697-5500, 

; . Ask for Ursula, i 





<%^ 





m || 

Purchase Of A Complete Pair Of Glasses ■ r 



we will Match 

iftny Other Contact 

Or Eyeglass Offer!;; 




ABM 




You must have current offer in hand at time of purchase.. ,"■ V | 
Some restrictions mav apply. Product must be 100% Identical, borne restrictions may apply. -Not. valid ■ 

Expires on February 14, 2000. LL.H I, ? with any other of fer- Expires on February I4i 2000. , U.I 

uc es iBBB oa ■■ ■■ mmat mm mm mm Omm mm Mi na mbi mm mm na mm bbJI 














fc^ fcr2. 





Buy Any Pair Of Glasses At Regular Price, g 

Get A Second Pair FREE! 



PAIR • FUN PAIR 

Second pair must be same prescription. Selected Stock Frames. 

Some restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer. Expires on February 14, 2000, 




I ON MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS & I 
| FRIDAYS AT THE PLEASANT | 
■ PRAIRIE OR LAKEHURST i 

J STORES IN JANUARY & FEBRUARY J 

; Appointment must be made in advance to Include eye exam and . 

I complete purchase of a pair of regularly priced Glasses. I i 

Some restriction-; may apply, • j 

Not valid with any other offer. 
Expires on February 14, 2000. 





NOBODY CARES FOR 

BETTER THAN PEARB.E 




LAKEHURST MALL 

LOCATION 

(847) 4734422 

WAUKEGAN 

Lower Level by Carsons- 



1805 N. RICHMOND ROAD 

McHENRY 

(815) 363-1700 



6641 W. GRAND AVE. 

SUITED 

GURNEE (847) 856-1200 

-In Front of Dominick's- 



MEW LOCATi 




Located just West of Hwy. C., on Hwy. 50 (75th Street) in the Prairie Ridge Shopping Centre 

9000 76th ST., SUITE A., PLEASANT PRAIRIE 

Call Now For Your Appointment: f# % 4) 697-l§§©@ 

Dr. Available 7 Days A Week 
One-Hour Service For Most Classes 



**i 




VISA 



oUG^ 



^dM^J*»,J^"...^,'Jii.g 



January 28', 2000 . 



Lakeland Newspapers/ E 1 



L 




' tW U fvv 







flHMBi I 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 



January 28, 2000 



Rose trivia and fun facts 

TOmw ux/ ^ ■':■■■ ;^ Where do roses come from? 

. Sjxty^-p^cent of the world's roses are grown in Central and South America, 
SQpPv -V including Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. The remaining 40 percent 
are grown in Europe, including Holland, Portugal, Spain, Italy and Isreal. In 
the United States, California is the largest rose-growing state. 




hether one's taste leans to the subtle, the flamboyant or the delicate, 
there is a rose to please. Currently, there are over 200 rose species and 
several thousand varieties worldwide. Red roses are still the most 
popular color of rose, but there is a tremendous variation in the 
palette of red. 

Fun facts 

•The rose is a symbol of the times. In fact, it's the official National Floral 
Emblem of the United States. 

•While the rose may bear no fruit, the rose hips (the part left on the 
plant after a rose is done blooming) contain more Vitamin C than almost any 
other fruit or vegetable. 

•According to Greek mythology, Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love, gave the 
rose its name. 

•Why white roses are so special is no mystery — it's a myth. Perhaps it 
started with the Romans who believed white roses grew where the tears 
of Venus fell as she mourned the loss of her beloved Adonis. Myth also has it 
that Venus' son Cupid accidentally shot arrows into the rose garden when a bee ' 
stung him, and it was the "sting" of the arrows that caused the roses to grow thorns. 
When Venus walked through the garden and pricked her foot on the thorn, it was 
the droplets of her blood that-turned the roses red. 

•Wherefore art thou rose? In the readings of Shakespeare, of course. He refers to 
roses more than 50 times throughout his writings. 

•Leave it to the romantic French to be the first to deliver roses. It was in the 17th 
century that French explorer Samuel deChamplain brought the first cultivated ros- 
es to North America. 



•Roses are truly ageless. Archaeologists recently discovered the fossilized re- 
mains of wild roses over 40 million years old. 

•The world's oldest living rose is though to be 1,000 years old. It continues to 
flourish today on the wall of the Hildeshiem Cathedral In Germany. 

General care and 
handling tips for roses 

What to look for when shopping at the florist; This is where it 

starts. Look or ask for flowers showing full color and strong, straight 
stems. Be sure that the petals are just starting to open. Contrary to 
popular belief, roses that are tight and hard will not necessarily last 
long. In fact, they may never even open. 

Care and handling tips: To achieve maximum enjoyment from your 
roses, simply follow these easy steps: 

Roses delivered In a box need to be opened immediately and placed in water. 
If this cannot be done,.put the entire box in a cool, dark place such as a refrigerator 
or garage. 

•To arrange the roses, fill a deep vase with luke-warm water, and mix in the flo- 
ral preservative provided by the florist. 

•Remove any leaves that may fall below the waterline when placed in the vase, 
as they will promote bacterial growth. 

•To extend the life of roses, use a sharp knife or shears to cut an inch from the 
bottom of the stem while holding it underwater. Cutting stems underwater pre- 
vents air from blocking the flow of water to the head of the bud. 

•To keep roses looking fresh, add warm water to the vase every day. Always 
keep the vase full. Completely change the water every three-to-four days and re-cut 
the stems. 




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New At Jack's 

Vacuum Center 



Call today to order or for more information. 

847-336-7211 

OR 

1-800-615-2466 (Highland Park) 



Be sure to visit us at the show! 
Booth #3 1 5 




AT&T 



AT&T Cable Services 




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<gnpParfiie£> 




Long cord with Automatic Rewind feature 

Variable Speed Control Cleaning 

Full bag indicator 

Electronic speed indicator 

Telescopic wand 

Triple Filtration System 

Powerful, quiet motor 

Carrying handle 

Multi-surface cleaning capabilities 

Specialized tools for all vacuuming needs 



8 lbs, Provides effortless vacuuming, lifting and storage 
Dual Suction System™ — twin fans and dual suction path 
for more powerful and effective cleaning 
Featuring a Filtrete™ HEPA Filtration System 
Ergonomic handle designed for comfort and less stress , 

I Superior warranty — 5 years on the motor and 10 years on 

.the motor and 10 years on Ihe motor housing 
Wide cleaning path and dual edge cleaning makes 
vacuuming go quickly ■ 

1 30 ft. long reach cord 

I Non-marring wheels — safe for use on bare floors 

I Easy bag change 

I Furniture guard bumper 

I Powerful headlight 



i 

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January 28, 2000 



HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 



Lakeland Newspapers / 



How to give a tired bath a 



Not since ancient Rome's fun-loving citizenry frolicked in heated 
pools has the bath been more appreciated. After all, there's great 
luxury in locking out a day of office stress and frenzied freeways 
and giving oneself over to the sudsy comfort of this private space. 








, ut what if your bath isn't exactly spa quality? In fact, it needs help just 
to be acceptable, you say? 

Not to worry. Even a sadly outdated or outright ugly bath can be 
given a beauty treatment, and according to the design experts, it can even be 
done on a modest budget. 

Look at the following ideas: 

•If your is a really old-time bath, accentuate its age rather than hide ^..Espe- 
cially ifit's Victorian in style. For example, a footed tub is now the height of fash- 
ion, so you might give it new stature by raising it'onto a tile-clad platform. Think , 
of using small two-inch square tiles on the platform. They lend themselves beau- 
tifully to patterns and borders. There are colors ranging from quiet neutrals and 
pretty pastels to bright primaries and dramatic darks for infinite design possibili- 
ties. Epoxy-paint the outside of the tub to coordinate with the tiles on the plat- 
form and add brass fittings-. Now you're ready for a regal soak. 

•Or incorporate a tiled platform that comes up to the edge of the tub and add 
wide ledges or steps. Now you have created the illusion of a sunken tub. 

•Don't despair over an old tile floor or walls in hideous colors. If they're struc- 
turally sound, you can put new tile right over them. Special setting materials are 
available, make this dream a beautiful reality. 

•In many older baths, tile stops three quarters up the wall. If this looks 
awkward to you, install wallboard on the upper part of the wall to make up 
for the thickness of the tile below. Then tile the whole wall, from floor to 
ceiling. 

•Re- tile with a designer's touch. That means taking advantage of all of today's 



great designer looks. To give a bath a country 
look, for example, floors of tried and true quar- 
ry tile in warm red orbrown. Cherry red, black 
and Artie white, all colors found in Sum- 
mityille's Morganmates group of porcelain 
paver tiles, are sure to add lots of drama, and 
in the bath that's OK. After all, you don't spend 
all that much time there, so a dose of bright 
color won't tire the eyes. And you can't miss 
with the classic stone looks. They can be used 
in baths of any style. Among the best looks: 
porcelain pavers and ceramic tiles that mimic 
granite, slabs of weathered stone carved put of 
.ancient mountains, travertine, slate and cob- 
blestones. These tiles look just like the real 
thing, but they are much more affordable, and 
easier to install. 

•A tiled vanity top is a terrific improve- 
ment. It looks great, is easy to care for, and that hot curling wand won't scorch it 

•Grouts, the filler material that goes between the tile, now'come in a rainbow 
of colors, so they must be considered, too. For a quiet, monochromatic scheme, 
choose a grout that matches the tile, but if you like the grid effect of tile, use a 
contrasting grout for emphasis. White wall tile with bright green or coral green 
grout are striking examples. 




Ceramic classicism '— . Ce- 
ramic tile in three different 
colors and sizes adds old- 
world classicism to a country 
bath. 



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E4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 



January '28, 2000 



Spring is the time to spruce up the 




A 

/ * s spring brings blooming flowers and milder weather, people everywhere 
/ % will go through the annual spring-cleaning ritual of organizing house and 
home. But who wants to spend a beautiful day in the house doing chores 
when afternoons could be spent in the sun? 

Creating a fresh, clean look for spring does not have to be expensive or time-con- 
suming. Spring home makeovers can be fun and easy with a few key cleaning and deco- 
rating tips, 

• A simple plan — If you do not plan anything, jt is likely nothing will happen. 
Schedule time to complete projects around the house. When the time comes to get 
down to business, start with organizational tasks that will make the rest of the job easier. 
For example, make a place for everything and keep it in its place. Update your filing sys- 
tem to take the stress out of sorting mail and payingbills. Another way to make things 
easier around the house is to hang a central calendar. Encourage everyone to enter their 
plans as early as possible, in order to eliminate scheduling headaches. 

• May makeover — Take a good look at your home and decide which rooms could 
use a quick makeover. Futon furnishings make seasonal makeovers a breeze — just 
change the cover from a dark winter plaid to a pastel spring floral,- and you are set for the 
new season. Futon covers and pillows come in a wide variety of fabrics, colors and pat- 
terns to highlight any style. Whether you want the rustic look of a summer cabin or the 
trendy feel of a modern living room, futon furnishings will bring out the best in your 
home. Maximize space by using versatile futon furnishings to turn a den or three-season 
porch into a guest bedroom or home office. Coordinate the room's style by adding fu- 
ton-furniture accessories like matching end tables or chairs. Put the finishing touches on 
the spring makeover by changing accessories like pictures, plants and lamps. Magnify 
light and space with a few well-placed mirrors to give rooms a bright and spacious at- 
mosphere. 

• Good clean fun — Now that the house is organized and updated, spring-cleaning 
is no problem. Simplify your work by putting things away after use, breaking larger tasks 



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Living large — whether you have an elegant living room or a .casual family room, 
versatile futon furnishings bring comfort and style to any room. 

into smaller sessions and combining jobs whenever possible. Organize your time and 
cleaning supplies the way a professional would. Rummaging around the house looking 
for sponges or a mop bucket is a waste of time. Finally, take steps to keep the "spring- 
clean", look all season. Deep-clean the carpets, use runners and throw rugs in high-traffic 
areas, and thoroughly clean windows, draperies and upholstery. Don't forget— spring is 
in the air, so sit back and enjoy your spruced-up home. 

For more information on futon furnishings or to locate a futon retailer near you, visit 
www.futon.org on the Internet or call (800) 327-3262. 



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^W pring home-improvement projects can be exciting, especially 

^^ when they involve changing the d£cor of the home. Whether you 
i I P' an to make a minor change, like hanging new drapes, or you 
^^r have something extensive in mind, it is important to consider your 
health and safety in the process. 
Following are decorating health and safety tips, courtesy of "Decorating 
Hints & Tips" (DK), by Julian Cassell and Peter Parham. 

Following Instructions 

• Always read manufacturers' operating instructions before using any 
equipment. 

• Make sure that you use any materials or chemicals safely, complying 
with statutory legislation regulating the use of hazardous substances. Follow 
advice on labels carefully before making solutions or mixtures. 

Using equipment 

• Make sure that ladders and stepladders are in good working order, and 
platforms have been constructed safely, to prevent injury from falling. 

Electricity 

• Disconnect any electrical equipment when it is not in use, even for a 
short time. 

• Switch off the power supply when decorating around switches or wall 
outlets and when cleaning them. 

• Consider using a ground-fault interrupter to protect against electrocu- 
tion. 

Protecting People 

• Increase the ventilation in a room to reduce the effects of dust and 
fumes. 

• Wear a mask to minimize the amount of dust and fine particles that you 
inhale. 



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SG /Lakeland Newspapers HOME & GARDEN . January 28, 2000 

Homeowners searching for space 
turn to a backyard Favorite 

A—- 

/ » owners are in need of more 
£ \ space for storage, work or 
everyday activities. Each '. 
year, lawn mowers, gardening tools, bicy- 
cles, rollerblades and toys clutter base- 
ments, garages and attics. We all are 

searching for room to spjead out. Homeowners rediscover a back- 

Homeowners looking for space and yard favorite in the multipurpose 
convenience are rediscovering a backyard V 91 " barn. 
favorite — the yard barn. With many at- 
tractive designs, numerous accessories and features, the yard barn is popping 
up in backyards across the country. It provides a simple solution to space 
problems while adding value to a home. 

The yard barn has evolved to be much more than a storage shelter. Consid- 
er these ideas: 

• Workshops— Keep tools, saws and workbenches in one area for maxi- 
mum efficiency. 

• Gardening sheds — Pot plants and organize garden tools in the perfect 
garden work center. 

• Children's playhouse— Build a fun place for children to play and use 
their imaginations. 

• Pool houses — Store swimming pool supplies or customize to make a 
swimsuit changing room. 

• Studios — Escape to a quiet, secluded spot and become inspired. 

• Tack rooms — Keep bridles and feed dry in a sheltered area.- 
Today, yard bams come with many options and accessories. Some manu- 
facturers will build the barn on site. 



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HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 











Lakeland Newspapers / E7 



See These Exhibitors At The Home & Garden 

February 5 & 6, 2000 





LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS - BUILDING I 





432 



430 



428 



426 



424 



422 



LOADING 
AREA 



416 



414 



412 



410 



408 



406 



404 



433 


431 


429 


427 


423 


421 


334 


332 


330 


328 


324 


322 



417 


415 


411 


409 


407 


405 


403 


318 


316 


412 


310 


308 


306 


304 



STRICTLY 
SPAS 




333 


331 


329 


327 


323 


321 


234 


232 


230 


228 


224 


222 



317 


315 


311 


309 


307 


305 


303 


218 


216 


212 


210 


208 


206 


204 



GAEBOCRAFT 
INC. 



233 


231 


229 


227 


223 


221 


134 


132 


130 


128 


124 


122 



217 



118 



215 



116 



213 



114 



211 



112 



209 



110 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



REST 
ROOMS 



•4*«1% « «»*• 




Ameritech Employment 
Opportunities 

Douglas TV 

AT&T Cable Service 

Water Tech 

Daily Herald 

News Sun 

DK Family Learning 

Clownin' Around 

lnternest.com 

Breezy Hill Nursery 

Pioneer Press 

Paul Swartz Nursery 

Arbor View 

Results Lawn Care 

Home Interiors & Gifts 

Sparkling Spring Water Co. 

Hacker's Exterior Inc. 

H&R Custom Designs 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Backyard Enclosures Inc. 

Aqua Pool & Spa Pros 

North Protection Services Inc. 

Merry Maids Mundelein 

Santi Construction 

Tru-Green ChemLawn 

The South Bend Chocolate Co. 

The Contractor Pages.com 

Dish Jockeys 

ReMax Showcase/ 
Christopher Hoelz 



Budget Landscaping Co. 

Electrolux Corporation 

Don Cabinetry Co. 

Carpet Castle 

Mega Home Improvement Co. 

Home Comfort Heating & 
Cooling Co. 

Nations Credit 

Beanie Central Chicago 

Alpine Industries 

Global Waterproofing Co. 

Business & Home Computing 

Solutions 

Miller's Area Heating & 
Cooling Co. 

Americlean Inc. 

A Clean Sweep Inc. 

Fisher Mortgage Co. 

All Temp Heating & 
Cooling Co. 

Sears Homelife Furniture 

Laursen & Blackman Co. 

Orange Brite Inc. 

Strictly Spas Inc. 

Studio Designs 

Lifestyle Windows & Doors 

Superior Exteriors Inc. 

All American H20 Inc. 

Uncommon USA Inc. 

Watertight Plumbing Co. 

Commonwealth 
United Mortgage 



Resort Travel Corporation 

Fairfield Material & Supply 

Liberty Safes of Chicago 

Accent Land Design 

Decade Floor Covering Inc. 

Lone Oak Electric 

Patio Enclosures, Inc. 

Leafguard 

Cera Bella 

Four Seasons Heating & 
Cooling 

Hinckley Springs 

Brinks Home Security Inc. 

Handyman Online Inc. 

All American Roofing 

Midwest Builders 

Top Deck Builders 

A&H Construction 

Top-Tec Heating & Cooling 

2 Men And A Truck 

Gazebocraft Inc. 

Home Improvement 

Network 
Chris-Kare Sunrooms 
Creative Deck Builders 
Line-X 

Anderson Floors & Walls 
Arlington Heights Kirby 
Century Tile 

& Supply Co. 












E8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 



January 28, 2000 



Jam 






Eight reasons why trees die 



Accidents. Automobiles, storms and even lavmmowers can cause bark 
damage and wounds on trees. One can avoid tree wounding by planting 
them in sheltered locations or by providing some sort of barrier. Be very 
careful while using iawn mowers and weed trimmers, as careless use can 
damage the roots and bark of even large trees. Check for any damage incurred dur- 
ing heavy storms, and treat it promptly. Remember, the integrity and stability of a 
tree changes over time. 

Too much herbicide. When used properly, chemicals can benefit trees and 
their growth. Improperly used, herbicides can interact with the roots and damage 
the tree's health. Make sure the instructions for application are carefully followed. 
Seek professional help whenever you are not sure. 



Location, location, location. Trees need proper sunlight and should be ap- 
propriate for the climactic conditions, or plant hardiness zone, of the area. Visual- 
ize the actual height the tree could reach and make sure there are no power lines in 
its path and the tree is a good distance from the house, other structures and other 
plants. 

Painting tree wounds and filling cavities with concrete. Paint on tree 
wounds will actually trap moisture In the wood, increasing the chances of decay. If 
you want to paint a wound for cosmetic reasons, use a very thin coating of wound 
dressing. Trunk cavities filled with cement make the tree unusually rigid, which can 
restrict the tree's movement in high winds and leave the upper portion of the 
canopy to bear the brunt of the force. 



h 



* 



m 



Soil compaction. This is a slow tree damage process, often with few or no 
other signs of the cause. In compacted soil, pore space has been reduced and roots 
do not get enough" oxygen. Often the tree slowly declines and dies. Soil compaction 
can be avoided by aerating the soil, by mulching and by preventing soil disruption 
around trees on construction sites. 

Bad planting. Planting is one of the most important processes to ensure the 
tree's health and longevity. Make sure the planting hole is two to three times wider 
but no deeper than the tree's root ball. Plant trees promptly and make sure they get 
adequate water so that roots do not dry. 

Watering. Both over- and under-watering can be harmful for trees. Watering is 
critical for all trees in dry spells as well as young or newly transplanted trees. Moni- 
toring the soil moisture is one of (he best ways of making sure that adequate water 
is provided. 



s~ 



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a UniQue Gift 

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* Handpainted Furniture and Decor 

Visit our Theme Rooms: 

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Improper pruning. Pruning should follow standards established in ANSI 
A300, published by the American National Standards Institute. Proper pruning is a 
tree health treatment, but one of the most neglected tree care practices. 

Have a professional arborist evaluate your trees. This will help you determine 
potential weaknesses and dangers. Ask the arborist to look for stress cracks, weak 
branches and other subtle indicators of potential hazards. Check the tree for dead 
or partially attached limbs hung up in higher branches that could fall and cause 
damage or injury during a storm. 

For a list of professional arborists in your area, or to get information on the care 
and maintenance of trees, contact the National Arborists Association, 1-800-733- 
2622 or by a zip code search on the NAA's Web site: www.nadarb.com. The NAA is a 
60-year-old public and professional resource on trees and arboriculture. Its more 
than 2,300 members all recognize stringent safety and performance standards, and 
are required to carry liability insurance. 



%#L 



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Christopher Hoetz, cap 
BroW 



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January 28, 2000 



HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers i E9 



Lake County 
Home & Garden Expo 

Directory 






A Clean Sweep Inc. 

A & H Construction 

AT&T Cable Service 

Accent Land Design 

Accua Pool & Spas 

All American H20 Inc. . 

All American Rpofing 

AH Temp Heating & Cooling Company 

Alpine Industries 

Americlean Inc. 

Ameritech (Employee Opportunities) , 

Anderson Floors & Walls 

Arbor View 

Arlington Heights Kirby 

BackVard Enclosures Inc. 

Beanie Central Chicago 

Breezy Hill Nursery 

Brinks Home Security Inc. 

Budget Landscaping Company 

Business & Home Computing Solutions 

Carpet Castle 

Century Tile & Supply Company" 

Cera Bella 

Chris-Kare Sunrooms 

Clownin Around 

Commonwealth United Mortgage 

Creative Deck Builders 

DK Family Learning 

Daily Herald 

Dawn's Custom Cabinetry Company 

Decade Floor Coverings Inc. 

Dish-Jockeys 

Douglas TV 

Electrolux Corporation 

Fair Field Material & Supply 

Fisher Mortgage Company * 

Tour Seasons Heating & Cooling 

Gazcbocraft Inc. 

Global Waterproofing Company 

H & R Custom Designs 

Hacker Exterior Inc. 

Handyman Online Inc. 

Hinckley Springs 

Home Comfort Heating & Cooling Company 



Home Improvement Network 
Home Interiors & Gifts 

Intemestcom 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Laursen & Blackmail Company 

Leafguard 

Liberty Safes of Chicago 

Lifestyle window & Doors 

Line-X 

Lone Oak Electric 

Market Journal 

Mega Home Improvement Company 

Merry Maids Mundeleln 

Midwest Builders 

Miller Heating & Cooling Company 

Nations Credit 

netDirect 

News Sun 

North Protection Services Inc. 

Orange Brite Inc. 

Pampered Chef 

Patio Enclosures, Inc. 

Paul Swartz Nursery 

Pioneer Press 

RE/MAX Real Estate (Christopher Hoelz) 

Resort Travel Corporation 

Results Lawn Care 

Santi Construction 

Sears Homelife Furniture 

Smithereen Pest Control Company 

Sparkling Spring Water Company 

Strictly Spas Inc. 

Studio Designs 

Suburban Family Magazine 

• Superior Exteriors, Inc. 

2 Men and a Truck 

The Contractor Pages.com 

The South Bend Chocolate Company 

Top Deck Builders 

Top-Tec Heating & Cooling 

Tru-Green Chemlawn 

Uncommon USA Inc. 

Water Tech 

Watertight Plumbing Company 



Trees For Tomorrow offers 
seedlings and courses 

Plan for 2000 tree planting season by calling 
Trees For Tomorrow 

he best time to plant a tree is 50 years ago. The second best time is right 

now, "said forester Sandy Lotto as she announced that for the 56th year 

Trees For America natural resources specialty school in Eagle River 

M would have a variety of tree seedlings available for sale during the 2000 

growing season. 
"We'll be offering six species this year," said Lotto. "Red and white pine, blue 
and white spruce, northern white cedar and a white spruce hybrid. All of the 
seedlings are about 6" to 8" tall and come "containerized" in their own plug of soil, 
ready to plant." 

Lotto said the trees can be shipped anywhere in the country and can be ordered 
anytime at prices ranging from 50<r to $1 per tree depending on the species. Ship- 
ping will begin about the middle of May. Trees will then be available all summer 
long and into early fall. Discounts of 10 percent or 20 percent are available on 
volume orders and a $4.50 per order shipping and handling charge is applied. 
Tree seedlings brochures and order forms can be obtained by calling 800-838- 
9472. 

"Today, Trees For Tomorrow is a natural resources specialty school which pro- 
vides forestry and environmental workshops for over 5,000 students annually from 
all over Wisconsin, upper Michigan and northern Illinois," Lotto explained, "but 
our history is as a tree planting organization and so we continue to sell seedlings 
as a reminder of that history and as a way to raise scholarship funds for our school. 
AH tree seedlings proceeds are used for student scholarships." 



mm\m %im 





CENTURY 

Electric Supply Company 
and Lighting Showroom 

168 Peterson Rd. (Rt. 137) 
Libertyville • (847) 680-0800 

Hours: M-F 7:30-5:00, Sat. 8:00-1:00 
Sun. Closed 



MoilciCoid 



E10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOME & GARDEN GUIDE 2000 



January 28, 2000 




-saving ideas for your home 



■ i 

J sing energy wisely can reduce consumption and save money on utility 
bills, according to the American Gas Association. Here are some tips: 

1. Seal le"aks around doors, windows and other openings, such as 
E I pipes or ducts— with caulking or weather-stripping. 
^^/B 2. Set thermostats between 65 and 70 degrees in the winter, at 

least 5 degrees lower when sleeping and at 58 degrees when away from 
home for more than a few hours. (Warmer temperatures are recommended for 
homes with ill or elderly persons or infants.) 

3. Set water heater temperatures at 140 degrees (at 120 degrees in homes with in- 
fants or elderly persons to guard against accidental scalding) and install water-flow 
restrictors in showerheads and faucets. 

4. Change filters or clean the filters in heating and cooling units twice a year. 
Close vents and doors in unused rooms. If pipes or ducts run through unheated ar- 
eas, insulate them. 

5. Use drapes, shutters, awnings, shade trees, glass with reflective film or solar 
screens to keep sunlight out in the summer and let it in during the winter. 



6. Check to see if attic and basement (or crawl space) have the recommended lev- 
el of insulation. 

7. If you have a woodburning fireplace, consider installing a natural gas fireplace 
insert, which can save on energy cost compared with wood. A gas fireplace also will 
dramatically reduce the air pollution created from burning wood. 

8. Consider storm or thermal windows and doors or double paned glass. A less 
expensive alternative is plastic sheeting, which can be temporarily fastened over 
doors and windows to retain heat or air conditioning. 

9. Be sure that dishwashers, washing machines and clothes dryers are fully 
loaded before running. 

10. When buying new appliances, compare energy efficiency ratings and annual 
operating cost. A slightly higher initial cost for a high-efficiency appliance could pay 
itself back in a very short time through energy savings and lower utility bills. 

Many natural gas utilities offer assistance and special programs designed to help 
consumers reduce their energy bills. Contact your local gas utility for more informa- 
tion. 




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January 28, 2000 .HOME & GARDEN 



Lakeland Newspapers / E 1 1 



Kitchen and bath ventilating 

increase in winter 




It has been estimated that in the average home, 

the kitchen produces more than 

200 pounds of airborne grease annually. 



Add to that smoke, heat, moisture 
and odors and it's easy to see why 
the kitchen poses such a threat to 
the indoor environment. Soiled 
surfaces and a fouled atmosphere are the 
by-products of cooking activities. 

There Is an economical and effective 
way to assure that the kitchen environment 
stays fresh, clean and healthful. Modern 
range hoods expel all the pollutants pro- 
duced by range usage before they can cause 
problems. Your kitchen may already be 
equipped with a range hood, but it may not 
offer, the advantages or capabilities of the 
newer models. Range hood manufacturers 
have kept pace with the changing role of the 
kitchen as it has emerged as a major center 
of activity in the home. 

Situated above the range, the hoods fea- 
ture powerful exhaust ventilators that rapid- 
ly expel pollutants to the outdoors where 
they are harmless. There are also non-duct- 
ed range hoods which feature sophisticated 
filtering systems. These filters remove im- 
purities from the air, returning, fresh, clean 
air to the kitchen. For the range hood to 
reach its maximum potential for cleansing 
the kitchen air, it must be properly selected 
and installed. 

Proper ventilation in the bathroom, is 
also of critical importance, in providing a 
relatively trouble-free winter home envi- 
ronment. That's because of the great 
amounts of airborne moisture which the 



bathroom produces. 

Use of the shower creates a large 
amount of water vapor. In addition, it also 
leads to an increase of water vapor pressure. 
This means that the moisture in the air can 
be forced into the walls, cabinets and other 
areas in the bathroom, causing rotting of 
wallboard or window framing and peeling 
paint. The moisture can also.escape to oth- 
er areas of the house, causing further dam- 
age-Compounding the problem, the bath- 
room generates other pollutants such as 
heat, odors and aerosols. 

The most efficient way to qujckly rid the 
bathroom of these unwanted elements is 
with a bathroom exhaust fan which is duct- 
ed to the outside. Tests have shown ducted 
bathroom fans to be far more effective in 
cleansing the air than those fans which sim- 
ply draw the air through a filter. An exhaust 
fan, mounted on the ceiling or wall and duct- 
ed outside, quietly and efficiently expels 
moisture and other pollutants before they 
can cause problems. In addition the fan gets . 
rid of heat, odors and aerosol pollutants. 

The Home Ventilating Institute publish- 
es a guide which provides information 
about the need for proper ventilation and 
how to achieve it Single copies of the Home 
Ventilating Guide are free and can be ob- 
tained by writing to the Home Ventilating 
Institution Division of the Air Movement 
and Control Association, 30 West Universi- 
ty Drive, Arlington Heights, IL 60004. 



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A new deck complete with a gazebo is a decorative and functional accent to your 
landscaping and a pleasant addition to the value of your home. It offers a wonder- 
ful avenue of entertainment fpr the entire family and a place of tranquility in the 
great outdoors. Gazebocraft, located in Gurnee, specializes in gazebos arid deck 
construction, as well as other landscape accents. 

Our gazebos are prefabricated kits of completely stained and weatherproofed 
western red and inland cedar with hand-split cedar shake roofs. Gazebocraft cur- 
rently carries three designs, including octagon sizes of 12 feet and 15 feet and 
oblong sizes of 12x17 feet and 15x21 feet. Two of these models can be utilized as a 
three-season room and can be shipped anywhere. Complete installation is provid- 
ed by Gazebocraft or, for the do-it-yourselfer, easy-to-follow " instructions are 
included. 

When it comes to decks, regardless of the size, Gazebocraft can do the job from 
start to finish. With many years of experience, we offer many proven designs or can 
construct a design of your choosing. If you're planning new construction, a remod- 
eling project, or have always dreamed of having your own deck or gazebo, contact 
Gazebocraft at 847-548-1717. Our estimating staff will be more than happy to visit 
with you by appointment, survey your building needs, and quote you a fair price 
at no obligation. Enhance your summer lifestyle by contacting the specialists at 
Gazebocraft today. 






E 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



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